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toll) Carolina 



'v. 5"? 




Advocate 



Ofticial Oiaan of He Western Corth &it>n$^erence 
IDfffiocOst episcopal £Dur^°atl) 



Thursday, January 8, 1914 




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A NEW YEAR'S MEDITATION 



BY W. L. HUTCHINS 

A cami ib in ir,;, iMmtiasi as I view the rolling spheres 
With smiling eyes of laughter or starred with crystal tears, 
Whether songs or sighing my heart shall feel no fears 
For God's unceasing goodness makes lovely all the years. 1 

I will not pray for purple nor raiment trimmed with lace, 
For down in dingy hovels the fashions have no place. 
I pray Thee, Lord, to give me a heart and smiling face, 
A willing hand for service and garments of Thy grace. 

I will not roam the mountains when the valleys far below 
Are filled with pallid children driven to and fro 
At the call of Iron Monsters whose souls no mercies know, 
Who rob them of their play-time and kill their youthful glow. 

I will not walk the pavement when there's a darkened trail 
That leads through haunts of evil and hunger's howling wail; 
Where the ravished rose of virtue has changed its red for pale 
And the silent power of goodness in barren lives doth fail. 

I will not pray for hill-tops when the plain is smirched by sin, 
Through all its dark meanders I see where Christ has been 
It's joy for me to follow through the noise and deaf'ning din 
The bruised Man of Sorrows to serve my kith and kin 

When the weary sun is sinking and the mists are falling free, 
When muscles lose their motion and eyes refuse to see, 
And the seamless clouds of evening, God's livery, comes for me, 
O the joy when Christ shall answer, "Ye did it unto Me!" 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 








Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 8, 1914 



»■ ~ + 

Note and Comment 

♦ * 

Wireless on Trains 

The Lackawanna Railroad by a recent test 
has proven that the Marconi system may easily 
be adapted to railway service. Of course the 
ordinary wireless station with its high towers 
cannot be established on a train on account 
of bridges and tunnels, but instead of such a 
station there is set upon the roof of the car 
"a quadrangle of wire supported at a height 
of only eighteen inches above the car," which 
serves the purpose of the usual high tower erect- 
ed above the deck of the ship. 

Not only do recent experiments of wireless 
telegraphy on trains assure its general use at 
an early day by the railroads of the country, 
but its usefulness to both the travelling public 
and for operative purposes on the part of the 
railroads themselves is a certainty ; for wire 
communication is frequently destroyed by 
storm or flood, emergencies arrive between sta- 
tions when instant communication would prove 
of untold value in averting a wreck, preventing 
troublesome delays, or in supplying the unex- 
pected needs of passengers. In such contingen- 
cies wireless will serve on trains, just as it has 
proven of inestimable worth to those on board 
ships. It may, also,; come to be used in the 
transmission of orders and, thereby, become a 
great time-saver, as there would be no stopping 
for orders, these being received while the train 
is running. 

# # # # 

Eighty Persons Killed at a Christmas Tree 

At Calumet, Mich., several hundred copper 
miners with their wives and children were as- 
sembled in a hall on Christmas eve, engaged 
in the festivities of a Christmas tree celebra- 
tion, when some man put his head in at the 
door and shouted ' ' fire ! " It was a false alarm. 
Nevertheless, a panic ensued. Everybody start- 
ed for the door at the same time, uttering vari- 
ous cries of alarm. In the confusion the weak- 
er were thrown to the floor and trampled upon, 
those behind tried to climb over those in front 
and the whole company became like a herd 
of stampeding cattle. The stairways and other 
avenues of escape were so blocked that those 
on the inside could not get out, neither those 
on the outside get in to aid the panic-stricken 
crowd. Finally, when the panic subsided and 
the hall was cleared, eighty, mostly children, 
were found dead. Thousands gathered on Sun- 
day for the funeral, when the bodies of the 
men and women were borne to the cemetery in 
hearses, but the little white caskets of the chil- 
dren were carried on the shoulders of the 
miners — a most impressive procession of the 

unfortunate dead. 

# # # # 

A Year Memorable in the Affairs of Govern- 
ment 

A new tariff law, the most comprehensive 
tariff legislation ever enacted, a currency law 
that is a vast scheme of financial re-organiza- 
tion, the adoption of amendments to the con- 
stitution of the United States that would give 
the country an income tax and the right to 
elect United States Senators by the direct vote 
of the people, are only a part of the changes 
in government wrought out during the past 
year. A parcel post system was put into suc- 
cessful operation. The Interstate Commerce 
Commission began the physical valuation of 
railroads. The Supreme Court sustained the 
validity of the Sherman law as a criminal 
measure, and gave other decisions of far-reach- 
ing effect. The year marks the coming of a 
Democratic president and Congress — the first 
since Grover Cleveland. 

# # # # 

Another Theory as to Cause of Pellagra 

That pellagra infection results from bad - 



sewerage was the theory advanced by the 
Thompson-Macfadden Pellagra Commission in 
its report January 2, before the American As- 
sociation for the Advancement of Science. In 
districts completely equipped with sewerage 
disposals, says the report, few cases of pellagra 
have been found, and these have been of doubt- 
ful origin. The report says, also, that new 
cases of pellagra developed for the most part 
in the vicinity of old ones or after association 
with them. A former theory that the use of 
certain foods, as the eating of corn bread, caus- 
ed pellagra is discarded by the Commission 
as lacking in facts to support it. 

The report, however, declares that the exact 
mode of transmission of pellagra is uncertain, 
and urges the continued study of insects as 
transmitting agents. The commission is hope- 
ful that in a year or two the exact cause of 
pellagra will have been discovered. 

Pellagra is not a Southern disease, essentail- 
ly. It is found in other parts of the country, 
but warm weather aggravates its symptoms. 
The South, as a consequence, is a section more 
favorable to its development and possibly for 
its spread, whetever the agents of transmis- 
sion may be. 

# * # # 

The Methodist Year Book for 1914 

The Year Book of the Methodist Episcopal 
church gives 139,739 as the total net increase 
in church membership for 1913. This is re- 
garded as a very satisfactory showing. The 
total membership of the Methodist Episcopal 
church is 3,757,508. Almost 2,000,000 South- 
ern Methodists, with other Methodist bodies 
in the United States send the grand total in 
the nation well beyond the 6,000,000 mark. 
One hundred years ago there were only 211,- 
129 Methodists in the United - - ■ 

These figures show a remarkable growth of 
Wesleyanism during the last century. 

# # * # 

Ten Years of Aviation 

The Wright brothers ten years ago made 
their first successful flight of 852 feet above 
the sand dunes of Kitty Hawk. It was the 
beginning of flight in heavier-than-air ma- 
chines driven by mechanical means. Now, fly- 
ing machines are accepted by the civilized na- 
tions of the world as useful in war, both on 
land and sea. These machines have attained 
the dizzy height of three and a half miles 
above the earth, covered the distance of four- 
teen hundred miles in a single day, and have 
made successfully the trip across the American 
continent. To the question, "Will we ever 
fly?" most people, a little while ago, answered 
in the negative, but now flying is of such or- 
dinary occurrence that the majority have ac- 
tually forgotten when we began. 

Old Mother Earth 

No scientist who has undertaken to estimate 
the earth 's age has put it less than fifty million 
years. From these figures the different esti- 
mates run all the way to a thousand million and 
beyond. If these learned gentlemen may be 
relied upon, the much used term, ' ' old mother 
earth," need not be looked upon as an oppro- 
brious epithet, but as strictly in keeping with 
the facts. 

The "Win-My-Chum" Campaign 

At the Montana State Epworth League Con- 
vention last June General Secretary Sherman 
launched the " Win-My-Chum " Campaign. 

The Epworth Herald, organ of the Epworth 
Leagues in-, the Methodist Episcopal church, 
has given the new movement its enthusiastic 
support. In November a week was set apart 
for special services in behalf of the young 
people. From reports already sent to the cen- 
tral office it is evident that much good has 
resulted from this special campaign. Two 
thousand conversions and an increased demand 



for Epworth League study books are among the 
good features of the work, as reported. 
* * # * 

The Discussion of Social Questions Invading 
the South 

There is no reference in this connection to 
the advocacy of Socialism, which would over- 
turn the present social order and substitute a 
supposedly better state of society therefor. 
But we refer to the attention being given to 
the existing order of society and to the social 
wrongs that ought to be righted. Volume upon 
volume have been written on these subjects. 
Social problems have engrossed the attention of 
playwrights. In the big universities of the 
North the departments of Sociology have been 
crowded with eager students. These activi- 
ties on the part of the leaders of thought and 
a corresponding interest on the part of the 
people has to the present been confined mainly 
to other sections of the country. But the peo- 
ple of the South are beginning to sit up and 
take notice. 

For example, five articles and several book 
reviews in the January number of the "Meth- 
odist Re-view," deal with different aspects of 
social questions. Which indicates that the Re- 
view is getting in line with other periodicals 
of like grade. 

The Southern people are, also, relishing such 
books as Winston Churchill's "Inside of the 
Cup ' ' — a straw that shows which way the wind 
blows. 

Will all this discussion of social conditions 
that is evidently upon us prove of any prac- 
tical value? Let us hope that we shall reap a 
larger harvest of social betterment than the 
people to the north of us have up to the 
present. 

.« #*##; 

The President's Mexican Policy Unchanged 

After President Wilson's conference last week 
with John Lind, the ambassador to Moxira ,tH<j 
president announced that there would be no 
change in policy toward Mefico. The coming 
of John Lind to meet the president during his 
vacation at Gulf port, Miss., occasioned much 
interest on the part of the newspaper men, and 
some of them expressed the belief that this 
conference would result in an entire change of 
program on the part of the United States. "It 
was only to get together to talk for mutual 
information," said the president, and -that 
there had been no special occasion for Mr. 
Lind's visit. The Huerta government must in- 
evitably fall is the opinion of the president. 
<- i, '* * "* * ' t<>> H l* At mn % i 

Vessels Through the Canal in Seventy Days 

The Panama Canal within seventy days will 
be able to pass ships entirely across the isthmus 
unless some unforeseen hindrance arises. Such 
is the latest report from the authorities who 
have the work in charge. The only hindrance 
at present is a slide in the Culebra cut. Dredges 
are at work to remove this obstacle within the 
time mentioned. But owing to certain con- 
ditions that carry with them an element of 
uncertainty it has been deemed well not to 
appoint a date for the formal opening, even 
after the canal can be passed through, for it 
will take some time to train the operating 
force of the canal. 



—The Southern Real Estate Company, one 
of the oldest and most successful business or- 
ganizations in Greensboro, announces the be- 
ginning of their twenty-fifth year of success- 
ful business. With the new year Mr. David 
White retires as president and Mr. A. W. 
MeAlister, who has been connected with the 
company from the time it was first organized, 
takes his place at the head of the company. 
This company does a large real estate and 
loan business and has the remarkable record of 
never having lost a penny for a customer jn 
all its history. 



HortD Carolina CDrlstlan Advocate 



ESTABLISHED 185S 


H. M. BLAIR. Editor 


Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church, South 


$ 1 .50 Per Annum in Ad vane f 


Volumn LIX 


GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 8, 1914 


Number 1 




THE PROPOSED INSURANCE ASSO- 
CIATION 

The manner in which the press has referred 
to this subject during the past week will justify, 
if it does not require, some explanation. The 
whole matter originated with some of our peo- 
ple who have seen for years that the church is 
paying a high price for what insurance it car- 
ries, and that, after all, the great bulk of church 
property, especially in the country, is without 
protection. The present movement took form 
from observation of the very satisfactory work- 
ing in most cases of the Farmers Mutual Insur- 
ance Association. The idea was to organize 
somewhat on the same plan for the church so 
as to secure insurance for as near the cost of 
administration as possible. 

The report goes out through the papers that 
a new insurance company is to be organized and 
that Rev. Dr. C. W. Byrd will likely be the 
president. Dr. Byrd wishes it distinctly under- 
stood that he will not be president in case the 
company is organized. He is merely acting as 
chairman of the committee appointed by the 
Conierenee. It is not known just yet what the 
form of organization will be, but the plan is to 
let the offices be filled so as to interfere as little 
as possible with any minister's work and make 
as little draft as possible upon the funds for 
expense of administration. 



THE OUTLOOK FOR THE NEW YEAR 

This new year gleams forth with the light 
of hope. No year ever dawned upon the world 
with quite so much of promise. If we do not 
enter in and possess the great things which a 
kind providence has set before us the fault 
will be ours. 

There is no excuse for the cry of the pes- 
simist. In every department of human en- 
deavor, whether it be in trade, traffic, scientific 
research, efforts for political, social and re- 
ligious uplift, there is every reason why the 
faithful worker should take courage. 

As we endeavor to go forward with the du- 
ties of the new year, let us not forget that its 
contribution will depend upon what of sac- 
rifice and earnest toil we are willing to put in 
as an investment. The promise of reward is 
open to him alone who is willing to stand in 
the place of opportunity and make labor a 
luxury rather than a drudgery to be dreaded. 
Plenty to do and a willingness to do it with 
a zest will not only lighten the burden of life, 
but will bring to life a charm that nothing else 
can give. The people who become tired and 
dissatisfied with life are those who have little 
to do. To such, life becomes only a sort of 
imprisonment and to live is scarcely worth 
while. Therefore we will not complain if the 
new year greets us with many tasks yet to be 
completed. 

The year 1914 gives promise of greater op- 
portunities for the reward of honest toil. At 
the same time it promises less to the man who 
would enrich himself by preying upon his fel- 
lows. There is great hope for the coming of 
that golden day when a man shall have the 
due reward of honest toil, and this year we 



believe will witness at least the beginning of 
an era of economic adjustment wlricS must 
finally lead to this happy result. 

The year 1914 promises better things for 
the social order. Life is to be made happier 
for the masses. There will be more in city and 
in country to enjoy and less to mar the pleas- 
ures and blessings of living. By the steady 
progress of medical science and of sanitary 
precaution there will be less of pain and suf- 
fering, and the average of human life will be 
lengthened. 

In the radiant glow of that hope which 
spans the horizon of this new year there is 
nothing that shines out with quite so much of 
glory and inspiration as the gospel of the Son 
of God. No man should turn toward the task 
of the new year with a more buoyant spirit 
than the one who feels assured that to him 
has been committed the joyous task of pub- 
lishing peace to the world. The attitude of 
the nations as well as all conditions of society 
proclaim the fact that there is to be the open 
way and the welcome for the man who comes 
to proclaim glad tidings — to publish peace to 
a world that has been torn and distressed by 
sin and social disorder. This year, 1914, is 
to witness the world's greatest opportunity 
to bring all nations under the influence of that 
gospel which alone can finally make it possible 
for the nations to disarm and dwell together 
in peace. The age of the prophet's vision is 
still in the future, but we are approaching 
the happy day when "men shall learn war no 
more." What, with the progress of science, 
life is prolonged and made easier, how much 
more glorious that death itself is robbed of its 
sting by this gospel, and eternity swings wide 
its gates to an immortal spirit that shall never 
die. 

Behold, the morning of a new year cometh ! 
Let it summon us to joyous tasks. 

"Hark, 'tis the watchman's cry, 

Wake, brethren, wake ! 
Jesus Himself is nigh; , 

Wake, brethren, wake! „ 
Sleep is for the sons of night; 
Ye are children of the light; 
Yours is the glory bright; 

Wake, brethren, wake! 



THE REVERENT ATTITUDE 

In our study of God's word it is necessary 
that we maintain the reverent attitude. The 
Psalmist gave expression to an essential truth 
when he said, "The meek will he guide in judg- 
ment, the meek will he teach his way." Again, 
' ' The secret of the Lord is with them that fear 
him; and he shall show them his covenant." 
There is not much hope for those who trust 
in mere scholarship. St. Paul, with all the 
scholarship of the age in which he lived, did 
not trust in this to give power and effect to 
his ministry. To the church at Corinth he 
said, "My speech and my preaching was not 
with enticing words of man's wisdom, but in 
demonstration of the spirit and of power ; that 
your faith should not stand in the wisdom of 
men, but in the power of God. ' ' 

The final appeal of our faith is not to an 
intellectual tribunal, but rather to that of an 
inner consciousness which responds to the direct 
ministry of the Holy Spirit. The ministry of 



our Lord climaxed in this, that the Comforter 
should come into the world. When He, the 
Comforter, should come, He was to teach the 
disciple all things — the disciple of today as 
well as the disciple at Pentecost. 

One of the perils of our time is an intellec- 
tual vanity which vaunts itself both in the 
pulpit and in the chair of the theological pro- 
fessor. We sometimes fear also that the same 
spirit is permeating the teaching of the Sab- 
bath school. This intellectual vanity disports 
itself in efforts to discredit traditional beliefs 
and to shatter the accredited tenets of orthodox 
teaching. It does not approach the study of the 
scriptures with that reverent spirit which would 
enthrone God, the Holy Ghost, as the inner 
light ; but, with a cynical sneer at all the claims 
of formulated belief, it would burn incense 
to anything which it is able to parade as new 
thought. Thus, instead of making stronger the 
foundations of the Christian faith, it would 
open the way by insidious forms of suggestion 
for the rooting of a blighting skepticism. 

Calling attention to the fact that unbelievers 
are not necessarily scholars, the Herald and 
Presbyter very aptly says : 

The truth of God can be learned only by the 
guidance of God. It is still true that ' ' the fear 
of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom. ' ' He 
who is not reverent and believing has not begun 
to learn even the alphabet of divine truth. The 
scholarship that exalts itself against God's 
Word is the merest foolishness with God. 

Some men seem to think that they display 
great modern scholarship by objecting to the 
accepted doctrines of the Bible, belittling the 
men with whom God made His covenants, call- 
ing in question the miracles, sneering at pre- 
dictive prophecy, arguing against the necessity 
for the experience of divine grace in the soul, 
undermining reverence for sacred things, and 
destroying faith in the supernatural. 

Some men are doing these very things today 
who are posing as scholars in theological sem- 
inaries and as pedagogical experts in Sabbath 
school periodicals. We are having a worse 
plague in some of the departments of our Sab- 
bath school work than Egypt had when it was 
invaded by the pests of the ten plagues. This 
thing must stop or our Sabbath schools will 
breed rationalism instead of faith. 

The church of Jesus Christ has ever had to 
contend for the faith that was once delivered 
to the saints, but today it must contend with 
those within its own lines who have been ap- 
pointed to man its own guns for its own de- 
fense, and who have turned those guns in the 
wrong direction, so as to attack instead of 
defend. What we need today, all through 
the church, is a scholarship that will not emu- 
late the spirit and style of Paine and Voltaire, 
but that will seek the guidance of the Holy 
Spirit in walking humbly before God. 



— The Greensboro Patriot is doubtless tha 
oldest weekly publication in the State Mon- 
day, December 29, was its ninety-third birth- 
day. On that day it greeted its readers as a 
semi-weekly. Hereafter it is to be published 
on Mondays and Thursdays. Editor Under- 
wood is a good newspaper man and we con- 
gratulate him as well as his many subscribers 
on this evidence of progress. The price of the 
semi-weekly paper will be $2.00 per year. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 8, 1914 



».....«»«..».». «»»«««»«««»«»»»»««•}• 

Contributions 

» » 

NEW YEAR— 1914 

To be sung to tune, "Bread of Life" 
See it! Yea, sing it out! 

Hark to the sound! 
How quickly thus the years 

Come rolling round, 
A-leaving furrowed age 

Upon our brow! 
And we seem not to know 

Just when or how. 

Worry and flurry as 

The moments fly! 
Burdening our souls 

With care-worn sighs ; 
Troubing of many things 

That ne'er come nigh, 
When we should happy be 

'Neath heaven's blue sky- 

Oh, may we thus resolve 

This New Year Day— 
'Look only for sunshine" 

Upon life 's way. 
Then will our souls drink deep 

Of fountains bright, 
Soon leaving on our brow 

Eternal light! 
Concord, N. C. E. A. P. 



FINE PLANS FOR JUNALUSKA 

John M. Moore 

Five splendid conferences have been planned 
for Lake Junaluska, North Carolina, next sum- 
mer. According to the provisional program, 
which in all probability will be carried out, 
the Epworth League will open the series on 
July 15 and continue to July 23. Dr. F. S- 
Parker and Rev. J. M. Culbreth will be in 
charge. The Sunday School Conference, conduct- 
ed by Drs. E. B. Chappell, H. M. Hamill, C. D. 
Bulla and L. F. Beatty will begin July 24 
and close August 2. The Conference of Ed- 
ucators, with Dr. Stonewall Anderson in 
charge, will be held August 4-6. The Mis- 
sionary Conference, directed by Dr. W- W. 
Pinson and other Missionary Secretaries, will 
be held August 7-16. The Bible Conference, 
with Dr. W. F. Tillett as Dean, will be con- 
ducted August 16-23. Mrs. R. W. MacDonell 
and her associates will hold a Conference of 
Deaconesses August 24-26. 

Such is the plan that was agreed upon by 
representatives of the Southern Assembly and 
the various connectional boards at a meeting 
held in Nashville, December 30, of which Bish- 
op James Atkins was Chairman and John M- 
Moore, Secretary. Others present were George 
R. Stuart, James Cannon, John R. Pepper, 
E. B. Chappell, W. W. Pinson, Stonewall 
Anderson, F. S. Parker, Ed F. Cook, G- B. 
Winton, L. F. Beatty, C. D. Bulla, E. H. 
Rawlings and " J. M- Culbreth. During part 
of the session Mrs. R. W. Mac Donell, Mrs. 
J. B. Cobb and Dr. T. N. Ivey were present- 

The Southern Assembly, of which Bishop 
Atkins is the president, and Dr. James Can- 
non the General Superintendent, is an insti- 
tution of Southern Methodism, having the en- 
dorsement of the representative bodies of the 
Church. The purpose of its existence is to 
promote the work of Methodism and the cause 
of Christianity, by providing a place for great 
mid-summer church conferences, at which the 
various phases of church activities may be 
discussed and plans for larger service in these 
various departments may be formulated. It 
combines recreation with instruction where 
both may be sanctified and beautified by a 
prevailing Christian spirit and an intelligent 
devotion to Jesus Christ and the study of his 
word. The Boards of the church should, and 



do, recognize in the Southern Assembly, not 
only a co-worker, but a vital part of their 
respective departments of labor. Bishop At- 
kins, Dr. Cannon, Dr. Stuart, Mr. Pepper, and 
their associates should have the hearty thanks 
of the church for what they have accomplished 
and the sympathetic co-operation of all South- 
ern Methodism in carrying to completion the 
magnificent plans which have been adopted for 
a great Southern Assembly. 



ON BOARD THE STEAMER "AN- 
VERSVILLE" 

Inasmuch as the Methodists of North Caro- 
lina are interested in the opening of the new 
mission in Central Africa, we are printing 
below a letter from Rev. C. C. Bush, one of 
the three missionaries who has dedicated his 
life to the service of this field. — Editor. 

The party of missionaries to the new South- 
ern Methodist Mission at the village Wembo- 
Niama, Congo Beige, Dankuru District, Af- 
rica, spent three weeks in London procuring 
supplies such as groceries to last one yare, 
stoves, cooking utensils, dishes, chairs, beds, 
lamps, mosquito netting and long-topped boots, 
white duck and kaki clothes, white wide-brim- 
med pith helmets, rain coats, umbrellas and 
various household articles. Mr. Stockwell, our 
architect, had charge of selecting such tools 
as will be needed for sawing down trees, mak- 
ing boards, building houses, cultivating gar- 
dens and doing other industrial work. Dr. 
Mumpower, our physician, has several boxes 
of apparatus for hospital work. The pocket- 
book for the mission consists in part of 200 
sacks amounting to five tons; 100 suits of 
clothes, 1736 yards of cloth, 288 belts, 432 
shirts, 108 red handerchiefs, 360 slates, some 
pencils, paper, Bible pictures, and various 
other articles. 

We have spent two months and one week 
in Belgium studying the French language, 
because experienced missionaries in the Congo 
Beige put great emphasis upon being able to 
converse in French which is spoken by the 
officials- After many mistakes, such as asking 
for bread when we thought we were asking for 
butter ; using the word for sheep instead of the 
word for the chin; speaking of the horses on 
our heads instead of the hair; and remarking 
that the shoes were behind the clouds when 
we meant that the sun was behind the clouds, 
we finally succeeded in being able to make our- 
selves understood. All of us have received 
exceedingly kind treatment at the hands of 
the Belgian Protestants and feel that we have 
left many friends among them. 

Bishop W. R. Lambuth and Dr. Ed F. Cook 
of our church, with Dr. W. M. Morrison, a 
Presbyterian missionary at Luebo, came over 
to Belgium and spoke to large audiences in 
several missionary services. Dr. Cook has re- 
turned to America, but the other two persons 
are with us in the " Anversville- " They give 
us the benefit of their experiences in the mis- 
sion fields. We meet daily for devotion and 
instruction in the Baluba-Balua language and 
in missionary policies. 

We sailed from Antwerp, Belgium, at 8 
o'clock Saturday morning, November 8th. The 
sea was so rough for the first few days that 
meals were brought to the ladies in their cab- 
ins. At that time two ladies expressed it as 
their purpose to become permanent residents 
of Africa rather than subject themselves to 
another attack of "mal de mer". However, 
the sea has become so calm that they are about 
ready to take back their statements. Some 
of us men did not escape without some un- 
pleasant experiences in the dining room. 

Our first stop was at La Paline, in the Bay 
of Biscay, on the coast of France. Our boat 
cast anchor and a barge came out of the har- 
bor and brought some passengers and cargo. 
Last night we passed the Canary Islands and 



the weather calls for summer clothes. Our 
next stop is to be at Daker, on the west coast 
of Africa, which we expect to reach on Monday 
and mail this letter. Within three weeks from 
the 8th of November we are due at Matadi. 

Our food is splendid, with some extra del- 
icacies of shrimp, mussels, snails and unmen- 
tionable cheese. Three big fat snails have re- 
ceived due consideration, but when that cheese 
appeared I soon disappeared from the salle a 
•manger. 

Today the chief engineer took us to the en- 
gine room some eighteen feet under water and 
showed us the 6000 horse-power engine which 
can turn two large propellers eighty revolu- 
tions per minute. In the bottom of the ship 
we saw an apparatus for making fresh water, 
one for manufacturing ice, and one for gener- 
ating electricity. The engine room is very 
warm, but large pipes, extending above deck, 
with a curved hood sent down to the stokers 
a cooling draught of air. 

Our cabin is supplied with an electric fan, 
and we are located in a comfortabe section 
near the middle of the boat. The trip has 
been very pleasant thus far. Rev. Tom Mangum 
is making the journey to Africa and keeps us 
all in a happy mood by relating Alabama 
negro stories. Miss J. E. Aglionby, of Lon- 
don, sent seven books to our boat at Antwerp 
for reading matter on the long voyage. We 
regret that it was necessary for Mr. and Mrs. 
Setzer and Mrs. Cleveland to wait for the 
next boat going to the Congo because the Laps- 
ley boat on the upper Congo River is not large 
enough to carry them with us to Luebo at one 
time. 

At the evening meal we receive free the 
"Atlantic Journal," giving news of the world, 
secured by wireless telegraphy. On Novem- 
ber 14th we read of the terrible storm in 
the United States. 

All of us rejoice in the goodness of God in 
leading us to this needy mission land. and. 
we thank Him for the liberality of the Chris- 
tians at home who make the establishment of 
this new mission a reality. 

Sincere salutations, 

Nov. 15, 1913. C. C. Bush. 



THE RADICALISM OF THE WEST 

By Rev. W. P. Andrews 
Strictures on "the radicalism of the West" 
by one of our Conference organs was prompt- 
ed by the vote of the Pacific and other West- 
ern Conferences on the change of name and 
the adoption by them of certain memorials 
to the General Conference, asking for advanc- 
ed legislation. Really, in relation to our breth- 
ren in the Conferences of the South, we are 
bone of their bone and flesh of their flesh. We 
are of them, and are descendants and heirs 
with them of their members (and those they 
represented) of the most radical General Con- 
ference ever held — that held at New Orleans 
in 1866. We have advanced some on the leg- 
islation of that Conference, but not one for- 
ward step by them has been repudiated. The 
atmosphere breathed by these forbears of ours 
was different from that they had inhaled be- 
fore the war, and this accounted for their ad- 
vanced position. The fact that our brethren 
(most of whom went from them) in the bor- 
der, Western and Mission Conferences go to 
record as favoring such propositions as a 
change of name, it seems to me should con- 
vince their critics in the South of the desira- 
bility of such action, if ours is to be a church 
with a world-wide mission. Of course the suf- 
fix "South" is not a handicap in the South, 
and if our mission is only to that field, a change 
of name is not needed. On some others of our 
"radical" propositions, as full laity rights for 
women, I note that some of the Conferences 
in the heart of the South are with us. The 
loyalty of the Western Conferences is proven 
by their vote on the Vanderbilt question. 



January 8, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



I will give an instance illustrating the rad- 
icalism of the West. The first week in Decem- 
ber was designated "Ministers' Week" at the 
University Farm, at Davis. This farm is in 
charge of the Agricultural Department of the 
University of California- Here the students 
in that department receive the practical part 
of their instructions. "Ministers' Week" was 
for the benefit of the rural clergy of the State, 
to bring them into closer sympathy with those 
among whom they labor, and to secure their 
influence in the University's efforts to better 
the condition of the farming community. Five 
hundred clergymen of the various denomina- 
tions availed themselves of the privileges offer- 
ed. They were provided with free lodgings, 
the regular students moving from the dormi- 
tories into tents, and the overflow from the 
dormitories was provided for by the Southern 
Pacific Company in sleeping cars. They were 
fed at the farm tables, and the railroad com- 
panies furnished free transportation. Fully 
a month's instruction was crowded into this 
one week, and the ministers went away full 
of enthusiasm. I prophesy that as a result 
the Agricultural Trains that are sent out an- 
nually through the country, accompanied by 
lecturers from the University, will be better 
patronized, and there will be a large increase 
in the attendance in the Agricultural Depart- 
ment by farmers' sons. The University author- 
ities inaugurated this innovation with some 
misgivings, but these were fully dissipated, 
and "Ministers' Week" will no doubt be re- 
peated annually. 

Another innovation was introduced by this 
same great University at the opening of the 
fall semester at Berkeley. A course of lectures 
on the temperance question was made a part 
of the curriculum. I assure you that these 
lectures would satisfy the most enthusiastic 
total abstinence and prohibition advocate. And 
(you will hardly believe it) some time since a 
young divinity student registered in this school 
after having left a large church school in the 
South because of the higher criticism taught 
there! Yes the West is radical, but — ■ — -. 
San Francisco. 



RURAL LIFE TEACHINGS OF THE 
BIBLE 

By Prof. W. A. Lippincott, Manhattan, 
Kansas 

The Bible is a rural book- It grew out of 
the life of a rural people. Its idelas are bound 
up with the sturdy simplicity of country com- 
munities. Its prominent characters were, with 
few exceptions, country bred. The problems 
of the Old Testament and the parables of the 
New found their origin and inspiration very 
largely in rural life, or in the conflict that 
waged between the city and the country. It 
is not until we come to the next to the last 
chapter of the last book of the New Tesament 
that we find city life in any way idealized and 
held up to beckon men into better living. 

* ft t ^ 

As one looks over the long list of Bible men 
who stood out from among their fellows as 
pioneers and leaders in thought and action 
and find how many of them were born and 
brought up on the country side, one is very 
strongly reminded of the rather startling mod- 
ern fact that 65 per cent, of the men who are 
today considered as of enough importance to 
have their names listed in "Who's Who in 
America" were raised on the farm or in the 
rural village. Cain and Abel (Gen- 4:2-4) are 
described as country boys as is likely to be the 
case with pioneers. It makes little difference 
whether we consider them as historical char- 
acters or as representative types, as some would 
have us believe, the significant fact is that 
they are not only described as farmers, but 
as specialists. Abel was a live stock farmer, 
while Cain was a grain farmer and in the ac- 
count of their doings is recorded the beginnings 



of the age long conflict between the stockmen 
of the range and the more settled tiller of the 
soil. 

* # * * 

Abraham, Isaac and Jacob were stockmen 
of the wandering type, such as have only rath- 
er recently disappeared from our own western 
plains. They depended upon good range for 
the sustenance of their flocks and herds. You 
will remember that (Gen. 13:1-18) it was when 
the range became short that the herdsmen of 
Abraham and Lot quarreled and bid fair to 
make troube between these kin folks- It was 
necessary for them to separate in order that 
they might find feed for their cattle. In this 
connection, it might be noted that Lot made 
the fatal mistake of choosing some good land 
without reference to the fact that it was in 
s bad neighborhood, and a further mistake in 
moving to the city to become to all intents and 
purposes a retired farmer with the altogether 
loo common modern result of dissatisfaction 
and trouble. 

• • » * 

Isaac was a farmer who married into a 
tricky family and had a tricky son as a reward. 
Jacob was shrewd enough with the help of his 
scheming mother to cheat his brother out of 
his rightful inheritance, and had to leave home 
in order to escape his brother's anger. Because 
he was a skilled stockman, he was able to get 
a job with his uncle, Laban, who tricked him 
. c working for him over fourteen years and 
changed his wages ten times, and we should 
judge from Jacob's complaint that the revision 
was downward. Jacob retaliated by selecting 
the strong lambs for breeding purposes in his 
own flock and allowing the weak ones to breed 
in Laban 's flock. He also seemed to have be- 
lieved in parental influence and tried hard to 
induce spotted and striped sheep, which by 
agreement belonged to him by placing reeds 
in the drinking troughs at the time of breed- 
ing. While the possibility of accomplishing 
this is not admitted by modern science, an 
astonishingly large number of farmers still 
have implicit faith in its possibilities. 

It was to Esau, another livestock man, that 
Jacob could make as an excuse for traveling 
leisurely that ' ' the flocks and herds with young 
are with me and if men should over-drive 
them one day, all the flock will die. Jacob 
married two of his tricky mother's nieces and 
it is no wonder as uncle Henry Wallace points 
out that all of Isaac's grandsons but one turn- 
ed out bad because they were practically in- 
bred with reference to sharp practice. 

In the character of Joseph, the one boy who 
turned out well, he finds a fine illustration of 
the law of heredity which is called "atavism," 
or the creeping out of characteristics from re- 
mote ancestry. In Joseph is found the character 
of Abraham, but developed and broadened. It 
was Joseph, the son of a farmer, who was able 
to lay out a program for cornering the grain 
market of Egypt and present the program to 
the king in such a convincing way that he was 
given the job of carrying it out. 

The king of Egypt at that time was one of 
a foreign dynasty known as the "Shepherd 
Kings" because of their fondness for livestock. 
The Egyptians had religious scruples against 
the use of meat as food and had no skill in 
animal husbandry. It was because of their 
skill as stockmen, that Pharaoh welcomed the 
fathers and brothers of Joseph and gave them 
land in Egypt. Among the Egyptians he was 
not able to find herdsmen who could look after 
his flocks nor people who could make use of 
the abundant pasture that was watered by the 
Nile. 

When a new dynasty came upon the throne 
of Egypt, that was not favorable to stock cul- 
ture, the children of Israel came into disfavor. 
They had farmed to such good advantage that 
their wealth and number had increased until 
they attracted the jealous notice of the new 



monarch. He put them to work in the brick 
yard. 

Moses, the greatest lawyer of all times and the 
man who later led them out of their difficulty, 
was educated in the University of Egypt, but 
was a failure until he had had several years 
practical experience as herdsman for his fath- 
er-in-law. Jethro, to sober his judgment and 
develop him physically and mentally. 

In common with many of the prophets of 
Bible times, Ahijah, the man who placed Jere- 
boam over the ten tribes of Israel, was a rural 
man. Elijah, who outwitted the brilliant and 
scheming Queen Jezebel, went about preach- 
ing in his shepherd's mantle and carrying the 
shepherd's staff as though proud of his country 
origin- 

# # * * 

Of Elisha, his successor, we are told that 
at the time when Elijah offered him a job as 
his helper, that he was plowing with twelve 
yoke of oxen. The fact that it is recorded we 
would interpret to mean that he was consider- 
ed a skillful teamster. Amos, the first man 
who wrote "God" with a capital "G," who 
first preached that Jehovah was not simply a 
local or tribal god, as was Marduk of Babylon, 
Chemosh of Moab and Ashur of Assyria, one 
god among many, but was the God of all peo- 
ples, who judged them not according to their 
acts, was a shepherd and a dresser of syca- 
more trees. We might perhans class him as 
a general farmer because the fruit of the syc- 
amore tree was ground into flour out of which 
a coarse bread was made, which was consumed 
by the poorer classes. 

# # # * 

Micah, the man who gave the best brief defi- 
nition of religion that had been offered in his 
dav and which has not been surpassed since — ■ 
"What does the Lord require of thee but to 
do justly and to love mercy and walk humbly 
with thy God?" — was the son of parents who 
hotnesteaded on the borders of the Philistine 
plain when it was thrown open for settlement 
by King Uzziah. 

Jeremiah, the stalwart progressive in relig- 
ion, who was tried for heresy because he was 
far seeing enough to predict that if the people 
did not change their ways, their enemies would 
overrun the country and destroy the temple 
along with the rest of the town, was from the 
little country village of Anathoth. which lay 
a few miles north of Jerusalem. The regulars 
in religion thought the temple could not be 
destroyed and considered him unorthodox when 
he said it could. 

The birthplaces of Isaiah and Hosea are un- 
known, but surely the burden of their messages 
marks them as at least having had a country 
experience. It was Isaiah, you remember, who 
said (40:11) "He shall lead gently those with 
young," something that in its various applica- 
tions is being taught at the agricultural col- 
leges today. 

# * # * 

When Saul first comes to our attention in 
the Old Testament, he was out on the range 
looking for his father's asses that had broken 
away from the picket or escaped the wrang- 
ler. Later we find him coming after the herd 
out of the field. David was a red-headed farm 
boy, called from keeping the sheep to have 
Judge Samuel pass compliments upon him to 
his father and point out the great possibili- 

The problems which confronted the people 
of the Old Testament, and the questions in- 
volved in current legislation have just as mod- 
ern a ring as has the tremendous preponder- 
ance of country bred folks who were listed 
among the eminent and great. One of the 
problems which they had solved and which 
we have not, was that of co-operation among 
farmers. Another was the question of con- 
centration in the ownership of land with its 
attendant evil, the absentee landlord. — Central 
Christian Advocate, 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATEJanuary 8, 1914 



» » 

From the Field 



AN EARLY ADVOCATE CAMPAIGN 

The Advocate campaign should he inaugu- 
rated at once, so that the paper may make its 
weekly visits throughout the year. The lists 
mil go out now just as rapidly as they can be 
made ready, and we trust that each pastor will 
be kind enough to make the canvass for renew- 
als and new subscribers immediately, or see 
that it is made. Please examine our list of 
premiums and prizes printed on the 16th page. 
It will be seen that there is a nice reward offer- 
ed for all who secure as many as ten or more 
new subscribers. Those who secure the number 
of new subscribers allotted and the renewal of 
the old list will be entitled to a place on the 
roll of honor. The wife of the pastor, or any 
one in the congregation can do the work if the 
pastor does not prefer to do it himself. All 
the premiums and prizes offered are genuine, 
first class goods. Nothing cheap or shoddy 
in the lot. We want to begin our report 
next week. Who will be first to place his 
name and charge on the roll of honor? 



NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— "We are requested to announce that the post 
office address of Rev. J. C. Postell is Monroe, 
N. C„ Rte. No. 4. 

— Rev. L. P. Bogle and his people at Ruffin 
braved the weather on Christmas day and gave 
the prisoners in the convict camp a good dinner. 

— Rev. W. F. Womble has been well received 
by the congregation at Hendersonville and is 
making a fine start. He is preacing to large 
congregations. 

— Mr. W. M. Jordan, who has for some years 
been the proprietor of the Shipp Hotel in New- 
ton, took charge of the Blue Ridge Inn at Mt. 
Airy, January 1st. 

— Mr. John M. Pettit, a faithful and devoted 
member of the Methodist church, died at his 
home at Candler on Monday, December 29th. 
He was 82 years old. 

— The Leaksville Courier says that Uncle 
Dan Field was absent from the Christmas ex- 
ercises at the Methodist church for the first 
time in fifty two years. This is a record 
equalled by few, if any, in the State. 

— The Roaring Gap Hotel was burned during 
the holidays, also a cottage near by, belonging 
to Mr. A. Chatham, of Elkin. The hotel was 
the property of a stock company. The fire is 
thought to have been of incendiary origin. 

— Dr. J. W. Long, of this city, one of the 
most eminent surgeons in North Carolina, was 
elected president of the Southern Surgical 
and Gynecological Association at the annual 
meeting of that organization in Atlanta re- 
cently. 

— -Rev. A. L. Stanford is making a fine be- 
ginning with his new charge at Hickory. He 
thinks he has about the best appointment in 
the Conference. If he keeps up the record 
he is likely to have the congregation thinking 
they have the best preacher before long. 

— Rev. L. T. Cordell, presiding elder of the 
Waynesville District, requests us to announce 
the following supplies appointed for charges 
in the Waynesville district: Judson circuit, 
R. L. Andrews; Robbinsville circuit, W. C. 
Bowden ; Franklin circuit, W. G. Warren. 

—Rev. E. B. Chappell, Sunday School Editor, 
requests us to announce that the annual meet- 
ing of the Chairmen of Sunday School Boards 
and Conference Sunday School Field Secre- 
taries will be held at Hot Springs, Arkansas, 
February 18-20. The meeting will convene 
at 10 A. M., February 18th. 



— Miss Matilda Scroggs, the oldest daughter 
of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. Hyal Scroggs, 
died Wednesday morning, December 31st, 
at the old Scroggs home in Concord township, 
Iredell county, aged about sixty-four years. 
The deceased was a sister of Rev. J. R. 
Scroggs, presiding elder of the Shelby district. 

— The Marshville Home says: — Rev. J. W. 
Williams preached his first sermon since com- 
ing to Marshivlle at the Methodist church 
here Sunday, and it was a good one. His ap- 
pointments will remain as heretofore on this 
charge, with the exception of a service at Marsh- 
ville the second Sunday night in each month. 

— Rev. W. 0. Goode, the new pastor of 
Spring Garden Street church, this city, is mak- 
ing a fine impression and the outlook for a 
successful year is very hopeful. Brother Goode 
and his little family are occupying the parson- 
age on Tate Street and are entering very cheer- 
fully and with helpful interest into the social 
life of the community. 

— Rev. Perley E. Parker, pastor of the Thom- 
asville circuit, was married on December 31 
to Mrs. Lulu Jordan, of Thomasville. The 
marriage took place in West Market Street 
church, Greensboro, and the Rev. Chas. W. 
Byrd, assisted by Rev. Eli Reese, performed 
the marriage service. We extend our hearty 
congratulations, and wish for them God's best 
blessings. 

— Announcement was made at Spartanburg, 
December 24th, that Mrs. Eliza A. Judd, widow 
of a Spartanburg banker, had given gilt-edged 
securities worth $30,000 to Converse College, 
the Young Men 's Christian Association and the 
Textile Industrial Institute as Christmas gifts. 
Each of the institutions receives $10,000. The 
Textile Industrial Institute is under the direc- 
tion of the South Carolina Conference. 

— Rev. James Willson, who was placed on the 
superannuate list at the recent session of the 
Methodist Conference in Charlotte, was in town 
last week. Mr. Willson will continue to live 
for the present at Woodleaf, Rowan County, 
which was his last charge, but may later locate 
in Statesville. Mr. Willson has been in the 
Methodist ministry forty-two years. He joined 
the Conference in Charlotte in 1871 and retired 
from active work there in 1913. — Statesville 
Landmark. 

— Rev. J. H. Ball, of the East Oklahoma 
Conference, was appointed presiding elder of 
the Tulsa district at the recent session of that 
Conference. Brother Ball is a North Carolinian 
who went out west to ' ' grow up with the coun 
try" some years ago. His mother and sisters 
live in Greensboro. We have watched his career 
with no little interest and rejoice at the record 
he has made and at this merited promotion. 
His address is 424 South Park Street, Sapulpa, 
Oklahoma. 

— President Few, of Trinity College, was 
a welcome visitor at the Advocate office on 
Tuesday afternoon of last week. Dr Few was 
returning from a holiday visit to his father 
and mother in South Carolina. We are glad 
to note that Dr. Few seems to be in fine trim 
physically and is looking forward with great 
hope to the work of the new year. On Tues- 
day night he attended a meeting of the local 
alumni of Gaston county at Gastonia and de- 
livered an address. 

— The Rutherford College Boarding Club is 
a great help to the young men of limited 
means. The club was managed last term by 
Mr. W. A. Rollins and the matron, Mrs. Cot- 
ten. More than forty boys secured their board 
for an everage of $5.70 per member. This 
allows a young man to attend school for less 
than $50 per term, or less than $100.00 for 
the entire year- We have these facts from 
President Hinshaw. Why may not any young 
man secure an education? 

— A correspondent of the daily press, writing 
from Mount Airy last week, said: — There is a 
movement on foot that will give this city anoth- 



er Methodist church, for it has been decided 
to sell the circuit parsonage in the southern 
part of the city and use the proceeds of the 
sale to purchase a lot large enough for a 
church and parsonage in the northern part of 
the city. The rapidly increasing population de- 
mands another Methodist church, and those be- 
hind the enterprise say that the improvement 
is practically assured. 

— We note with sincere regret the death of 
Rev. John E. Thompson, a superannuate of the 
North Carolina Conference, which occurred at 
the home of his son in Fayetteville on Saturday, 
December 27th. Brother Thompson joined the 
North Carolina Conference in 1865 and served 
faithfully until age and impairment of health 
necessitated his retirement some years ago. He 
was a pure, sweet-spirited man and much es- 
teemed by all who knew him. Many members 
of the Western North Carolina Conference, who 
joined before the division in 1890 will remem- 
ber Brother Thompson. 

— Bishop Denny had a narrow escape from 
death by poison during the holidays. He was 
taking medicine for some slight ailment and, 
by mistake, swallowed bichloride of mercury. 
Fortunately he discovered his mistake at once 
and by the vigorous use of a stomach pump he 
had emptied the stomach of the poison before 
the physician arrived. He went to Balti- 
more immediately for expert medical advice 
and treatment, and we are glad to say has 
suffered no serious effects. The Bishop 's many 
friends throughout our Conference will re 
joice to learn that he escaped injury. 

— Mr A. T. Allen, formerly principal of the 
Statesville graded school, now superintendent 
of the Salisbury graded school, was given a 
handsome present by the pupils of the Salis- 
bury school last week. In making note of the 
incident the society editor of the Salisbury Post 
says: — "Sterling silver was most suitably 
chosen to convey to this man of such fine and 
sterling qualities the apreciation of his efforts 
for the thousand children whom he guides as 
friend and adviser. During the years of faith- 
ful service the school learned to know how its 
leader moves — 

" 'How modest, kindly, all-accomplished, wise, 
With that sublime repression of himself, 
And in what limits and how tenderly — ■ 
Not swaying to this faction or to that-'' 

"And the gift this morning was an almost 
involuntary tribute in recognition of his 
worth." This will be pleasing news to Mr. 
Allen's friends in Statesville and in Alexander 
county, his native home. It is a pleasure to 
know that his work is appreciated and that he 
is attaining in Salisbury the success he deserves 
— Statesville Landmark. 

— The committee appointed by our Annual 
Conference to organize an insurance associa- 
tion for insuring church property met at the 
Advocate office on the night of December 30. 
There were present, Revs. C. W- Byrd, J. W. 
Jones, John F. Kirk and H. M. Blair of the 
clerical members of the committee, and John 
A. Young, of the lay members. Mr. B. F. 
Womble, of Winston, was present to repre- 
sent his father, Rev. W. F. Womble, who could 
not be present. Mr. Charles Wallace, of More- 
head City, was also present to consult with 
our committee with reference to co-operation 
on the part of the North Carolina Conference. 
Mr. James R. Young, State Insurance Commis- 
sioner, met with the committee to advise with 
regard to organization, charter, etc. After 
thorough deliberation it was agreed to refer the 
matter of formulating charter and by-laws to 
a special committee of three who, together with 
Commissioner Young, will draft these and re- 
port to a later meeting to be held in Raleigh at 
a later date in connection with the North Caro- 
lina Conference committee. We have no doubt 
the organization will be launched in due time 
and that it will prove a great advantage to 
our churches and preachers. 



January 8, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS FOR ADVO- 
CATE SUBSCRIBERS 

1. That I will look right now at the lahel 
on my paper. 

2. If the date is past I will stop right where 
I am and send a check or money order for the 
amount due and for a year in advance. 

3. That I will not again impose on the pub- 
lishers by accepting the paper from year to 
year without paying for it. 

4. I will hereafter consider the Advocate as 
a part of my annual church budget and pay 
the subscription just as promptly as I pay other 
church dues. 



GREENSBORO COLLEGE FOR WOMEN 

We have before us the current issue of the 
quarterly bulletin of Greensboro College for 
Women. Many evidences of progress are in- 
dicated, notably in the music department and 
the new departments of education and domes- 
tic science. We also note that Rev. S. B. Tur- 
rentine, D. D., the new president, will be form- 
ally inuagurated on the 18th of March. This 
will no doubt be an occasion of great interest 
to Greensboro and the friends of the College 
throughout the State. 

College exercises were resumed this week 
after two weeks of holiday rest. 



CONFERENCE EVANGELIST 

To the preachers in the Western North Caro- 
lina Conference : 

I have been appointed Conference Evangel- 
ist. This was gladly received by me. I feel 
called to give my time to this work, but I can- 
not do it all in warm weather, and want to 
do some of it right away. My observation has 
been that some of the very best meetings arc 
held in winter. Where there is no sacrifice 
the work is a failure. Any time is a good time 
if the preachers and people work together for i 
revival. 

Just before Conference I conducted a meet- 
ing at Crestmont and nearly 100 souls profess- 
ed faith in Christ. Much of the time it was 
raining or snowing. 

Now, brethren, especially those in towns where 
we have comfortable churches or where any 
place may be had where we may be made com- 
fortable, let's get to work and do something 
to save lost souls and build up our Master's 
Kingdom. Don't let the financial part bother 
you; that will take care of itself. Wherever 
the work is done God takes care of His work- 
ers. I am not afraid of that part. Only let 
me come and help- 

Yours for a thousand souls this year, 

J. J. Barker, 
Conference Evangelist. 



ORGANIC UNION 

There are serious difficulties in the way of 
uniting the Northern and Southern branches 
of Methodism in one organic body. The prob- 
abilities are that the Northern Methodists will 
elect a negro bishop in 1916 ; and, unless their 
Annual Conferences vote to change their con- 
stitution so that negro bishops may hold negro 
conferences only, he will have full power to 
preside in white Conferences. There are other 
constitutional questions, such as the conditions 
of receiving members, the time limit, the presid- 
ing eldership, fixing the residence of bishops, 
number of delegates to General Conference, lay 
representation, laity rights, etc., that we differ 
on to a considerable extent. 

How changing our name to anything will help 
us to unite organically is a marvelous mystery 
to me. 

As to eliminating our bishops that we may 
unite — surely that is a joke by the "Dixie 
Methodist- ' ' We need both bishops and presid- 
ing elders ; but they should be men of God who 
consider themselves co-laborers and fellow-ser- 
vants with the pastors, and not hired bosses. 

Gold Hill, N. C. John M. Price. 



NEW DAY IN EVANGELISM NOT AC- 
CEPTED 

In the Advocate of Christmas Day you gave 
us "The New Day in Evangelism." Do you 
accept it? I do not. While there is much 
that is good, there is much to which I object. 

Let us have the New Day, the personality, the 
arithmetical progression — get down and get it 
— reach tip and receive it ; but the new doctrine 
of the effects of sin and the chief business of 
the church — I would forbear. 

I would not call to my fellows that "God 
would make them as though they had not sin- 
ned" — no; I could not. But I would tell them 
that their sins are all forgiven, their condemna- 
tion passed over and life is given. 

To turn unto God is to live. To accept 
Christ is to be born again — to start life over — 
not what was before Adam, but what is before 
a Christian, whose very sins have been made 
to work together for his good. 

John the Baptist was the greatest in the old 
dispensation, but the least in the Kingdom is 
greaer than he. 

Adam, sinless and holy, was blessed in Para- 
dise, but a Christian cherishes that which eye 
hath not seen nor tongue can tell — a joint heir 
with Christ in His coming kingdom. Then I 
cannot see that we should change from seeking 
the lambs. No, I never have been able to see 
why we should not always, first and last, seek 
the lost. That is following in His footsteps. 

Feed the lambs is all right. What natural, 
humane mother would not feeed her child? 

A church that seeks the lost most is the church 
that feeds the lambs best. 

W. T. Cutchin. 



AN OPEN LETTER TO THE GENERAL 
CONFERENCE DELEGATE 

Dear Brother : 

I beg the favor of a word with you. Excuse 
my anonymous address. I wish this appeal to 
reach you on its simple merits, neither helped 
nor hindered by the personal equation. 

I am concerned about our church. Of ° n ■ 
we are doing well, but we have done and can 
do again so much better. We are in danger of 
losing our old place at the head of the proces- 
sion. With our biblical, up-to-date, preachable 
doctrines, this should not be. 

I feel the trouble is with our church govern- 
ment. It was a magnificent thing for pioneer 
work, but it does not just fit present conditions. 
Formerly we could well put the emphasis on 
leadership ; now we must put it on the response 
of the rank and file. The partnership must be 
enlarged. The great body of our preachers and 
people must come into the firm. The large op- 
portunity, the heavy responsibility, must be 
shared by all. 

Let me, your brother, make a few suggestions : 

1. Give the Church Conference power to 
elect all the lay members of the Quarterly Con- 
ference. Let the whole machinery, especially 
our electoral chain, begin with the people. 

2. Give the women of the church the "laity 
rights" for which they ask. 

3. Give the preachers, too, a larger share 
and stake in the administration. Let the An- 
nual Conference elect the presiding elders, and 
make them ineligible for more than four years' 
consecutive service. 

4. Make the bishop and presiding elders 
jointly responsible for the appointments. 

5. Do away with the "ban of secrecy" upon 
the cabinet work. Let everything be accessible, 
if not open. Fix responsibility definitely ; and 
make it responsive to the Conference esprit de 
corps. 

I do not undertake to argue with you — only 
beg that you will prayerfully ponder these 
things. Yours in Christ, 

Methodist. 



WALNUT COVE 

We arrived at Walnut Cove Friday, Dec. 
12, and there was an automobile at the depot 
to convey the family to the parsonage, where we 
found warm fires and an excellent supper 
awaiting, and some of the members to wel- 
come us. We found that they had brought 
quite a supply of good things to eat, enough 
to last for some time. Then, they have been 
sending in things ever since. The members 
of the family received several gifts from the 
Christmas trees at Stokesburg and Palmyra. 
I have made one round. Much kindness has 
been shown us. Yours, 

E. J. Poe. 



LANDIS CIRCUIT 

We reached our new field of labor on the 
8th and found the people ready to receive us. 
The people gave us a warm reception and a 
good dinner and filled our pantry with good 
things. We are more than glad to be among 
such good people. We were to make our home 
at Landis, but after I came and looked over 
my work, we decided to move near the center. 
Tt is only six miles to two of my churches. We 
have a very good old country home to live in. 

We have five churches on this charge. I 
have preached at all of them and find them in 
good condition. We are hoping to have a good 
year. Pray for us. Yours in Christ, 

S. L. Owens. 



A POUNDING 

The preacher and his family were made to 
rejoice new year's night when a donation party, 
consisting of some of the elect laides and a 
few of the brethren, of the Stanley church, 
stormed the parsonage with an old time pound- 
ing. It was a delightful evening indeed. It 
is always pleasant to have the people visit the 
parsonage; and when they come in such a sub- 
stantial way makes it more pleasant. Then they 
brought the very things we were most in need 
of. Even the faithful horse was not forgotten. 
About all the preacher could think to say was, 
''I wish you all much joy." But after recov- 
ering a little form the shock he was able to 
say, "call again." May the good Lord greatly 
bless and enrich the. lives of these noble people 
and make me helpful to them. 

E. N. Crowder. 

Stanley, N. C. 



NORTH LENOIR 

This work as it now stands was formed from 
a part of the Lenoir circuit and a part of the 
Caldwell circuit — three churches from each. 
From the Caldwell circuit we have Cedar Val- 
ley, Mt. Hermon and Ebenezer; and from the 
Lenoir circuit we have Harpers Chapel, Mt. 
Zion and Maria's Chapel. This charge is just 
a little over one year old. For the last year 
it made a very good record — paying most of 
its financial obligations and having a net gain 
of 40 in membership. 

The new year has started off in a very hope- 
ful way. Our people have kindly rememberer 
us during the Christmas holidays by many 
gifts, for which we are grateful. We are serv- 
ing a kind and loyal people and we are glad 
that we have been returned for another year's 
work. 

We are planning to re-cover and remodel one 
of our churches, and also we are planning to 
build one new church. This is a great field for 
work. There is much that needs to be done. 
Our Sunday schools need to be better organiz- 
ed and more progressive. Then there are many 
outside of the churches who ought to be reach- 
ed and saved. We are praying for gracious 
revivals in which many shall be saved and 
brought into the church. Advancement ought 
to be made along all lines. J. C. Keever. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 8, 1914 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mrs. Vtf. R. Harris, Aahevllla, N. C. 



ANOTHER YEAR IS DAWNING 
Another year is dawning; 

Dear Master, let it be 
In working or in waiting 

Another year with Thee. 

Another year of progress, 

Another year of praise, 
Another year of proving 

Thy presence all the days. 

Another year of service, 

Of witness for Thy love; 
Another year of training 

For holier work above. 

— Frances Ridley Havergal. 



THE NEW YEAR 

A flower unblown, a book unread, 
A tree with fruit unharvested; 
A path untrod, a house whose rooms 
Lack yet the heart's divine perfumes; 
A landscape whose wide border lies 
In silent shade 'neath silent skies; 
A wonderful fountain yet unsealed, 
A casket with its gifts concealed — 
This is the year that for you waits 
Beyond tomorrow's mystic gates. 

— Selected. 



The many friends throughout the 
Conference of Mrs. J. E. Ray, of Ashe- 
ville, will be interested in the thoughts 
(or the New Year which she sends to 
lis. For years Mrs. Ray was the vice- 
president of the Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Conference, and previous to 
her election she was for a long time 
the district secretary of the Asheville 
district. Her heart is full of love for 
the missionary work, and her life is 
one of loving service to her Master. 



REVIEW OF GOD'S MERCIES 
Mrs. J. E. Ray 

In the story of the children of Is- 
rael as they were led by Jehovah's 
hand through that "great and terrible 
wilderness" which lay between Horeb 
and Kadesh-Barnea; Moses pauses to 
lift his voice both in warning and 
blessing, ere he bids hs people enter 
in upon possession of their promised 
land of inheritance. 

First, he graphically portrays the 
divine "motif" for their selection as 
His own "peculiar treasure" among 
the nations of the earth; then the 
why of their separation for testing 
and proving as his very own, and the 
why of each delayed stop by the way. 

Heaven and earth are called to give 
ear to this final song of Moses setting 
forth his review of God's merciful pur- 
pose in training them to be the agent's 
for the divine blessing to the world. 

Through all these words are shad- 
owed lessons for us. It is said, in- 
deed, that the whole record prefigures 
the journey of the organized church 
of God through the wilderness of life 
to our heavenly goal of eternal Sabbatic 
rest — in God's rest. 

A thoughtful reader of this Mosaic 
story will be able to trace many per- 
sonal likenesses in lives of Christian 
experience by whch they have been 
led, along with general similitudes for 
the church. To those who walk by 
faith and not by sight the pillar of 
cloud by day and the pillar of fire by 
night still leadeth after God, through 
all life's journeyings. These can in- 
dividualize for themselves the record 
of eras. 

But let us note one practical lesson 
of Israel's story which we might heed. 
It is voiced in the reiterated call of 
Jehovah trrough Moses to His people 
for a c a reful introspective look within 
when through many lapses from fidel- 
ity they were bidden to halt by the 
way. Again just before the great host 
were to be entrusted with a new ad- 
vance, the higher advance in under- 
standing of "doctrines to be distilled 
as the dew" was patiently given by 
their leader. 



In this continuous review of God's 
mercy was an appeal to the natural 
reverent instinct of humanity, as an 
ancestral faith in the "God of their 
Fathers," the God who gave unto their 
fathers most precious promises and 
who should be for them the God of 
all fulfillment. That primal faith still 
survives for us in the song — "The Old- 
time Religion is Good Enough for Me." 

For our Jewish brethren In their 
pathetic clinging to their own tradi- 
tions of the one true God, let us re- 
member "that the gifts and calling of 
God are without repentance — and that 
God is able to graft them in again," 
"into their own olive tree,'' where we 
are now bearing fruit instead of the 
natural branches. 

That grateful task of co-working 
with God for those who yet abide in 
unbelief is a part of our Christian 
missions. 

But what review shall we emphasize 
this closing of the year of our Lord, 
1913? What is the forecast for the 
year 1914? Where falls the shadow 
on the dial of time for our Woman's 
Missionary Work? 

What hath God wrought for us and 
through us for the world's redemp- 
tion since our organization as a fac- 
tor in the church since 1878? 

There are differences of administra- 
tion, but there is one Lord and there 
should be one spirit over and in all. 
Where shall you and I find place in 
the ranks and go forward? 

In retrospect we have reason to ex- 
claim, God was very present in our 
call and our first outgoing. He hath 
been present all the way. "Surely 
goodness and mercy have followed me 
all the days of my life for — there hath 
not failed one word of all His good 
promise which He promised. 



FROM OUR THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT 
Mount Airy, N. C. 

Dear Friends: — 

The January meeting is to be given 
especially to the department of Stew- 
ardship and Mission Study and there 
are several very important points to 
which I wish to call your attention. 

Mrs. Perry urges that we set a 
higher standard for this new year and 
says "the program and literature for 
that month is sent out with the prayer 
that the Holy Spirit may accompany 
it with convicting power of individual 
responsibility," she also makes some 
splendid suggestions. 

First, that we try to have every 
woman in the church present at the 
January meeting, at least, let every 
one have a special invitation to be 
present. 

Second, that every one be given an 
opportunity to make a pledge for the 
year. Special cards have been prepar- 
ed and each auxiliary may order trom 
Miss Mabel Head's office at Nashville, 
Tenn., a sufficient number of pledge 
cards to supply their members 

Third, appoint a committee to dis- 
tribute these cards, the same commit- 
tee being asked to collect them and 
turn them over to the treasurer. 

The Young People's Societies may 
use the same cards, substituting the 
words "Membership Offering" for 
"Dues." 

Mrs. Perry further suggests that we 
ask our pastors to preach on Chris- 
tian Stewardship the first Sunday in 
the new year, or as near then as pos- 
sible. 

There will be no new leaflet for 
our department this quarter. The reg- 
! ular January leaflet is on Steward- 
| ship. 

And now may I ask those who read 
this to make it a point to find out 
if your mission study classes, libra- 
ries and prayer circles have been re- 
ported to me this quarter, and if not, 
see that the report is sent at once. 



Remember also study classes must be 
reported to Miss Head. 
Wishing you the joy and happiness 
of the season, 

Cordially yours, 

Cora L. Earp, 
Conference Third Vice-pres. 



AN EFFECTIVE LETTER 

The Woman s Missionary Society at 
Weaverville is a band of faithful work- 
ers. At the beginning of this month, 
fearing there might be a shortage in 
their pledge money, the following let- 
ter was written by their press superin- 
tendent, Mrs. C. A. Wood, and mailed 
to each member of the auxiliary. We 
give it, hoping it may be the means 
of arousing some other member of 
some other society whose pledge is 
not paid in full: 

"In celebrating this joyous Christ- 
mas season by sending gifts to our 
friends and best loved, would not the 
Owner of the birthday appreciate a 
remembrance from us. And how could 
we please Him better than by sending 
it to those into whose life least love 
has come? Love, peace, good "will, 
were God's gifts to all the world, but 
more than one hundred a n d twenty 
nine millions have not yet heard this 
message of goodness entrusted to us 
to deliver. 

In our security, freedom and pros- 
perity it is impossible for us to com- 
prehend the bare, desolate and love- 
less life of a heathen woman. Beside 
the sorrow incidental to her position 
in the home, her life is without stim- 
ulus from without, without resources 
of an improved mind,, without the 
printed page, without help in sickness, 
without uope in death. 

In her dark life the good news of 
the gospel comes like a veritable door 
into heaven, a window thrown wide 
through which the light streams for 
soul and mind. 

Does not the Master tmst us to pass 
on to her what we have received? Is 
not our debt to the heathen the larg- 
est debt we owe? I feel that we have 
been selfish this year in using up so 
much of the enthusiasm of our mis- 
sionary societies in our local work and 
have sacrificed these larger interests. 

Can we not redeem the eleventh 
hour and give liberally on our annual 
voluntary pledge offering. A Christ- 
mas worthy the Princely Giver who 
gave so largely to us 1913 years ago. 



A NEW YEAR'S DAY EXERCISE 

Read this slowly and think. 
Does my life please God, 
Am I enjoying my Christian life? 
Is there any one I can forgive? 
How Huch time do I spend in pray- 
er? 

Am I trying to bring my friends 
to Christ? 

Is there anything I cannot give up 
for Christ? 

How does my life look to those who 
are not Christians? 

Is the world being made better or 
worse by my living in it? 

Have I ever tried giving one-tenth 
of my income to the Lord? 

Am I doing any thing I would con- 
demn in others? 

— Canadian Churchman. 



The ninth day of January is the 
one to be observed especially by prayer 
in the interest of woman's work. Pray 
that the Christian women of the world 
may prove equal to their share of the 
work in evangelizing the world. 



HEROES OF COMMONPLACE 

To you who have achieved, many 
will wish a Happy New Year. For 
you who are facing success on a se- 
cure upward path, you who are warm- 
ed by the sunshine of human inter- 
course and strong with the joy of 
life, a Happy New Year is all but 
assured. To you who face a life crisis 
with the prosperous outlook of sue- 
cuss beyond, to you in whom hope has 
steeled determination even in the pres 
ence of the fiercest obstacles, the New 
Year promises well. 



To you others whom the angel of 
grief through the passing years has 
folded in so close an embrace that 
your eyes have not caught the gleam 
of his wings or known that they were 
blessed, the new year will bring a 
tender ministration that is Time's own 
privilege. 

But what horoscope is there for each 
in that great army of the unknown 
heroes who face no bracing ordeal 
nor promise of physical or moral cheer; 
who with faces set towrd tomorrow 
see no light, no warmth, but the same 
pitiless world that has been their lot 
for years! 

And yet these smile brightly. They 
are the ones who fill the chinks of 
life and shut out - for us an often 
chilly world; they are the apostles of 
the little things, the despised things, 
whose sacrifices we accept with as 
slight thought as we bestow on the 
things themselves. Yet they are the 
links which hold the world together 
— Collier's Weekly. 



NEW YEAR IN THE FAR EAST 

In Japan the new year is welcomed 
with far more energy than in this 
country. Let a man's energy be ever 
so defective, he is expected to rise at 
4 A. M. and don new clothes to meet 
the auspicious morning. Then with 
his gala garments in due order, he 
worships the gods, performs obeisance 
to the spirits of his ancestors and 
pays homage to all relations older 
than himself. No ordinary viands are 
consumed at breakfast. The tea must 
be made from water drawn from the 
well as the first rays of the New 
Year's sun strikes it. On every table 
figures a red lacquer tray, covered 
with evergreen leaves and supporting 
a rice dumpling, a lobster, oranges, 
persimmons, chestnuts, dried sardines 
and herring root; all of these dishes 
possess an allegorical signification. 
This meal is the start of the festivi- 
ties, which are continued for sixteen 
days, business being almost entirely 
suspended for the first week of the 
new year. — Selected. 



Moving Onward in Mexico 

The attention of the people in the 
Northwest Mexican Mission Confer- 
ence is so absorbed in affairs in Mex- 
ico that it is difficult to turn it to 
spiritual things. We have been dong 
faithful work, preaching the word, dis- 
tributing tracts and visiting. Some 
fruits are beginning to be seen in in- 
creased attendance at the services and 
a warmer spiritual atmosphere. I 
have recently visited Marathon and 
Toyah and, besides the third quarter- 
ly conferences, held special services 
in both places. At the former place 
the success was most encouraging. 
There were a number of professions of 
faith. Several gave spontaneous tes- 
timony. Ten offered themselves as 
candidates for membership-. When 
last heard from both the church and 
school at Chihuahua were prospering. 
—J. H. Fitzgerald, El Paso, Texas. 



Climbing in Korea 

The increase in self-support on the 
Songdo district has been a very grat- 
ifying feature of the year's work. Con- 
tributions for the support of the min- 
istry have increased from 372.61 yen 
last year to 592.51 yen this year — a 
gain of 59 per cent.; and the total 
contributions from 1248.07 yen last 
year to 3058.73 yen this year — a gain 
of 145 per cent. In every case the 
full amount pledged for the support 
of the ministry at the beginning of 
the year has been paid and in every 
case but one there is a surplus in 
hand with which to beginthenewyear. 
The time is not far distant when we 
shall have several circuits that will 
assume the entire support of their 
preachers. — F. K. Gamble, Songdo, 
Korea. 



"A charge to keep I have; 

A God to glorify; 
A never dying soul to save 

And fit it for the sky." 



January 8, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Epworth League Department 

Conducted by Miw A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. C. 



THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT 
By a Leaguer 

The night was dark and cold and 
the first vice-president shivered as 
she started on her way to the Christ- 
mas meeting of the League. Would 
there be anyone there she wondered. 
Everybody was so busy these last few 
days before Christmas. Some had sug- 
gested that the meeting be called in, 
but she had set her heart on this 
Christmas meeting and had planned 
her program many weeks before. She 
had put her whole heart in the work 
in an effort to bring out the true 
Christmas spirit. After much effort 
and disappointment, she had secured 
the promise of sufficient help to carry 
out her programme. Would those who 
had promised to itake part in the 
meeting come? Would the meeting 
be a success? She had had so many 
disappointments that even now, she 
feared that the meeting would be a 
failure. If it was she would give 
up her League work. She breathed 
a silent prayer for help. 

The League room was warm and 
cozy and the light shone through the 
windows with kindly welcome. She 
found a few there before her, but still 
there were not near as many as she 
had hoped. 

Just before the meeting opened a 
stranger came in. The thoughtful 
first vice-president stepped forward to 
meet him and to bid him welcome. 
He was a young man, but his face 
was sad and he had a discontented 
expression. "Your light shone out so 
inviting that I thought there must 
bee good cheer on the inside. I, who 
am a stranger in a strange city, come 
to you tonight looking for a message 
of good will and peace." "You are 
most heartily welcome. We are al- 
ways glad to have the strangers with 
us, and especially at this Christmas 
time. I hope that our meeting may 
bring to you the true Christmas spirit 
of cheer and comfort for which you 
say you seek," she replied. 

As the hour for opening the meet- 
ing came, the last of those on the 
programme came in. "Oh! May, we 
were just so busy we did not have a 
minute to spare, but we had promis- 
ed, so we just took time." 

The opening prayer by the leader, 
asking God's blessing on the little 
company who had left their many 
duties at home to gather for an hour 
of worship. Also that His presence 
be with them during the meeting and 
that each one should leave with the 
true Christmas spirit in his heart. 

The fsrogramme told all about God's 
promise to send a Savior into the 
world and the fulfillment of that 
promise. How God sacrificed His on- 
ly begotten Son for our salvation and 
how the Christ child was received. 
It gave a picture of what this world 
would have been had not Christ come 
and what the coming of Christ has 
meant to all the world. The music 
was the kind that reaches the heart. 
It also emphasized the duty and priv- 
ilege of each Christian to help carry 
the message of "Peace on earth, good 
will to men" to those who have heard 
it not. The meeting closed with a 
sentence prayer in which the stranger 
joined most fervently. 

As they rose to leave, the stranger 
said, "My friends, for indeed you are 
my friends after this meeting, before 
you leave this house of God I want 
to tell you a Christmas story. It is 
the story of my life. 

"I am the only son of a minister 
of God. It has ever been my father's 
wish that I too should be a minister and 
I had felt the call in my heart and 
was preparing myself for a life of 
service to God. Last year I went to 
one of our cities to finish my studies. 
There I attended and joined the League 



in one of the largest churches of the 
city. I entered into the Leabue work 
enthusiastically and they elected me 
first vice-priesdent. I planned for the 
year's work with a joyous heart. I 
expected to do so much for God in 
that band of young people. But, alas, 
my first meeting put a damper on 
my spirits. I could get very little 
help, and no one seemed to take any 
interest in the programme. Those 
who at last promised me to take part 
in the meeting did not oome, as there 
was some other attraction in town 
that night. The next meeting was 
about as bad. This went on for a 
few months until Christmas came. I 
had hoped that at this season of 
good will I could get some of them 
interested, but I could not even get 
one to promise to come. I resigned 
and quit the League. Doubt was be- 
ginning to grow in my heart. Was 
it worth the effort? Was Christian- 
ity what it is supposed to be? What 
was religion anyway? I began to see 
only the discouragements and the 
dark side of the work. At last I de- 
cided that I would give up my work 
as a minister. This nearly broke my 
father's heart. But nothing he could 
say could convince me that there was 
a brighter side to the work. I knew, 
for I had tried. At last I became 
restless and left home. For the past 
three months I have been going from 
place to place seeking the peace and 
comfort which I once felt. I have 
tried all kinds of amusements and 
pleasure, but they only left my heart 
heavier. I have shunned the house 
of God. I have made myself believe 
that religion was all a fake. My moth- 
er and father have tried to help me. 
I know that they have prayed for 
me each day, that I may turn back 
to God. I had made up my mind to- 
day never to go back home, for I 
could not bear the sadness in their 
faces. 



Tonight when I saw the light from 
this room something seemed to say 
in my heart, 'Here you will find peace 
and comfort.' I want to tell you that 
I have found peace and joy, which 
only comes through consecrated work 
for our God. I am going home to my 
narents tonight with a heart full of 
love for all mankind and tell them of 
this meeting and what it has done 
for me. The first of the year I will 
resume my studies preparatory to 
becoming a minister of God. Pray 
for me that I may have through God's 
heln strength to withstand all doubts 
and fears. You can never know how 
much good your presence here tonight 
has done. All my future usefullness 
will be your reward for giving this 
one hour to God's service. Let us 
remember that what we do for God 
is never fruitless. Though it may 
seem to be a failure at first, some 
srood will come of it later. Pray for 
me." 

Everone left the meeting agreeing 
that it was indeed good to have been 
there, and resolved to be more faith- 
ful Leaguers in the future than they 
had been in the past. As the stranger 
shook hands with the first vice-pres- 
ident f)t her door, he said, "I owe to 
you whatever peace and joy may be 
mine in the future. I sympathize 
with you in your work and will pray 
that you may never be overcome by 
disappointment and trial as I was. 
I will never forget you and some day 
I hope to see you again." 

If you go to the city where the 
stranger first lost his faith in God, 
you will find him pastor of the very 
church where his indifference to God's 
work came so near spoiling his whole 
life. There is a live and flourishing 
League there, whose members never 
allow any other pleasure to interfere 
with their League work. This young 
pastor has given to the church a new 




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Methodism. 



Particulars of the plan will be sent to any one interested by 
BOARD OF MISSIONS 
^ 810 BROADWAY NASHVILLE, TENN. 



idea of religion — the religion of ser- 
vice. He says that whatever success 
he has achieved in his work is due 
to his consecrated wife — she whose 
earnest desire to implant the true 
Christmas spirit in the heart of her 
League friends, overcame many diffi- 
culties and led the Christmas meet- 
ing on that memorable night several 
years before when the stranger again 
found his God. 




Noiseless, dust-proof, self -collecting, saves K 
cost other services. Uses shallow glass — no 
tipping of head. Our Special Introductory 
Offer makes purchase easy. Outfits on trial 
— state number of communicants, 
Thomas Communion Service Co., Box < - , T Lima, Ohio 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 8, 1914 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted b» Walter Thompson, SnpeifattntfeBt 



CHRISTMAS AT THE HOME 

Christmas has oome and is gone. 
The acknowledgments in these (col- 
umns give the outline of the story. 
The Methodists and others -were more 
than good to us. It began with the 
Christmas exercises at West End Mon- 
day night. Our folks attend Sunday 
school and church here. The exer- 
cises were good. Our girls and boys 
took part and rendered their songs 
well. At the close each child was 
given a box containing the usual 
Christmas "fixings" and a large quan- 
tity left over was sent to the Home. 

Wednesday the Amuzu Theatre m a n 
had our children as his guests at a 
very fine moving picture show, and 
gave each of them an orange and a 
bag of candy when the show was 
over. 

Wednesday and Thursday land Fri- 
day and on boxes began to oome in 
until we had enough and to spare. 
The small boys observed the occasion 
in the conventional way — enough horns 
having arrived to give each small boy 
one. From a bout 4 o'clock Christmas 
morning until the instruments were 
used up we had tim music in abun- 
dance. 

And the dinner was good. There 
were some turkeys left from those 
sent from West End Thanksgiving. To 
these Hon. Cyrus B. Watson added 
two. These with the necessary trim- 
mings gave a fine dinner. 

And a day or two later Pearson's 
Bakery sent over 400 cinnamon buns 
and quite a lot of bread. To this add 
the dolls, knives, hair ribbons, ties, 
books, and other things and we have 
what the children say is their best 
Christmas. 

As you will see, there were other 
gifts of money, acknowledged in our 
financial report, which the donors de- 
clared must not be reported by name. 

Rev. G. D. Herman, of Wadesboro, 
said to the Superintendent at Confer- 
ence: "I am going to stand by you." 
Christmas morning brought his check 
for $180.00. This pays the ten per 
cent, of his church for the year. It 
seems the pastor made his word good. 

Thursday at the Liberty our chil- 
dren were the guests of the manage- 
ment at moving pictures and an ex- 
hibition of finely trained dogs. 

To everybody who in any way 
brightened the season for us, we re- 
turn our most cordial thanks. 



RECEIVED ON TEN PER CENT., 
SPECIAL AND GENERAL SUP- 
PORT, FOR WEEK ENDING 
JANUARY 3, 1913 

Rev. G. A. B. Holderby, W. Con- 
cord ct, $5.65; F. S. Morg a n, Holmes 
Memorial, Salisbury, $10.84; Rev. S. 
E. Richardson, E. Spencer and N. 
Main, $8.00; W. T. Penry, Capt. Raw- 
ley's Class, special support, $83.34; 
R. D. Hicks, Cliffside S. S., Christ- 
mas gift, $5.00, and Jr. Barac a and 
Jr. Philathea classes, $5.00, Christmas 
gift; R. S. Walker, Landis church, 
Christmas gift, $3.63; C. F. iCline, 
Gilkey S.S., Christmas gift, $10.00; 
J. W. Dayvault, China Grove S. S., 
Christmas gift, $3.90; Miss Ruth John- 
son, Madison S. S., class No. 4, Christ- 
mas gift, 80c; Geo. P. Phillips, Spring 
Garden St., Greensboro, Christmas 
gift, $30.75; Miss Myrtle Sheppard, 
Hopewell Epworth League, Christmas 
gift, $1.15; J. H. Allen, for A. E. and 
J. B. Jones, $4.10; total $172.16. 



Chapel S. S., Watauga, $3.00; W. B. 
Marsh, Gilboa S. S., Gilboa, $1.40; 
total, $17.55. 



DONATION FOR WEEK ENDING 
JANUARY 3, 1913 

Miss Essie Ford, Bethesda church, 
1 box clothing, home made carpet, 
etc.; Miss Maude McKinnon, class lit- 
tle girls, Tryon St., Charlotte, box 
Christmas gifts; Jenny Wren Sewing 
Club, Polkton, box dolls, etc.; Golden 
Link Class, Tryon St., Charlotte, box 
clothing; Mrs. T. C. Jordan, Lilesville, 
1 box clothing, etc; Nannie L. Harper, 
Guilford College, for Mrs. W. C. Boren, 
C. A. Boren H. A. McNairy, John 
Davis, Mrs. T. W. Hancock, Mrs. W. 
Edwards, Mrs. Edmeson, 1 box cloth- 
ing, stockings, handkerchiefs, etc.; W. 
M. Knight, Stokesdale, Mt. Zion, 2 
bags flour; Mrs. A. N. Perkins, L. E. 
O. Philathea class, Tryon St., Char- 
lotte, box of clothing; Spring Garden 
St., Greensboro, big lot of clothing, 
groceries, fruit, etc.; Lexington Sun- 
day school, 4 big boxes dry goods, 
fruits, etc.; Asheboro Sunday school, 
lig box assorted goods, shoes, etc.; 
(No name on box)' big box fruit, etc.; 
W. M. S. Biltmore, 4 boxes canned 
fruit; (No name on Box — Salisbury?), 
box fruit, dry goods, stockings, etc.; 
barrel fruit, packages, etc., Lexington; 
'iox containing rug, dry goods, notions, 
etc., from Woman's Missionary Society 
and Sunday school at Jamestown; box 
stockings, towels, etc., from Central 
church, Concord. 



Methodist Benevolent Association 

The Connecttonal Brotherhood of Ministers and Laymen. Life or Term Certificates from $z;o to $2,000. Bene- 
fits payable at death, old ate, or disability. $140,000 paid to widows, orphans, and disabled. $2Z,ooo reserve 
fund. Write for rates, blanks, etc. J. H. Shumakor, Secretary, Nashville. Twin. 



FIFTH SUNDAY COLLECTIONS 

First Honor Roll 

Lexington . '. $40.00 

Tyron St., Charlotte <>5.00 

Broad St., Statesville 25.00 

Reidsville 23.89 

Mt. Airy, Central 20.31 

hickory 20 00 

Central, Albemarle 25.00 

Second Honor Roll 

Bethel, Morven 10.00 

Newton lO'OO 

Marion ■ 11.54 

Washington St., High Point .. 15.80 

Concord, Central 10.76 

Seversville, Charlotte 11.13 

Morganton station 10.29 



RECEIVED ON FIFTH SUNDAY COL- 
LECTIONS FOR WEEK END- 
ING DECEMBER 27, 1913 

Miss Clem Maxley, Turnersburg S. 
S., Iredell, $6.00; Mr. Jas. A. Weisner, 
Olin S. S., $2.00; F. H. Washburn, 
Tryon St., Charlotte, $35.00; Wm. Line- 
berger, Shelby S. S., Central, $4.96; 
J. D. Love, Moores Grove S. S., $1.10; 
J. E. TayUor, 'benezer S. S <( Ran- 
dolph, $1.11; Willie Howard, Mock's 
S. S., Advance, $1.00; L. A| Rudasill 
New Hope S. S., Lowesville, $2.11; E. 
B. Claywell, Morganton station S.S., 
$10.29; W. H. Cartner, Cleveland S. S., 
$5.00; J. L. Fox, Alexander's ch a pel 
S. S., $2.00; Leroy Miller, Linwood 
ct., Cotton Grove S. S., $2.50; W. H. 
Hobson, Liberty S. S., Davie, $3.00; 
J. R. Hauser, Union S. S., Forsyth, 
65c; Frank Woosley, Pine Grove S. S., 
Forsyth, 52c; Rev. James Willson, 
Woodleaf S. S., Woodleaf, $1.00; total 
$76.24. 



RECEIVED ON FIFTH SUNDAY COL- 
LECTIONS 

Rev. S. E. Richardson, N. Main S. 
S., E. Spencer and N. Main, $1.05; 
Rev. R. C. Kirk, Mt. Zion S. S., Hay- 
wood ct., $3.10; J. S. Bell, Elkin S. 
S., Elkin, $9.00; N. L. Mast, Henson 



RECEIVED ON TEN PER CENT., 
CHRISTMAS OFFERINGS ETC., 
WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 
27, 1913 

Rev. A. L. Coburn, Epworth, $2.80 
and Center, 68c; Rev. W. E. Poovey, 
N. Asheville, $9.70; Taylor Bynum, 
Centenary, Winstoq,, $34.63; Sileiam 
church, Yadkinville ct., $25.00 (name 
unknown); Geo. D. Herman, Wades 
boro, $180.00; Rev. S. W. Brown, Lau- 
rel Springs church, $4.60; J. E. John- 
son, Morven ct., $40.00; C. B. Laney, 



Central, Monroe, $12.39, Christmas of- 
fering; a friend, Mechanic, Christmas 
offering, $1.00; Miss Jessis Rogers, 
Christmas offering, $3.00; V. A. J. Idol, 
Washington St., High Point, Christ- 
mas gift, $17.70; Frank Gurley, Christ- 
mas gift, $10.00; W. H. McCabe, Christ- 
mas gift, $10.00; Mrs. M. K. Lee's 
class girls, Monroe, Christmas gift, 
$10.25; Christmas offering $5.00 (re- 
quested name not to be published ; 
C. M. Bagwell, Christmas offering, 
$5.00; Oak Ridge Sunday school, 
Christmas offering, $2.00; Mr. and 
Mrs. E. H. Kochtitzky, Christmas of- 
fering, $5.00; friends in Winston, 
Christmas offering, $25.00; from farm 
at Home, 65c; total, $406.41. 



RECEIVED ON BUILDING FUND, 
J. H. WEST, AGENT 

Paid on Subscriptions 
Hickory: F. M. Thompson, $2.50; 
J. H. West, $5.00. Gastonia: R. B. 
Babington, $25.00. Total, $32.50. Paid 
on new subscription, $5.00. Grand to- 
tal, $37.50. 



DONATIONS RECEIVED — WEEK 
ENDING DECEMBER 27, 1913 

Mrs. D. S. Roberts, Biltmore M. E. 
church, 1 bed spread, one serge skirt; 
a Mooresville friend, 20 handker- 
shiefs; Mrs. Almeda Walker and Miss 
M a rtha McArgue, 1 quilt Mrs. J. M. 
Sloan, Gastonia, big assortment new & 
old clothing, etc.; Mrs. Minnie P. Vail, 
S. Main St., High Point, lot fruit, 
hose, sugar, clothing, etc.; Oak Ridge 
Sunday school, lot canned fruit, books, 
dress goods, etc.; Mrs. Annie Heath, 
Matthews, 1 box dry goods, etc.; Mrs. 
J. L. Fuguson, 2 quilts, one bed blan- 
:et; Mill Creek Sunday school, Raven, 
1 quilt; D. W. Alexander 1 New Home 
sewing machine; H. C. Jones, W. Sa- 
lem church, lot groceries, etc.; Mrs. 
H. M. Teague, Lenoir W. M. S., Christ- 
mas box for little girl; Miss Dora 
Coat's class, Reidsville, Christmas 
box for children; Girls' Senior Quar- 
terly class, Liberty 3 dozen handker- 
chiefs; Mrs. H. M. Jones, Primary class 
as follows: Minnie Dees, Jennie Rice, 
Edna Rice, Malcom Ford, Lominto z 
Rosette Brown, Sara Rigler, Cary May 
Jones, Addie Dillon, Gladys Green, R. 
B. Longston, Brevard tit., Charlotte, 
1 box hose and handkerchiefs from 
Doritha Lee Barefoot and Minnie 
Dees; Intermediate JPhilathea class, 
Ramseur, one excellent box clothing, 
toys, dolls, etc., one quilt and blan- 
ket; Washington St., High Point, 144 
pairs hose, toys dolls, and large assort- 
ment of Christmas articles; J. M. Todd, 
7 books; W. H. Willis, Central Sun- 
day school, Mt Airy, 2 boxes toys 
and a nice assortment of Christmas 
articles; Liberty Sunday school, Gold 
Hill ct., 1 quilt; Mrs. C. F. Sherrill, 
Mt. Pleasant, several pieces gingham 
dress goods, stockings, etc.; Sunshine 
Choir, Calvary church, Charlotte, 1 
nice box of Christmas goods and dry 
goods, etc.; Calv a ry church, 1 Christ- 
mas box, dry goods, etc. 



Loyalty to Christ Among the 
Chinese Nobility 

We have among our Sungkiang mem- 
bers a young Chinese woman whose 
life and example are worthy of thanks- 
giving to God. In the time of the 
Boxer outbreak in 1900 her father 
was a prominent official in Peking, 
and when the old Empress Dowager 
issued a decree ordering the expulsion 
and killing of all foreigners in China, 
this man was entrusted by her with 
the telegraphing of the decree to the 
viceroys and governors of the various 
provinces. Instead, however, of doing 
as he had been commanded by the 
Empress Dowager, he changed the 
wording of the decree so that it would 
read "protect" the foreigners, and it 



was as thus worded that her decree 
went forth, and the lives of hundreds 
of foreigners spared. Many of us who 
are now living and working for the 
Master would not be here now had it 
not been for the act of that one man. 
For his "treachery" the Empress Dow- 
ager had him put to death, and it is 
commonly reported that he was sawn 
asunder. His body was brought back 
to his native place, Sungkiang, and all 
the way en route it is said honor 
was shown it by those who were not 
of one mind with the Empress Dow- 
ager. This daughter was then young, 
and her education was placed in the ■ 
Susan B. Wilson School at Sung- 
kiang, and while there she learned 
something of Christianity and finally 
made open profession of her faith by 
uniting with our church. According 
to Chinese custom she had not much 
to do with the selection of her hus- 
band, so it came about that she was 
betrothed to the son of another wealthy 
and prominent official, Mr. Wu, who 
was serving under the old Manchu 
Dynasty, and in due time they were 
married. At the outbreak of the rev- 
olution against the Manchu Dynasty 
in 1911, her father-in-law was an act- 
ing official in a neighboring province, 
and as all officials of the Manchus were 
practically under the ban of the Re- 
formers his official residence and ya- 
men were burned, and he lost practi- 
cally all that he had. Thus on both 
sides riches had been lost and the 
family reduced to comparative medioc- 
rity. About two months ago Brother 
Tsa, our Chinese presiding elder, 
preached a sermon emphasizing the 
privilege and duty of the Chinese to 
do more for their own people, and 
among other things he mentioned the 
need of a new church at Sungkiang. 
Mrs. Wu was touched, and not long 
after the service she came to some 
of our ladies at Sungkiang with a 
negotiable note which had been left 
her by her father, that and her per- 
sonal jewels being practically all she 
had left in her own name. The note 
was not due until this October, but 
she asked that it be placed in safe 
keeping, for that, when it was collect- 
ed, she intended to give $1000 Mex- 
ican, which was a third of the note, 
to the church for a new building. The 
question was asked if her husband 
would raise any objection, and she 
replied that if he did she would sell 
her personal jewels and give the money 
to the church. When the time came to 
collect the money her husband did ob- 
ject, so she brought her jewels and 
asked that they bs held as security 
for the amount that she had promised. 
Evidently this must have brought her 
husband around, for within a few days 
she brought the thousand dollars, and 
it is now on deposit awaiting the use 
for which she contributed it. All of 
us feel that when the brothers and 
sisters of this brave young Christian 
who are in America know what she 
has done they will of their abundance 
give the balance of $3500 which is 
needed to make her gift effective. We 
are all praying that in the near future 
we shall have a church building at 
Sungkiang that will be an honor to 
God and at the same time be a proper 
equipment for the preaching and teach- 
ing of that gospel which has been able 
to make such a character out of this 
young Chinese woman. — J. A. G. Ship- 
ley, Shanghai, China. 



Claude Robeson 

ORGAN RECITALS 

New Organs Opened 

Teacher of Organ, Greensboro College 
for Women; Organist and Choirmaster 
West Market St. M. B. Church, Organist 
and Director Temple Emanuel. Address 

Greensboro College, Greensboro, N. C. 



January 8, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



Married 



On Dec. 10th, 8:30 p.m., at the home 
of the bride's brother-in-law, Mr. Wm. 
Forsyth, 318 Walker Avenue, Greens- 
boro, N. C, Miss Emma J. Hubbard, 
of Greensboro, and Mr. Alson L. All- 
red, of Jefferson township, Guilford 
county, N. C, W. S. Hales, the pasto r 
of the bride officiating. 

At the home of Mrs. Patty Needham, 
Greenville, S. C. Dec. 24th, 1913, Mr. 
H. S. Compton to Miss Margarett Wag- 
staff, Rev. Samuel L. Rogers officiat- 
ing. 

f * * * * 

At the Methodist parsonage in 
Stokesburg, Mr. Samuel A. Wall and 
Miss May Wall were united in matri- 
mony, Tuesday, Dec. 23rd, 1913, Rev. 
E. J. Poe offiiciating. The contract- 
ing parties both live in the community 
of Bethesda Methodist church, in 
Stokes county. 

$ * # # 

On Decembe r 29th, at the home of 
the bride in Forest City, Miss Reba 
Moore, daughter of Mrs. L. A. Moore, 
to Mr. Frank Carden, Rev. J. A. Bowles 
officiating. 

* * * * 

At Centenary Methodist church, 
Greensboro, Tuesday evening, Dec. 30, 
Mr. Chas. C. Langston ana Miss Mary 
Mcllhenny, Rev. R. D. Sherrill offici- 
ating. 

* * * # 

On the evening of Christmas day, 
at Centenary church, Greensboro, Mr. 
Sparger W. Boyles and Miss Maggie 
Waynick, Rev. R. D. Sherrill, the 
pastor of the church, officiating. Mr. 
and Mrs. Boyles will reside in Golds- 
boro. 

* * * * 

At Centenary church, on Wednes- 
day evening, December 31st, Miss Vir- 
ginia Townsend, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. C. Townsend, was happily mar- 
ried to Mr. P. A. Hayes. After a re- 
ception at the home of the bride's par- 
ents, on Arlington Street, the happy 
couple left for a wedding trip South. 

At the home of the bride's parents 
at Pioneer Mills, Cabarrus county, De- 
cember 24th, Miss Eloise Barnhardt 
to Mr. Charles E. Boger, Superinten- 
dent of the Stonewall Jackson Train- 
ing School, Rev. A. W. Plyler, of Lex- 
ington, brother-in-law of the bride offi- 
ciating. 

* * * * 

On January 1st, at Spencer, Miss 
Lillian Lanning, daughter of Rev. and 
Mrs. J. P. Lanning, to Mr. J. N. Coe, of 
Greensboro, Rev. J. P. Lanning, father 
of the bride, officiating. 

^ ^ '*" *■ 

At the Methodist parsonage in Ham- 
let, on Monday evening, Dec. 29th, Miss 
Edna Joyce Tuttle, daughter of Rev. 
and Mrs. M. H. Tuttle, to Mr. E. Mur- 
ray Bruner, of Louisville, Ky., the fath- 
er of the bride officiating. 

* * * * 

At the home of the bride, Reids- 
ville, N. C, on Saturday, December 
27th, Miss Myrtle Barber, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Barber, to Mr. J. 
C. Russell, of Norfolk, Va., Rev. A. J. 
Burrus officiating. 




SOMERS^Benjamin Franklin, fa- 
miliarly known as Frank. The de- 
ceased was born in Burke county, N. 
C, March 17th, 1884; died at Stony 
Point, N. C, Nov. 16th, 1913, aged 29 
years and 8 months; and is survived 
by his parents and one brother, A. 
A. Somers, of Stony Point, and four 
sisters, Mesdames W. D. Palmer, of 
Lubbock, Texas; M. L. Hidgins, Rich- 



MSffi ADVOCATE PIANO CLUB 



BEGINS ANOTHER YEAR 

The Advertising Manager of the North Carolina Christian Advocate and the Manager of 
the Club take this opportunity to jointly express their appreciation of the confidence and en- 
thusiastic support which they have received from the readers of this paper during the past 
year. We are glad to be able to report that we are more than pleased with the splendid success 
of the Club and that we begin the New Year without a single complaint or case of dissatisfac- 
tion on the part of the Club members. All have expressed themselves as delighted and this, of 
course, makes us delighted. fjJWe wish to thank old Club members for the many kind things 
they have written about the Club, the Club's instruments and the Club's management. When- 
ever we can be of further assistance to you or your friends, we hope that you will not hesitate 

.o can o„ us. ^ WORD TO NEW CLUB MEMBERS 

To those who need a good piano or player-piano for their home, but who have been waiting for some 
more convenient day, we wish to say that you will find the Club the most convenient and economical 
means of securing a thoroughly satisfactory instrument. The Club removes all necessity for further wait- 
ing. No matter where you live nor what your financial condition may be you should not hesitate to write 
at once for your copy of the Club's catalogue and full particulars. You will be pleased to find how easy, 
safe and convenient we have made your road to the possession of a high-grade piano or player-piano. 

READ THESE LETTERS FROM OLD MEMBERS 

"I have studied the plan very carefully and 
consider it a very liberal one. As to my piano, I 
consider it a splendid instrument and am proud 
to be in possession of it. 1 ' 

MRS. A. BRANNING, Bartow, Fla. 

"We purchased one of your Club pianos and 
are well pleased with it. Would not take any- 
thing for it. All who have heard it think it to 
be one of the grandest they have ever heard. 
While we were paying for it my husband died. 
You gave us a life insurance clause, we were still 
owing $125, which was nicely settled and our 
note was returned to us marked paid. We i hank 
you very much for your kindness and prompt 
attention, which you have shown to us. Any 
one who wants the best piano made should buy 
one of these. They will be pleased with it and 
will be treated nicely, as we were. We appreci- 
ate your kindness very much. ' ' 

MRS. J. A. BRAMLETT, Ecru, Miss. 

"Club piano received in good order. We are 
well pleased with it. Better and nicer than 
pianos sold here by agents for from $350 to $500. 
Our little town is pretty well stocked with pianos 
of different makes, and it is considered that we 
have the best piano in town. We thank you for 
your selection and prompt shipment." 

J. R. WILLIAMS, Gaylesville, Ala. 

' 'Your letter received some days ago, and will 
say tnat I will be only too glad to recommend 
my piano to the highest. 1 could not wish for 
more in a piano. The woodwork is beautiful 
and the tone is asswe t as can be. Every day I 
am prouder of it. I would not do without it for 
anything. As to your Club plan, I certainly 
think it is the very best way in which the pianos 
could be sold, and I feel, by joining the Club, I 
got a much better piano for the money than I 
could have anywhere else. Thanking you for 
kinduess. and for the beautiful calendar I re- 
ceived from you, I am." MISS ROSA EDNA 
BROWN, Blowing Rock. N. C. 

"The Ludden & Bates Piano that I purchased 
of you continues to give entire satisfaction. Its Write for handsomely 
tones are exceedingly sweet and do not give way beautiful styles of Pianos 
under the changes of season and climate, but bers make their selection 
preserve the same roundness and fullness as at 
Brst. " W. E. DEMPSTER, Waycross, Ga. 

"I take pleasure in certifying to the excellence of the Ludden & 
Bates Piano. I can cheerfully and truthfully recommend it as a first- 
class instrument, the equal of any and the superior of most in the 
qualities necessary to the accompanient of the voice, and I believe it 
to be more than any other suited to withstand the effects of our Florida 
climate. " F. W. DODGE, Jasper, Fla. 

"I like my piano very much. Am sure I couldn't have been bet- 
ter pleased with any other. ' ' MISS D AUTHITT GALLMAN, George- 
town, Miss. 




illustrated catalogue which pictures the nine 
and Player-Pianos from which Club mem- 



"The lovely piano came yesterday (May 3, 1912). Am just de- 
lighted with it; so are my musical friends. The tone is so full and 
sweet, and the case is lovely. " 

MRS. MAY W. FARMER, Blythewood, S. C. 

"I think it a capital idea. I know we would not have had our 
piano it we had waited to have gotten the wh..le amount. 1 find no 
faultiwith the Club plan so far, and as for the Club piano, we are just 
delighted with it. All our friends say they would like to have one just 
like it. It is just a beauty, and we value it more than anything else in 
the house." MRS. S. J. LEWIS, Attapulgus, Ga. 



LUDDEN & BATES 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN 
ADVOCATE PIANO CLUB DEPT 



Atlanta, Ga. 



mond, Va.; Mrs. Locke A. Allen, High 
Point, N. C, and Miss Mary Somers, of 
Lubbock, Texas. The subject of this 
sketch had a wide circle of acquain- 
tances and was a favorite among the 
young people, well liked and respected 
by older ones. He was a bright boy 
in school and always a social, genial 
companion; was full of energy and 
managed his affairs in a business-like 
way. He was the fifth child in the 
family. The burial service was con- 
ducted by the writer, assisted by Dr. 
L. L. Moore, of Taylorsville, in the 
Stony Point Methodist church, of which 
he was a member, in the presence of 
six or seven hundred people. So far 
as was known Frank was a loyal, de- 
voted Christian young man. One of 
the last things he ever did in this 
world was to pay his subscription for 
missions. It was hard and sad to give 
him up. Everybody liked him. After 
the service we deposited his mortal 
remains in Stony Point cemetery, 
southeast corner, to await the trumpet 



call that shall awake the dead. The 
morning before leaving for my new 
work I honored his resting place by 
a last visit with the deepest of grief. 
I turned away from that place. My 
prayer is that God will with His com- 
forting grace and love bless the be- 
reaved and that we all may meet 
sometime, somewhere, to spend eter- 
nity in the golden city whose walls 
are jasper and streets are gold and 
gates are pearl. God bless the father 
and mother. 
Written by his pastor, sincerely, 
D. S. Richardson. 



PARR1SH — James Alexander Par- 
rish, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. 
E. R. Parrish, died Tuesday morning 
of last week at their home on Greg- 
ory Street, and was buried Wednes- 
day morning in the family plot at 
Ho't's chapel. 

This bright, sweet babe of only four 
months leaves a twin brother. Possibly 
no heme has been blessed with two 



more lovely children. May the com- 
forting grace of the blessed Lord who 
said, "Suffer little children to come 
unto me . . . for of such is the 
kingdom of heaven," come upon and 
abide with the bereaved parents. 

W. O. G. 



There is no excuse for sloth. We 
must seek to do our best, in order to 
give our best. Our gifts were not 

•estowed upon us for ourselves alone, 
we are stewards and are bound to 
cultivate and exercise them as we 
have opportunity for the good of 

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Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 8, 1914 




FIRST QUARTER — LESSON II 
JANUARY 11, 1914 



The Mission of the Seventy. Luke 
10:1-24 



Golden Text — It is not ye that speak, 
but the Spirit of your Father that 
speaketh in you. Matt. 10:20. 



Summary of the Lesson 

Jesus used men to the full extent 
of their ability to be serviceable. The 
sending of the seventy was for the 
sake of the Kingdom of God and for 
the sake of the men who were sent. 
Like John the Baptist multiplied sev- 
enty times, they were to prepare the 
way for the coming of Jesus. The 
words in which they were commission- 
ed were full of the sense of the solemn 
urgency of their work, and the sharp 
condemnation of the cities which had 
failed to appreciate their great oppor- 
tunity added emphasis to the words 
•of explicit direction. The seventy did 
their work and returned full of a 
sacred joy because of their success. 
Jesus rejoiced with them and uttered 
a prayer of glad thanksgiving. 

The Commission of the Seventy 
If any one doubts that Jesus was the 
supreme optimist he has only to 
read the words which describe the 
world as a great harvest field, ripe 
and ready for the reapers. The more 
one studies this utterance the more 
he is amazed by its triumphant con- 
fidence in the responsiveness of men 
to the gospel message. Jesus seems 
more troubled about gathering ade- 
quate messengers than He is about 
men's response when the message is 
once given. His directions to the 
group of men He is sending out are 
striking enough. They are to go be- 
lieving that it is perfectly practicable 
for a sheep to attack a wolf. The 
world has been conducted for a long 
time on the basis of depending upon 
wolflike qualities for power. In the 
new days sheeplike qualities are to 
prove triumphant. Men's gentleness 
is to make them victorious as well as 
great. The disciple is not to be a 
vagrant. With dignity he is to re- 
ceive the gift of hospitality and do 
his work of healing and declaring 
the coming kingdom. Ministry to the 
body and ministry to the soul are 
to go together. When a city shall 
refuse to receive the messengers such 
words of powerful warning are to be 
spoken as may well keep ringing in 
men's ears long after the messengers 
have departed. 

A great Annual Conference sat thrill- 
ed by the eloquence of the presiding 
Bishop as he spoke to the class of 
young men whe were about to be re- 
ceived into full membership in the 
body. Soon they were to be sent out 
to represent their Lord in certain 
communities. Theii lives were to be 
given to the work ol the Kingdom. 
The Bishop urged them to be lovers 
of men and the passion for humanity 
was in his voice as he spoke. He 
urged them to be lovers of truth, and 
like a breath from the great Reforma- 
tion came his word as he spoke of 
freedom of thought. He urged them 
to be lovers of God, and the solemn 
sanctions of religion dominated his 
speech as he pleaded for a ministry 
truly devoted to the Lord of life. The 
scene could be multiplied thousands 
of times. Since the Man of Galilee 
began to send men forth in His name 
untold numbers have been commission- 
ed. The strength of the sheep is prov- 
ing itself stronger than the strength 
of the wolf. As apostles of love men 
are winning the world for God. 
The Abuse of Privilege 

As Jesus spoke of the cities which 



would reject Him He thought of the 
cities which had rejected Him. Then 
He thought of the cities which had 
never had an opportunity to reject 
Him. Hot and passionate and terri- 
ble came forth His words of condem- 
nation. He had given Himself to cer- 
tain towns. Day by day His voice had 
been heard in their synagogues and 
their streets. Day by day crowds had 
gathered to witness His deeds of pow- 
er; there had been great excitement; 
there had been no end of talk, but 
His words had not been taken serious- 
ly by those who had looked and lis- 
tened. They treated him like a street 
magician and not like a prophet. They 
had come to Him with a lust for new 
sensations and not with a desire for 
truth. They had not understood their 
privilege and they had failed in their 
day of great opportunity. Old heath- 
en cities, which the Jews despised, 
would have repented long ago had 
they been given such an opportunity. 
Judgment would be an easier matter 
for a heathen city like Tyre than for 
a Jewish town like Capernaum when 
that town rejected the One sent of 
God. To be supreme in privilege was 
to be supreme in sin if that privilege 
was spurned. 

The Jews had not been conspicuous 
for remembering that responsibility 
goes with privilege. They were will- 
ing to accept all the advantages which 
came from being a favored people. Je- 
sus brought them face to face with 
the fact that the chosen people could 
be no more guilty than any other if 
they proved unworthy of God's choice. 

A wealthy young man in one of 
America's largest cities recently spoke 
some simple and touching words about 
the way in which he was feeling the 
responsibility of wealth and trying 
to find out just what it involved in a 
practical way for him. The man who 
lives in Capernaum is sometimes a 
man of wealth. He may be a man of 
powerful and well-disciplined intellect. 
He may have any one of a number of 
gifts. Whatever it is which admits 
him to the city of privilege he needs 
to face the fact that the abuse of 
privilege is one of the darkest trag- 
edies of life. 

The Success of the Seventy 
In one of his brief poems, striking 
for its compression and vigor and dra- 
matic power, Robert Browning tells 
of how a boy came to report to Napol- 
eon a triumph of the French soldiers: 
" 'Well,' cried he, 'Emperor, by God's 
grace, 

We've got you Ratisbon! 

The marshal's in the market place, 

And you'll be there anon 
To see your flag-bird flap his vans 

Where I, to heart's desire 
Perched him!' The chief's eye flash- 
ed; his plans 

Soared up again like fire." 

The picture of the great | soldier 
waiting to hear the report of what 
his fighting men had done at a criti- 
cal point, and the gleam of sudden 
joy in his eye when he heard the 
news of victory, is unforgettable. 

Another commander waited for the 
report of a little company of men, 
whom He had sent out on a prelimin- 
ary expedition. At length they re- 
turned. Their faces were glowing. 
Their eyes were full of glad light. 
They had been successful beyond tneir 
own hopes. The intoxication of 
achievement was throbbing in their 
blood. The thrill of victory was beat- 
ing in their hearts. The Chief's eyes 
! flashed when He heard their story. 
| There was a rapturous moment in 
I which Master and men rejoiced togeth- 
er. Then Jesus, careful always of 
every aspect of an experience, began 
to speak words of noble caution. He 
did not seek to rob them of their joy. 
He did seek to give them a deeper 
basis for their joy. They were to be 
glad, He told them, not because of 
their power in the Kingdom of heaven, 
but because of their citizenship in that 
Kingdom. The great thing was not 
that a man was an officer in the army 




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of the Lord; the great thing was that 
he was a soldier in the army. There 
was to be no place for a wolflike 
gloat, even in the hour of the dis- 
ciples' triumph. 

The Prayer of Jesus 
The little volume of prayers |by 
Robert Louis Stevenson has impressed 
many men because of Xs simplicity, 
sincerity and directness. The note of 
manliness in religion is conserved by 
such prayers as these. 

The New Testament has a collection 
of great prayers. There are prayers 
of Paul, with a mounting vision -and 
a sweep of thought and an intellec- 
tual grasp which fills the reader with 
sudden surprise. To overhear Paul's 
prayers is an education in religion. 

The student of the Gospel treads 
softly as he approaches the Master 
at prayer. Has he a right to over- 
hear the words which Jesus address- 
ed to His Father? Has he a right to 
share in the inner communion of the 
Son of God with the Most High? He 
removes the sandals from his feet 
as he comes to that holy ground where 
his Lord and Master is engaged in 
prayer. As he listens with open mind 
and heart ne learns why Jesus shared 
His prayers with His disciples. The 
gift of God to men would have been 
incomplete without the prayers of 
Christ. The particular ;-rayer whose 
words ring out in the passage we are 
now studying is one of the glad pray- 
ers of Jesus. It was uttered out of a 
full heart; it resounds with phrases 
telling of the greatness of Jesus and 
His power. Yet it is all shot through 
with a wonderful humility and a gen- 
tle trust. It is full of striking para- 
dox. The infinite God and the babe 
into whose ear He whispers His rev- 
elation are "brought together and the 
men of self-conscious wisdom are left 
out. The All Powerful crowns humil- 
ity and the Son of God seeks the 
;childlike of heart. The equipment 
of the disciples for the work of the 
Kingdom lay partly in a receptiveness 
like that of a child. The seventy were 
not complacent Pharisees, but simple- 
minded men who were ready to obey 
Jesus. It is true that the disciples 
sometimes quarreled like children. It 
is also true that they could trust like 
children. As long as they could trust, 
and grow, and obey, they could be 
used in the great matters of the King- 
dom. A child's virtues do count su- 
premely in religion and in life. — N. 
Y. Christian Advocate. 



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gold. — Lord Avebury. 



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January 8, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



N. B. Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as information, and are not 
guaranteed. 

12:25 a. m. No. 32, daily. The South- 
ern s Southeastern Limited. Pull- 
man drawing -rooin, compartment, 
and open section sleeping cars 
Jacksonville, Augusta, and Aiken 
to New York. Day coaches. Dining 
car service. 

12:55 a. m. JMo. 112 daily. Local for 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Winston-Salem to 
Kaleign open at 9:30 p. m. 
1:20 a. m. No. 29, daily. Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and 
ooservation, sleeping cars New 
York, and Richmond to Birming- 
ham, and New York to ColumDus, 
Ga. Daily tourist car Washington 
to San x rancisco via Sunset Route. 
Dining car service. 
2:05 a. m. No. 30, daily. Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room, 
and observation sleeping cars Birm- 
ingham, Columbus, and Asheville 
to New York, and Birmingham to 
Richmond, Va. Tourist car San 
Francisco-Washington. Dining car 
service. 

2:45 a. m. No. 31, daily. The South- 
ern's Southeastern Limited. Pull- 
man drawing-room, open section, 
and compartment sleeping cars New 
York to Jacksonville, Aiken, and 
Augusta, and New York to Ashe- 
ville. Day coaches. Dining car 
service. 

3:45 a. m. 45 daily local for Charlotte, 
connecting for Atlanta and points 
south. 

7:10 a. m. No. g daily local for Rich- 
mond. 

7:15 a. m. 1st No. 37 daily, New York 
and New Orleans Limited, Pullman 
drawing-room, state-room, open 
section and observation sleeping 
cars. New York and New Orleans; 
club car Washington to Montgom- 
ery; Pullman parlor car Greensboro 
to Montgomery. Solid Pullman 
lanta. Pullman observation parlor 
cial. Pullman drawing-room, open 
section sleeping cars New York to 
Asheville, Charlotte, Macon and At- 
car Greensboro to Atlanta. Solid 
Pullman train, with dining car ser- 
vice. 

7:15 a. m. 2nd No. 37 dally Atlanta ape- 
train with dining car service. 

7:30 a. m. No. 108 daily local Greensboro 
to Goldsboro. 

7:35 a. m. No. 11 daily local to Atlanta. 
Pullman drawing-room, sleeping 
cars Norfolk to Asheville, and Rich- 
mond to Charlotte. 

7:40 a. m. No. 154, daily except Sunday. 
Local to Ramseur. 

8:16 a. m. No. 237, dally for Winston- 
Salem and North Wilkesboro. Hand- 
les Pullman sleeping car Raleigh 
to Winston-Salem. 

8:20 a. m. No. 133 daily local for Mt. 
Airy. 

9:30 a. m. No. 44 daily for Washington 

and points north. 
9:40 a. m. No. 144 daily for Raleigh, 
Selma and Goldsboro; handles At- 
lanta-Raleigh sleeping car. 

12:30 p. m. No. 21 daily local to Ashe- 
ville and Waynesville, connecting at 
Asheville with Carolina Special for 
all points west. Coaches and Pull- 
man chair car. 

12:45 p. m. No. 7 daily local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Seneca and 
Columbia. 

12:55 p. m. No. 130 daily local for San- 
ford, Fayetteville and Wilmington. 
1:00 p. m. No. 14 daily local for Rich- 
mond. Sleeping car Danville to 
Richmond. 

1:35 p. m. No. 36, dally U. S. Fast Mall, 
for Washington, New York and 
points north. Pullman sleeping cars 
Birmingham and New Orleans to 
New York, and Asheville to Rich- 
mond. Pullman chair car Greenville 
to Washington. Dining car ser- 
vice. 

2:30 p. m. No. 151 daily except Sunday 
for Madison. 

2:00 p. m. No. 207 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

3:30 p. m. No. 230 daily except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

4:20 p. m. No. 22 dally for Raleigh, Sel- 
ma and Goldsboro. Pullman chair 
car Waynesville to Goldsboro. 

5:00 p. m. No. 131 dally for Mount Airy 
connecting at Rural Hall, dally ex- 
cept Sunday with train for North 
Wilkesboro. 

5:40 p. m. No. 13 dally local for Salis- 
bury; handles Pullman sleeping car 
Richmond to Asheville, which car 
may be occupied until 7 a. m. 

6:10 p. m. No. 35 dally U. S. Fast Mall 
through to Atlanta and New Or- 
leans. Pullman sleeping cars New 
York to New Orleans and Birming- 
ham, and Pullman chair car Wash- 
ington to Greenville. Dining car 
service. 

6:30 p. m. No. 132 daily local for San- 
ford. 

6:36 p. m. No. 235 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:30 p. m. No. 43 dally for Atlanta and 
points south. Pullman sleeping car 
Raleigh to Atlanta. 

10:13 p. m. 1st No. 38 daily Atlanta Spec- 
ial. Pullman drawing-room, open 
section sleeping cars Macon, Atlan- 
ta, Charlotte and Asheville to New 
York. Pullman observation car At- 
lanta to Greensboro. Solid Pullman 
train with dining car service. 

10:20 p. m. No. 233 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

10:31 p. m. No. 12 daily local to Richmond, 
Handles Pullman sleeping cars 
Asheville to Norfolk and Charlotte 
to Richmond. 

11:13 p. m. 2nd No. 38 daily New York 
and New Orleans Limited. Pullman 
drawing-room, state room, open sec- 
tion and observation sleeping cars 
New Orleans to New York; club 
car Montgomery to Washington. 
Solid Pullman train with dining 
car aervice. 



Our Little Folks 



JANUARY 

I'm little January. 

Perhaps you do not know 
How far I've come to see you 

Across the fields of snow. 

I've lots of little sisters, 

A little brother, too; 
And every one is coming 

To make a call on you. 

But I got ready quickly 

And came right straight off here 
To be the first to meet you 

This happy, bright New Year. 

— Jewels. 



THE KIDDIE'S KALENDAR 

Jingling sleigh bells in the snow, 
Ann and Jack with cheeks aglow. 
No w the days are jolly — very! 
Up and down the great white hill, 
Ah, to coast and coast until 
.Round the corner, spinning, merry, 
You bump into January! 

— Garnet Noel Wiley. 



A THOUGHTFUL TRAVELER 

Totsie Tate's small hands clutched 
cautiously the side of the big plush 
seat, which she occupied alone, as the 
train started off. Her new shiny boots 
stood straight out before, as her legs 
were too short to touch the floor. Her 
baggage consisted of a small purse, 
worn inside her stocking, and a yel- 
low paper sack, which she had placed 
on the seat beside her. The tiny pas- 
senger gave a sigh ol relief as the 
great locomotive moved slowly out of 
the station shed. At last the railway 
journey, so long and eagerly antici- 
pated, was begun, and, under the care 
of the conductor, she was to travel 
from Oareysboro to Gladwood, forty 
miles away, where Grandma and aun- 
ties Juliana and Hilda lived. Her 
small trunk had been packed last night 
and sent away to the station, and she 
had a check for that in her purse, 
together with her ticket. She looked 
curiously out the window. It was 
funny how all the fields and houses 
and fences seemed to be running back 
the other way; and, my, how fast 
the train swept along! The whistle 
blew presently, and then there was 
a stop at an ugly little station, and 
a woman carrying a baby and sev- 
eral packages entered the coach. She 
stood in the aisle for a moment, look- 
ing anxiously about. Totsie moved 
closer to the window and called out 
pleasantly: "Sit by me, if you please. 
There's plenty of room." The woman 
accepted the offer with great pleasure, 
and just then the train started off. "Put 
the large box under my feet here, 
and the smaller packages between us,'' 
Totsie suggested, assisting the woman 
with her baggage. 

The baby, who was nodding, fell 
asleep almost as soon as the train 
resumed its motion. A little girl across 
the aisle opened a dainty lunch bas- 
ket and took out some pretty frosted 
cakes. Immediately Totsie was re- 
minded of her yellow sack, and was 
hungry for doughnuts. But alas! 
There were no doughnuts m the sack. 
In their stead there were spools of 
floss. "Dear me! What a mistake 
I've made! Both sacks were there 
on the table at home; and I was so 
hurried I picked up mother's floss, 
which she brought from lihe store with 
the doughnuts; and, O, I'm so sorry, 
for I can' t eat floss, and I'm so hun- 
gry; and mother will be sorry, for 
she needs the floss," Totsie was think- 
ing regretfully, when the baby awak- 
ened and began to cry. The infant 
continued to cry, and the mother look- 
ed very tired and ill. "Let me nold 
the baby, please. I hold our baby 
at home every day, and I think I can 
quiet her," Totsie suggested, extend- 
ing her hands entreatinrly to the ba- 



by, who came at once, and was pres- 
ently so interested in the small gold 
chain and locket, a birthday gift which 
the little girl wore, that she was soon 
smiling through her tears, and after 
a while dozed off in her new friend's 
arms. 

"You're a very nice little girl,'' the 
mother observed gratefully. "You of- 
fered me part of your seat, and you've 
gotten my baby back to sleep. I've a 
sack of doughnuts here, which I made 
myself. Most little girls who come 
to see me like my doughnuts very 
much. See if you like them." 

Totsie liked the doughnuts better 
than any she had ever tasted before. 
They were far better than the ones 
oought at Mr. Jackson's bakery. She 
liked them so much, in fact, that by 
the time the conductor called out Glad- 
wood Station she had eaten the last 
one in the sack. "Good-by, baby; 
good-by, lady," she said as sne climb- 
ed down from the seat. "I thank you 
so much for the doughnuts." 

"And 1 thank you so much for your 
kindness. You're a very thoughtful 
traveler, and one doesn't always find 
that sort," the lady replied. And the 
oaby awaking, held out her chubby 
nands for the little girl hurrying down 
the aisle. — Selected. 



ELEANOR'S PIG 

One day when Nora, the cook, went 
down town she bought Eleanor a china 
pig with a slit in the back for pen- 
nies. 

"Sure," said Nora, "some little gir- 
ruls do be pigs theirselves and eat 
up their pennies. But Eleanor isn't 
that kind; she'll let a rale pig take 
care of hers." 

"But how do little girls eat pen- 
nies?" questioned Eleanor. 

"Why, by spending them for chape 
oandy and gum and such loike." 

"And what'll the pig do with the 
pennies, Nora?" 

"Sure, the pig'll be takin' care of 
them until there's a lot, an' then you 
^an do whatefer you loike with them." 

"O, I know!" Eleanor cried, clapping 
ner hands. "I could get a pair of 
dhoes for that little baby we saw bare- 
footed that cold day when mother and 
i were out walking.'' 

It was remarkable the way that pig 
was fed through his back. When 
Eleanor s mother was sure they had 
enough, they broke the pig and found 
a lot of pennies, nickels, and two shiny 
dimes. Then they got the mother of 
die baby to go down to the store with 
aiem and take the baby along. Eleanor 
paid for the cunning little brown shoes 
j.nd a pretty white bonnet, so the little 
one might go to the cradle roll party 
the next day in the big church par- 
lors. 

"I knew,' said Nora, "that little 
Eleanor would loike to have a pig, 
and I was not mistaken. Why she's 
getting as much pleasure as she's giv- 
ing. Bless her sunny curls!" — Ex- 
change. 



TWO WAKEFUL ONES 

Baby, the moon has climbed high in 
the skies; 

Close now your dear little blinky blue 
eyes. 

Everything's sleeping, my sweet (can't 

you see?), 
Save you and the owl out there in the 

tree. 

He cries to the darkness, "Tu whit, 

tu whoo.'' 
Who is it that answers him, "Boo hoo, 

boo hoo"? 
All else is sleeping. O baby dear, 

hark. 

Leave wails to the owl up there in 
the dark. — Louise Willard. 



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Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 8, 1914 



Quarterly Meetings 



» 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT— C. A. Wood, 
Presiding Elder, Weaverville, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Henderson Ct., Moores Grove 27-28 

Henders»nville 28 

Bethel, Ashevllle, night 28 

January 

Hot Springs, Hot Springs 3 

Marshall 4 

Haywood St., Asheville, night 4 

Mills River, Horseshoe iu-il 

Flat Rock, Flat Rock 11 

North Asheville, night 11 

Brevard Ct., Rosman 17 

Brevard 18 

Biltmore, night IS 

Sulphur Springs, Pleasant Hill 24-25 

West Asheville 25 

Black Mountain 30 

Swannanoa Ct., Swannanoa 31 

February 

Central, Asheville 1 

Weaverville 1 

Fairview Ct., Tweeds 7-8 

Tryon and Saluda, Try on 8 

Weaverville Ct.. Salem 14-15 

Mars Hill, Laurel 15 

Leicester, Leicester 21-22 

Walnut, Jewell Hill 28 

March 

Spring Creek, Balm Grove 1 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— Plato T. Dur- 
ham, Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Charlotte— Tryon St 14 

Brevard St., night 14 

Trinity 21 

Belmont, night 21 

Chadwick 28 

Dil worth, night 28 

January 

Derita, Trinity 3-4 

Spencer, Memorial, night 4 

Hickory Grove ..10-11 

Calvary, night 11 

Pineville, Harrison 17-18 

Duncan Memorial and Huntesville, 

Duncan Memorial, night 18 

Weddington, Hebron 24 

Waxhaw, Waxhaw ; 25-26 

Prospect, Trinity 31 

February 

Monroe, Central 1 

North Monroe 1 

Ansonville, Ansonville 7-8 

Lilesville, Lilesville 8-9 

Morven, Sandy P 14-15 

Wadesboro, night 16 

Unionville, Grace 21-22 

Polkton, Peachland, night 22-23 

March 

Matthews, Matthews 1-2 

Marshville, Gilboa 7-8 

Mt. Zion, Mt. Zion 14-15 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT— G. T. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Wentworth Ct., Salem 20-21 

Reidsville, p. m 21-22 

Greensboro Ct., Holt's 27-28 

Gibsonville Ct., Mt. Pleasant 28-29 

! | January 

Randolph Ct., Fairview 3-4 

East and West H. Point 4 

W. Greensboro Ct., Muir's 10-11 

West Market Street 11 

Pleasant Garden Ct., PI. Gr 17-18 

Walnut St. and Car., Car 18 

Uwharrie Ct, Concord 24-25 

Denton Ct., Denton 25-L'tl 

February 

Deep River Ct., West Bend 31-1 

Asheboro, a. m 1 

Rai dleman and N. St. Ptul's 1-2 

Coleridge Ct., Concord 7-8 

Ramseur and F'ville, Ramseur 8-9 

Ruffln Ct., Ruffln 14-15 

District stewards will meet in West 
Market St. church, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 
at 10 a. m. 



MOUNT AIRY DISTRICT— R. M. Hoyle, 
Presiding Elder, Mount Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Summerfleld Ct., Center 27-28 

January 

Mount Airy Ct., Salem 3-4 

Mount Airy Station 4-5 

Ararat, Hunter's Chapel 10-11 

Stokesdale Ct., Stokesdale 17-18 

Walnut Ceve Ct., Pine Hall 24 

Madison and Steneville, Madison ..25-26 

Rural Hall Ct., Rural Hall 31 

February 

Pilot Mountain Ct., Pilot Mountain ..1-2 

Jonesville Ct., Jenesville 7-3 

Elkin Station 8-9 

Danbury Ct., Davis' Chapel 14-15 

Spray and Draper, Spray 21-22 

Leaksville Statien 23-24 

Dobson Ct., Slloam 28 

March 

Yadkinville, East Bend 1-2 

The district stewards will pleas* meet 
me at Walnut Cove at 12 o'cleck, Wed- 
nesday, Dec. 81. Let all attend, please. 



M ORG ANTON DISTRICT— J. E. GAY, 
Presiding Elder, Marlon, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Thermal City, Thermal City 20-21 

McDowell, Glenwood ST. 27-28 

January 

Marion Ct., Carson's Chapel 2 

Table Rock, Oak Hill 3-4 

Morgan ton Station , 4-5 

Rutherford. Rutherfordton 10-11 

Green River. Lebanon 10 

Forest City, Pleasant Grove 17-18 

Broad River, Wesley's hapel , 24-25 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Henrietta, 26-26 

Cliff side, Cllffside 27 

Morganton Ct., Mt., 

Pleasant 31, Feb. 1 

February 

Connelly Springs, Connelly Springs, 7-8 

Vllcaville, Shoal Creek 13 

Bald Creek, Elk Shoal 14-15 

LSurnesville, Burnesville 16-16 

Spruce Pine and Bakensville, Spruce 

Pine 21-22 

The districts stewards will meet in the 
Methodist church at Marion, Friday, Dec. 
19, at 2 p. m. 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— M. 
H. Vestal, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Laurel Springs, Chestnut Hill 20-21 

Wllkesboro Station .28-29 

January 

JefCersen, Creston 2 

Creston, Creston 3-4 

Watauga, Hensen's Chapel 7 

Boone, Fairview 10-11 

Wilkes, Beulah 17-18 

North Wllkesboro Station 26-26 

February 

Elkville Mission, Stanton 1 

Elk Park, Elk Park 8-9 

Avery, Plnola 14-15 

District stewards' meeting in North 
Wllkesboro at 11 a. m., Dec. 30. 



SALISBURY DISTRICT — W, R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Salisbury, First Church, 11 a. m 14 

East Spencer and North Main St., 

North Main Street night 14 

Salisbury Circuit, Shlloh 20-21 

Salisbury, Holmes Memorial, night ...21 

Salem Circuit, Salem 27-28 

Albemarle, First Street, night 28 

Mount Pleasant Ct., Mt. Pleasant ...3-4 

January 

West Concord, Kerr St., night 3-4 

Cottonville and Oakboro, 

Cedar Grove 10-11 

Norwood 11-12 

New London Ct., New London 17-18 

Gold Hill Ct, Gold Hill 18-19 

Woodleal Ct, Cleveland 24-25 

China Grove Station, night 25-26 

Concord Ct, Olivet 31 

February 

Concord Ct, Olivet 1 

Concord, Forest Hill, night 1 

Albemarle Circuit, Bethesda 7-8 

Albemarle, Central, night 8 

Kannapolis Station 14-16 

Landis Circuit, Landis 14-15 

Bethel and Loves Chapel, Bethel ..21-22 

Concord, Epworth, night 22 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m 28, Mar. 1 

Concord, Westford, night 28, Mar. 1 

The district stewards will please meet 
in First Church, Salisbury, Dec. 16, 1913, 
12 o'clock noon, sharp. 

Let every charge be represented. 



SHELBY DISTRICT— J. R. Scroggs, 
Presiding Elder, Shelby, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Gastonia, Main St., 14 

Gastonia, West End .....14 

Shelby Ct, Patterson 21 

Shelby, Central 21 

Bessemer City, Bessemer 28 

Kings Mountain, Kings Mountain 28 

January 

Stanley Creek, Stanley 3 

Mt. Holly, South Point 4-5 

Belwood, Kadesh 10-11 

Lowesville, Hills Chapel 17-18 

Moores, Mtn. Island, p. m 18 

Polkville, Clover Hill 24-25 

South Fork, Plateau 31 

February 

Llncolnton Station 1 

Lincolnton Ct, Pisgah 7-8 

Lowell, Lowell 14 

McAdenville McAdenville, night 14 

Crouse, Antioch 21 

Cherryville, Mary's Chapel 28 

District Stewards will meet at Shelby 
on Wednesday, Dec. 31, 1913, at 2 o'clock 
p. m. 

STATESVILLE DISTRIST— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Lenoir Circuit, Pleasant Grove, 
11 a. m 20-21 

South Lenoir and Valmead, Whitnel, 
night I. 21-22 

Hlckery Ct, Marvin, 11 a. m 27-28 

Newten Station, Newton, night 21-29 

January 

Granite Falls and Hudson, Granite 

Falls, 11 a. m 4-5 

Hickory, First Church, night 4-6 

Reck Springs Ct., Denver, 11 a. m. ( 10-11 
Maiden Ct, Maiden, night 11-12 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

HOLT'S CHAPEL 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



AMOUNT 



tNjame 



Date. 



191— 



Dolla 



Cents 



M1SSI0HS AND CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 



Name. 
Date .. 



Doll 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $ I 40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities. 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



Statesvllle Ct, Trinity, 11 a. m 17-18 

Broad St., Broad St., night 18-19 

Iredell Ct, Olin, 11 a. m 24-25 

Race St., Race St., night 25-26 

Alexander Ct, Hiddenite, 

11 a. m 31, Feb. 1 

February 

Stony Point Ct, Stony Pt, night 1-2 

Catawba Ct, Catawba, 11 a. m. ..7-8 
Cool Springs Ct, New Salem, 

11 a. m 14-15 

Troutman Ct., Vanderburg, 11 a. m., 21-22 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresvllle, night 22-23 
Mooresville Ct, Fairview, 

11 a. m 28, Mar. 1 

March 

Davidson Sta., Davidson, night 1-2 

Marion Station 7-8 

N. Lenoir Ct, Mt. Zion, 11 a. m. ..7-8 

Lenoir Sta., Lenoir, night 8-9 

The district stewards, pastors and lay 
leaders will meet in Broad St. church at 
Statesvllle on Dec. 17, at 12 o'clock, noon. 
A full attendance of the above persons 
is earnestly desired. 



WAYN ESV1LLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
ded, Presiding Elder, R. 2, Ashevllle, 
N. C. 

December 

Bethel Ct, Bethel 20-21 

Canton Ct, Harmony Grove 27 

Haywood, Crabtree 28-29 

January 

Webster Ct, Webster 3-4 

Sylva Station 4-5 

Clyde Ct, Long's Chapel 8-9 

Jonathan Ct, Dellwood 10-11 

Fines Creek Ct, Fines Creek 12-13 

Bryson and Whittler, Whittler 17-18 

Judson Ct, Judson 18-19 

Glen villa Ct, GlenvlUe 23-24 



Highlands Ct, Highlands 25-26 

Franklin Ct, Salem 28-29 

Macon Ct, Union 30-31 

February 

Franklin Station 1-2 

Hayesville Ct, Bethel 4-5 

Ranger Ct., Ranger 7 

Murphy Station 8-9 

Robbinsvllle, Robblnsville 11-12 

Murphy Ct, Tomotla 14 

Andrews Station 15-16 

Crestmont 21-22 

Waynesville Station 24 

Canton Station 25 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, Pre- 
siding Elder, Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Walkertown, 11 a. m 21 

Burkhead, 7:30 p. m 21 

Thomasvllle Ct, Fair Grove 27-28 

Thomasville, Main Street 28-29 

Januar 

Davidson, Good Hope 3-4 

Salem Station 4-5 

Jackson Hill, Jackson Hill 10-11 

Davie Circuit Callahan 17-18 

Mocksvllle 18-19 

Lin wood Circuit, Linwood .....24-25 

Lexington 25-26 

Forsyth Ct, Bethel 31, Feb. 1.. 

February 

Forsyth Ct, Bethel 1 

Cooleemee, night 1-2 

Lewlsvllle, Sharon 7-8 

Southsld.e night 8-9 

Centenary, 11 a. m 14 

West End, 7:30 p. m 14 

Farmington, Farmlngton 21-22 

Advance, Advance 22-23 



January 8, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 

Entered the 1 oat Office at Greensboro, N. C. , as 
mall matter o the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year H ** 

Six Months N 

T» all preachers of the Gospel at I 
per year. 
Hake all remittances to CH Rl •• > i 

ADVOCATE, Greensboro. N C 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION INC 

D. B. Coltrane, President . Con. 
Rev. J. R. Scroggs. Vlce-Pres., Charl." 

N. L. Eure. Secretary Greens!.. 

W. Q. Bradshaw High Pol' 

T. C. Hoyle Greensboro 



LIFE 

Let me but live my life from year to 
year, 

Not hurrying to, nor turning from, 
the goal; 

With forward face and unreluctant 
soul; 

Not mourning for the things that dis- 
appear 

In the dim past, nor holding back in 
fear 

From what the future veils; but 

with a whole 
And happy heart, that pays its toll 
To Youth and Age, and travels on with 
cheer. 

So let the way wind up the hill or 
down, 

O'er rough or smooth, the journey 

will oe joy; 
Still seeking what I sought when but 

a boy, 

New friendship, high adventure, and 
a crown, 

My heart will keep the courage of the 
quest. 

And hope the road's last turn will be 
the best. — Henry Van Dyke. 



IN THE HEART OF THINGS 

The blackberries were almost all 
over; there was nothing left but a 
last gleaning. Autumn rains and 
storms will soon be ihere and there 
will be no other chance. 

So we started on our task. "I'll go 
ahead a little,'' my companion gleaner 
said, "I'll get what I can; and when 
you reach my work, you can pass me 
and begin again. Let me see what 
you've got already." 

And so we encouraged one another. 
I stooped all the time. The objects of 
my search were too low down; some 
clinging to the earth, which soiled 
them; I had to lift them up in groups, 
and raise them, so that the light might 
shine on them before I could venture 
on the gathering. 

Gently as I touched them, some 
would elude my grasp, and drop back 
to the earth. As I hunted the lost 
my eye fell on others in the same posi- 
tion, and those I was able to secure 
and save! To do this I had to keep 
kneeling. It was the only posture in 
which I could work. Otherwise the 
ones very near to me ran the chance 
of being overlooked, and lost forever 
to my vision. 

It was only by getting down to the 
heart of things that I could do any 
good work. And even then at times 
how I was deceived! I'd turn back 
the hiding leaves, to make room for 
my hand, when I fancied I saw a 
bright berry ready for my finger-clasp; 
when lo, it was but a dark red shrivel- 
ed leaf! 

Notwithstanding my little disap- 
pointments we did better on this shady 
side of the bushes than on the other. 
There the sun of fortune had been 
too much for them; they were wither- 
ed and bare, with fruit but few and 
far between. 

The sympathy of my co-worker was 
always my inspiration. We were glean- 



Greensboro College for Women 

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CONFERENCES OF NORTH CAROLINA 

FOUR YEARS COURSE LEADING TO A. B. DEGREE 

New Departments Inaugurated Beginning 
of Fall Term, Sept. 10, 1913 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT.— Separate corps of teachers. Students who have success- 
fully completed the eighth grade may enter this department. Individual attention given to 
students. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.— Pedagogy taught by Miss Jennie T. Clarke, graduate of 
Peabody College for teachers. Opportunity for observation afforded by the city schools. 
HOME ECONOMICS. — Miss Minnie W. Hopper, teacher in this department, is a graduate in 
Domestic Science and Arts in South Mississippi College and comes to us highly recommended. 



In addition to the above new departments we desire to call special attention to our 
SUPERIOR SCHOOL OF MUSIC —The former high standard will be maintained. This de- 
partment has been strengthened by a class in Theory of Music preparatory to harmony. The 
Director of Music, who has made a specialty of voice training, will teach a number of students. 
BUSINESS DEPARTMENT —Miss Mattie Caldwell will continue to have special charge of 
the Business Department of the college. Some of the most important business positions in the 
city are held by young women trained in the Business School of Greensboro College for Women. 
The latest, up-to-date text-books are being used in our business course. 

Spring term begins Jan. 14, 1914. 

For further particulars regarding the college, address 

Rev. S. B. Turrentine, A. M., D. D., President 

Greensboro, N. C. 



ing in the same poor harvest field, 
striving to gather in all we could. 

" It's just the experience of the 
'slum workers,' " I said. "They must 
descend to the level of the poor and 
wretched and make allowances for the 
environment which binds them to the 
earth — the dark shades of circum- 
stances. And while the workers are 
trying with love and gentleness to 
raise them to a higher plane, they 
drop sometimes suddenly out and 
away down to still lower depths.'' 

"Yes," my companion answered, "but 
many are brought in by a gentle per- 
suasive touch, and the work is more 
hopeful and progressive than among 
the rich and aspiring. They are apt 
to bask in their self-deluded happiness 
in the glare of the world's false glit- 
ter!" 

"Yes, I know, and it's on bis knees 
that the poor-worker gains his help 
and strength." 

Are these not beautiful lines of Chris- 
tina Rossetti's? 

"Use me, my God, in thy great harvest 
field, 

Which stretches far and wide like 
a wide sea; 
The gatherers are so few, I fear the 
precious yield 
Will suffer loss. O find a place for 
me!" 

— Louisa A'hmuty Nash. 



SIGN YOUR NAME HERE 
If you suffer with any chronic dis 
ease that does not seem to be benefit- 
ed by drugs, such as dyspepsia, indi- 
gestion, rheumatism, gall stones, liver 
or kidney diseases, or any other chron- 
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are cordially invited to accept the lib- 
eral offer made below. It is a grave 
mistake to assume that your case is 
incurable simply because remedies pre- 
pared by human skill have not seem- 
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nature, accept this offer and you will 
never have cause to regret it. 

I believe this is the most wonderful 
Mineral Spring that has ever been dis- 
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cured or benefited nearly everyone who 
has accepted my offer. Match your 
faith against my pocketbook and if 



this Spring does not relieve your case 
I will make no charge for the water. 
Clip this notice.sign your name, en- 
close the amount and let this won- 
derful water begin its healing work 
in you as it has in thousands of others. 
Shivar Spring 

Box 5A, Shelton, S. C. 
Gentlemen: 

I accept your guarantee offer and 
enclose herewith two dollars for ten 
gallons of Shivar Mineral Water. I 
agree to give it a fair trial, in accor- 
dance with instructions contained in 
booklet you will send, and if the re- 
sults are not satisfactory to me you 
agree to refund the price in full upon 
the receipt of the two empty demi- 
johns which I agree to return prompt- 
ly. 

Name 

Address 

Shipping Point 

(Please write distinctly.) 

Note: — The Advertising Manager of 
the N. C. Christian Advocate is per- 
sonally acquainted with Mr. Shivar. 
You run no risk whatever in accept- 
ing his offer. I have personally wit- 
nessed the remarkable curative power 
of this Water in a very serious case. 

FOR SALE 
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Sun Typewriter, second hand, $20.00. 
L. P. Bogle, Ruffin, N. C. 

A BOOK OF THRIFTY TREES AND 
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If you are interested in obtaining 
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for this company's catalog. Mr. How- 
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all agents' and middlemen's profits. 
There are 46 beautiful roses in this 
catalog, 36 lovely flowering shrubs, 
30 different evergreens, 13 shade trees 
and a complete assortment of quality 
fruit trees of every variety. Write 
them. 



160 pages, round or shap- 
ed nolBs: muslin bind- 
ing: 1914 scng book. 43 
old tunes of the church, 
127 pages 1914 music. Price 30c per copy, $3.00 
per dozen, postpaid. Send 12 cents and 12 
names and addresses made up of singing teach- 
ers, choir leaders, Sunday School superinten- 
dents and singers, and get one sample copy 
postpaid. Address 

The Teachers Music Pub. Co., 
Lenoir, N. C. 




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Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 8, 1914 



li: 



PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 1914= 



The Board of Publication looks forward to the ensuing 
Conference year with great hope. Under the plan adopted 
by our recent Conference it is expected that a twenty per 
cent, increase is to be regarded as the minimum. We ought 
to go far beyond this mark. With many thousand families 
represented in the membership of our church, still without 
the weekly visits of our paper, there is a great field open 
to us for development, and we trust the year before us will 
witness such a spirit of co-operation as we have never had 
before. 

Last year was, in every way, the most successful year in 
the history of our paper in the matter of co-operative effort 
to give it wide circulation. While we added an unusual 
number of new subscribers, however, we failed to look as 
carefully after renewals as we should. The result was that 
our net increase did not compare favorably with the large 
number of new subscribers added to the list. We must this 
year not only secure all the new subscribers allotted, but 
we must see that the old list is renewed. According to the 
plan adopted, in case of failure to renew any subscriber on 
the list, we must see to it that a new name is found to take 
the place of the one discontinuing. So the allotment to 
each charge this year is the number apportioned to the 
charge by the District Stewards plus the number failing to 
renew. To illustrate: Suppose the Greensboro Circuit has 
fifteen new subscribers allotted, and the list shows forty al- 
ready taking the paper. In the effort to renew the list Brother 
Townsend finds five who decline to renew. It will then 
require that he and his people secure the renewals and five 
new subscribers to take the place of the five who discontinue, 
plus the fifteen allotted to the charge. This is the plan that 
our Committee on Books and Periodicals adopted with the 
view of making provision for the more diligent effort to hold 
the list we already have, and to make sure of a net in- 
crease of not less than twenty per cent. 

Premiums and Prizes 

With the small margin on which we are compelled to do 
business, it is impossible to pay commissions of any conse- 
quence. It is quite easy and natural for those outside to 
make figures and show that we are mistaken about this. But 
a man who has, for a dozen years in succession, studied the 
question on the inside must be in a position to speak with a 
little more certainty than those who have only a theoretic 
knowledge of the subject. Without hesitation the Manager 
of this business declares that no considerable amount can be 
used in the form of compensation to those who assist in keep- 
ing up and extending the circulation. This would not be 
true if we were publishing a paper that could appeal to the 
whole country and to all classes. Such papers can afford 
to purchase their subscription list, and absolutely eschew the 
matter of income from subscription. But this cannot be 
so with a church paper confined to the narrow limits of 
one patronizing Conference. 

However, we have decided to set apart a small amount 
for compensation of those who look after the collections and 
secure the new subscribers, and are now arranging a 

Series of Premiums and Prizes 

which will make it possible for every one who helps to hold our 
lists and to secure a larger circulation to be rewarded for 
their service. So while we are not quite ready to make 
full announcement, those who begin work at once may rest 
assured that their work will count and that they will receive 
their reward. Those who begin at once will have the ad- 
vantage of reaching the goal all the sooner. 

Following is an outline of our premiums and prizes to 
which there may be some additions later, and of which we hope 
in a week or two to show cuts fully illustrating each one. 
Our friends may rest assured that all the goods offered are 
genuine first class articles, and every one will appeal especially 
to a preacher's wife. While we prefer that the pastors and 
their wives take up this work and secure the premiums, yet, in 
case they do not care to they may turn it over to any members 
of the congregation who are willing to undertake it. 



List of Premiums and Prizes 

No. 1. One 26-piece Wm. Rogers Triple Plate 12 oz. Silver 
Set, consisting of one Oak or Mahogany Chest, Six Knives, 
Six Forks, Six Tablespoons, Six Teaspoons, One Sugar Bowl 
and One Butter Knife. The above will be given to the one 
who secures fifty new subscribers. 

No. 2. To the one who will secure thirty-five new sub- 
scriptions, we will give the same assortment of ware only 
without the chest. 

No. 3. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Knives and Forks 
and Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twenty-five 
new subscribers. 

No. 4. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons and one 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in fifteen new sub- 
scriptions. 

No. 5. One Set Rogers Teaspoons, one Sugar Shell, and 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twelve to fifteen 
new subscriptions. 

No. 6. To the ones who will secure ten subscriptions, we 
will give their choice of the following premiums: 

A. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons, one Set 
Rogers Nickle Silver Knives and Forks in a nice box. 

B. One Set Stag Handle Carver, consisting of Carving 
Knife, Fork and Steel. 

C. One Set Aluminum Ware, consisting of one Aluminum 
6-quart Pudding-Pan, one 5-quart Aluminum Milk Pan, one 
Aluminum Dipper, and one Aluminum Cake-Pan. 

# # # # 

In addition to the above we offer the following 
Grand Prizes 

1. To the one sending in the largest number of new sub 
scribers, provided the number shall not be less than 50, we 
offer, in addition to the premium, one No. 2690 Forbes Quadru- 
ple Plate Tea Set, consisting of one 2% pt. Tea Pot, one Sugar 
Bowl, one Cream Pitcher, one Spoon Holder handsomely en- 
graved, and one Butter Dish. 

2. To the one securing the second largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 40, we offer : One 
Nickle-Plated Coffee Percolator Machine, that does away 
with the tannic acid in coffee, and furnishes the pure juice 
of the coffee, especially adapted to the use of old persons 
who are deprived of the use of the beverage on account of its 
injurious effect. With this machine, you can make the best 
drip coffee in five minutes, without injurious qualities. 

3. To the one securing the third largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 30, we offer: 
One Satin-Finished Tilting Triple Plate Water Pitcher, in 
tilting frame. 

4. To the one securing the fourth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 25, we offer : One 
Housekeeper's Casserole, with nickel outside cover — a beauti- 
ful article, and suitable for anyone's table. 

5. To the one securing the fifth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 20, we offer : One 
Kitchen Set, consisting of one Meat Broiler, Ice Pick, Meat 
Fork, Basting Spoon, Butcher Knife, Bread Knife, Cleaver, 
Paring Knife, Can Opener, Bread Toaster, and one ten-hook 
rack to hold above — eleven pieces in all. 

6. To the one securing the sixth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 15, we offer : One 
Ladies' or Gents' Pearl Handle Good Metal Pocket Knife. 

In each case it is understood that the renewals are to 
be collected and in case of the failure of any old subscriber to 
renew, a new subscriber is to be found to take the place of 
the one discontinuing. In no case can a premium or prize be 
awarded where the renewals are neglected. 

Cash must accompany each name sent in, except where 
the pastor is willing to become absolutely responsible. 

Let the work begin at once so that all may have the benefit of 
the paper for the Conference year. 

Address all correspondence regarding the above to 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



M Mna 

Official Oigan of \k Western north larolinaeon^^ : 
llMboaist episcopal £l)urcl), $out^ V 



Thursday, January 15, 1914 




Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 15, 1914 



» »+ 

Note and Comment 

♦ » 

Passes the Two Million Mark 

With a net gain for the year, of 46,231 mem- 
bers, including local preachers, the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, passes the high water 
mark of two million. We have reached the goal 
upon which our eyes have been fixed for several 
years. The gain of the past year is nothing to 
boast of, yet the progress is enough to encour- 
age those who labor for the upbuilding of their 
beloved church and for the saving of souls. 

The total gain of the Sunday schools is 103,- 
685. This increase is the largest of any year 
in the history of the church. The present mem- 
bership of the Sunday schools numbers 1,614,- 
907, which is about eighty per cent, of the 
church membership. 

# # # # 
Capital Dividing with Labor 

The Ford Motor Company proposes to dis- 
tribute annually $10,000,000 to the men who 
work for this company. About one half of the 
yearly profits will, by the new plan, go into 
the hands of the laborers in addition to the 
regular wage. As a result no workman under 
twenty-two years of age will receive less than 
five dollars a day, which will be the gross earn- 
ings of the floor-sweepers. Poor people often 
ride in Ford cars, but there is no reason why 
-the men who build them should be poor. 

*'"'"•" '• # 1, 
Wisconsin's New Marriage Law 

With the beginning of the new year the state 
of Wisconsin put into effect a law which de- 
crees that "marriage licenses shall be issued 
only to those who present certificates from rep- 
utable physicians that they are sound in all 
respects ; it requires that these certificates shall 
t . based on the most searching laboratory tests ; 
and it fixes the doctor's fee at three dollars." 

The State Medical Society criticises the law 
by pointing out that the medical tests would 
involve six or seven experiments costing from 
ten to fifteen dollars each, which the law would 
have them make for the trivial sum of three dol- 
lars. Evidently, if the doctors get their price 
for doing the work that the new law requires, 
getting married in Wisconsin will be so ex- 
pensive that a good bank account will be a 
necessary requisite before one attempts to em- 
bark upon the perilous voyage. 

4fc 44* 

Senator Overman's Pension Bill 

"To refund to the South for pensions for 
the Confederate soldiers the $65,000,000 unlaw- 
fully collected for a tax on cotton during the 
Civil War, ' ' was the bill introduced by Senator 
Overman into the Senate upon the reassembling 
of Congress. The fate of the bill will be watch- 
ed with interest. 

China's Parliament Proves a Failure 

"It has enacted no important law in the 
seven months of its existence, and will not do 
so, if it be permitted to continue a hundred 
years," is the emphatic declaration of a state- 
ment signed by the Vice-president and all the 
civil and military governors of China, concern- 
ing the first legislative body of the new repub- 
lic. We are told, also, that since its opening 
session the Parliament, at no time, has had a 
quorum present. These are among the reasons 
that President Yuan Shih-kai gives for issuing 
a mandate that ends the Chinese Parliament. 

It is said the government will be carried on 
by the President, Vice-president, and an ad- 
ministrative council composed of cabinet officers 
and others appointed by the President and the 
piovisional Governors. Little protest on the 
part of the people has been offered to this rad- 
ical move by the high officials of China. Evi- 
dently the transition from an absolute mon- 
archy to a republic, in which the people shall 



have an kit^lligent interest, and the capacity to 
rule, will not be accomplished by China at once. 

je * * * # 

North Carolina Led the Entire South 

The increase in cotton mill spindles last year 
for North Carolina amounted to 445,300, one 
half as many as were added to the mills in. 
all the rest of the Southern States during the 
year. These figures indicate that the greatest 
activity by far in the manufacture of cotton 
is going on right here in North Carlina ; and, to 
be specific, in the Piedmont section of the State. 
»"#•## 

President Wilson — the Master Workman 

Mr. Bryan, a little while ago, in calling at- 
tention to the character of our President, said: 
"President Wilson combines the two necessary 
qualities for leadership. He follows his con- 
science and is in sympathy with the masses." 
With these essential qualities there exists, may 
we add, an unusual amount of practical com- 
mon sense that enables hkn to employ wisely his 
vast store of knowledge in dealing with the 
tariff, the currency and the trusts. 

The tariff law, which has been accepted with 
litttle economic disturbance, is essentially of 
the President's formation. The new currency 
law, regarded by many as a marvel of con- 
structive statesmanship, bears the imprint of 
his personal influence. In the proposed trust 
legislation, it has been given out that the Pres- 
ident's wishes will be followed in the fixing of 
penalties upon individuals, as well as upon 
corporations, for violation of the law, which is 
an essential feature of the proposed statute. 
# * * # 

The Department of Justice and the New Haven 
Road 

To prevent dissolution under the Sherman 
Law, the New York, New Haven and Hartford 
Railroad" has agreed to the demand of the De- 
partment tif Justice and will dispose of its hold- 
ings in the Boston and Maine Railroad, cancel 
its agreement controlling the Boston and Al- 
bany, give up its trolley lines and several of 
its steamship lines. This is regarded as not 
only a victory for the Department of Justice, 
but also indicates that many anti-trust cases 
may be settled peaceably. 



RELIGIOUS NEWSPAPERS 

If there were no other reason, the fact that 
great secular weeklies and other irresponsible 
publications are dumping dangerous teaching 
into our homes should be sufficient to stir in- 
telligent Christian people on the subject of es- 
tablishing and maintaining religious newspa- 
pers. For instance, Collier's Weekly, a paper 
that goes almost everywhere and one that is 
highly esteemed by many people, recently de- 
voted a whole page to a discussion of the ques- 
tion, "How Old is Man?" The writer, ignor- 
ing the facts of divine revelation, proceeded 
to show that man; is descended from a lower 
order of animals existing in the prehistoric 
ages, and declares that "When fifty years ago 
Darwin published his 'Descent of Man,' there 
were many to doubt. Today not merely a miss- 
ing link, but all the missing links have been 
filled in." 

This is only a sample of the kind of stuff 
our people are welcoming into their homes, be- 
cause it is so cheap and because it is highly 
illustrated and served in attractive style. The 
article referred to is printed in such ornate 
and attractive style and with such catchy illus- 
trations as to get the eye of the child at a 
glance. 

We do not hesitate to say that Collier's Week- 
ly is not fit to be in the homes of Christian 
people, and we warn our readers to beware of 
it. Notwithstanding it has been posing as a 
reformer, there is nothing extant in the form of 
literature 'that is so much in need of refor- 
mation as this publication. It is only the more 
dangerous because of its pretense in the mat- 
ter of exposing frauds. 



Referring to the matter of religious news- 
papers, and the importance of their support, 
we reproduce the following which, though re- 
ferring directly to Baptist publications, is no 
less applicable to all other religious periodicals : 

"These later years, as we all know, have 
been hard on distinctly religious newspapers. 
Old papers which were thought to be thoroughly 
well established have disappeared. Many causes 
have contributed to this result. 

For some of these causes many church mem- 
bers are chiefly responsible. They have not 
subscribed for church papers as they ought. 
Some pastors have been extremely short- sight- 
ed in this respect. They ought to know that 
the general circulation of a good church paper 
in their congregations would greatly lighten 
their own labors, and would also greatly in- 
crease their efficiency. It would inform their 
people on all forms of denominational work 
at home and abroad. The newspaper makes its 
weekly appeal for education, for missions, and 
for the general conduct of religious life. Every 
pastor can tell quickly when he is making his 
pastoral calls whether or not those on whom he 
is calling take a denominational newspaper. 
Those who do not are pitifully ignorant on all 
matters of denominational interest. Their chil- 
dren also are without knowledge or interest 
in the life and work of the denomination. In 
the ease of such families the appeals of the 
pastor for benevolent objects are largely in 
vain. He is obliged to give information on 
matters of detail regarding which all intelli- 
gent Baptists are thoroughly well informed. It 
is not too much too say that the general cir- 
culation of a good religious paper is fully equal 
to the service of an assistant pastor. It is as 
much the duty of a Baptist pastor tn .see thav 
his people take a good Baptist paper as it is 
his duty to preach the gospel, to administer 
baptism, or to observe the Lord's supper. 

The time is coming when some religious news- 
papers will be endowed. It is as much our 
duty to endow them as to endow academies, 
colleges and theological seminaries. Why should 
not men and women of wealth give their money 
for religious newspapers as well as for educa- 
tional institutions. Are not religious newspa- 
pers educational institutions? Are not their 
weekly visits a genuine substitute for profes- 
sors and professional schools? Why should 
not men of wealth put money into the hands of 
pastors to furnish a weekly religious news- 
paper to young men and women and others 
too poor, or too indefferent, to subscribe for 
the paper? How could the money be better 
invested for the kingdom o fGod? Is not a 
great religious newspaper a tremendous force 
for righteousness ? Is it not a potent advocate 
for education, for missions, and for everything 
patriotic, educational and religious? It would 
be easy to point to men today in the Baptist 
ministry, men of commanding influence, who 
were converted to Baptist views by weekly 
visits to the home of their boyhood of a Bap- 
tist newspaper. It is simply impossible to es- 
timate the value for good and for God of the 
visits of such a paper in a family of growing 
children. How else can a few dollars be so 
wisely invested for the kingdom of God as in 
a good religious paper? Why should we not 
send the paper as a Christmas gift to many 
friends? Think of the silent but resistless 
influence of fifty-two visits of such a paper 
in the intellectual, social and religious life of 
a young family! 



It has been often said that the length of a 
prayer is in the inverse ratio to its earnestness. 
When the Master said, "After this manner 
pray ye, " a notable feature of the prayer thus 
presented as a model was its brevity. There is 
no risk for any of us to follow him in this all- 
important function of a true disciple 's life. 
—Selected. 



HortD Carolina CDiistian Advocate 

ESTABLISHED 18SS 



h. m. blair. Edkoi Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church, South $1.50 p« AnnummAdv.net 



Volumn LIX GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 15, 1914 Number 2 



♦ » 

♦ 

EDITORIAL 

i > 

AN EARLY ADVOCATE CAMPAIGN 

The Advocate campaign should be inaugu- 
rated at once, so that the paper may make its 
weekly visits throughout the year. The lists 
wilt go out now just as rapidly as they can be 
made ready, and we trust that each pastor will 
be kind enough to make the canvass for renew- 
als and new subscribers immediately, or see 
that it is made. F lease examine our list of 
premiums and prizes printed on the 16th page. 
It will be seen that there is a nice reward offer- 
ed for all who secure as many as ten or more 
new subscribers. Those who secure the number 
of new subscribers allotted and the renewal of 
the old list will be entitled to a place on the 
roll of honor. The wife of the pastor, or any 
one in the congregation can do the work if the 
pastor does not prefer to do it himself. All 
the premiums and prizes offered are genuine, 
first class goods. Nothing cheap or shoddy 
in the lot. We want to begin our report 
next week. Who will be first to place his 
name and charge on the roll of honor? 



ANOTHER STEP FORWARD 

The State Executive Committee of the North 
Carolina Anti-Saloon League has been called 
to meet in Raleigh on the 29th of this month. 
This will, in ill probability, be the most im- 
portant meeting ever held by the Committee, 
as it is evident the question must there and 
then be settled as to whether the League is 
to continue to be an aggressive force. So 
far in its history the League has steered clear 
of any sort of compromise with the enemy 
and the result has been one of continuous 
success, the whole history being but a series 
of victories for the cause of righteousness. 

The condition which now confronts us is 
one that calls for all the nerve of the Com- 
mittee, and of the temperance sentiment of 
the country to assert itself, and we sincerely 
hope there will be no back down by either 
the Committee or the people. The fact that li- 
quor can still be delivered by the express com- 
panies and carriers to people in North Carolina 
leaves the door wide open for the debauching 
of public morals. The experience of the recent 
holiday season has convinced observant men 
and women that the will of the people in their 
effort to have a state free from the demorali- 
zation of the liquor traffic is to be defeated as 
long as the express office can be converted 
into a dispensary. For this reason we hope 
the Committee may be a unit in the purpose 
to inaugurate a movement for an amendment 
which will prohibit the delivery of liquor in 
the state. 

It is with regret that we have heard of a 
purpose on the part of some even on the com- 
mittee to oppose such a step as radical and 
suicidal. As we see it, however, nothing can 
at this time be more ruinous and suicidal to 
the cause of prohibition in North Carolina 
than to leave things in their present shape. 
The people have thought for years that they 
were to have prohibition. If we leave things 



in their present shape they will know that 
they have been deceived, and no amount of ar- 
gument will suffice to convince them other- 
wise. 

This one step we lack in order to shut the 
door and seal it against the whiskey devil en- 
trenched outside the state. This step we con- 
fidently believe we will take. To this end let 
every member of the Executive Committee at- 
tend the meeting and get the forces in readi- 
ness to strike the final blow. 



EDITORIAL NOTES 

Replying to the oft repeated question, 
"What should a man do when he is sixty years 
old?" a friend with a reputation for great 
common sense, says: 

''What is a fellow to do when he is sixty 
years old?" Well, Dr. Osier said he should 
be chloroformed, you know. But the doctor 
didn't really mean it. He was simply indulg- 
ing in a little grim humor. But the humor 
was based upon facts. At sixty the average 
man finds it more difficult to do the things 
he has been accustomed to do, and to "put 
up with" the things he has been accustomed 
to "put up with." Then there is a marked 
disposition, in our day, to shelve the fellow 
whose sprinting qualities are beginning to fail. 
The people seem to think that if a fellow can't 
maintain the speed of his youth, ' 'enthuse ' ' 
over every little fad that comes" g along, and 
sputter around generally, his usefulness is 
gone. The truth is that a studious, thoughtful, 
energetic man is not at his best until he is 
about sixty years old. If the people would 
only consent for him to do the things he is 
fitted to do at that age, he would give them 
the most profitable service of his life. 

# # # * 

A warm personal friend residing in another 
state, where the Methodist Episcopal Church 
(has a strong following, while admitting the 
force of what we have had to say on the sub- 
ject of organic union of the two bodies, still 
finds it hard to see how the two could ever 
dwell together in peace. He says: 

There is force in what you say on the 
question of Methodist union, but I am afraid 
we could not live in peace with our Northern 
brethren. I see more of their spirit here than 
you do in North Carolina. It is much easier 
to love them at a distance than at close range. 
1 frankly confess that I do not like their spir- 
it. They have never kept a single compact 
they have made with us. The truth is, I am 
not partial to the Northern spirit in general. 
From the days of the Assyrian empire on 
down through the times of Goths and Vandals 
and Norsemen, to the present, northern people 
have shown a marked disposition to ignore 
the rights of southern people. There must be 
something peculiar about northern latitudes, 
or about northern blood. Oh, yes, I have been 
reconstructed in a sense, or to some extent, I 
might say. For one thing, I have got religion 
since I followed Joe Wheeler in the war be- 
tween the States. But even religion has not 
changed my views about some things. It has 
influenced my attitude toward them, however. 

* * * * , • - - 

The fact brought out here by our correspon- 
dent incidentally brings to the surface one of 



the strongest reasons for organic union of 
these bodies. The worst element of our sis- 
ter church has always been found in sections 
where they have operated in violation of their 
compact. This is perfectly natural. They were 
insurgents mainly in the time of the Civil 
War and they have been ecclesiastical insur- 
gents in the time of . peace. The only way 
to get rid of this element is to unite the two 
great bodies. Immediately the great major- 
ity of these insurgents would be out of a job 
so far as leadership is concerned, and the 
differences and strifes upon which they have 
feasted and lived would largely cease. 

The same thing is true with regard to the ne- 
gro question. Brother Jno. M. Price last week 
held up the scare-crow of the possibility of a 
negro Bishop. When the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church elects a negro Bishop without 
specifically defining the limits of his juris- 
diction the sun will be rising in the west and 
the whole order of natural law will have been 
changed. There is not the ghost of a chance 
for this social tragedy to be enacted. On the 
other hand, however, with a united church, 
strong and aggressive in the South as well as 
in the North, we would soon have a just per- 
spective on this question and the negro would 
receive the blessing which ought to come to the 
race through Methodism, but can never 
come fully till we have a united Methodism. 
The wonder is that Methodism has made the 
progress it has among the negroes with the 
conflicting influences that have been at work. 
Remove these influences by a strong and unit- 
ed organization which shall have eliminated 
all opportunity for local strifes, and espec- 
ially all motive for appealing to race prej- 
udice, and we will have paved the way for the 
only proper and permanent solution of the 
race question so far as we are related to it 
as a church. No church will ever provide 
for negro Bishops in white churches; but they 
will sometime provide for negro Bishops in 
negro churches, and they ought to do so. 
• .» # * 

Charlotte and Lexington will in February 
observe " Go-to-Church-Sunday. " These are 
the first towns in North Carolina to fall in line 
with towns and cities of the North and East 
in setting apart one Sunday when a special 
effort will be made to get all the people, who 
can possibly do so, to attend the church ser- 
vices on this particular Sunday. 

It is an effort to impress upon the minds of 
the people who are not accustomed to attend 
church that they are neglecting an important 
duty, and also to show by an actual demon- 
stration what it would mean to the churches 
of the community if all would be present each 
Sunday. This "Go-to-Church-Sunday" will 
also give the ministers an opportunity to re- 
mind the people of their duty, and to tell them 
of the advantages of regular church attendance. 

The movement had its origin last summer in 
Joliet, 111., and has been observed with marked 
success in many places of the middle West. 
Even staid New England has fallen in with the 
movement, the day being successfully observed 
by at least three towns in Massachusetts. 



"Love, like any other plant, needs constant 
cultivation. Left alone, it may wither and 
perish. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 15, 1914 



» » 

Contributions j 

» * 

FROM OLD VIRGINIA 

J. M. Rowland 

It is Christmas night. Many presents have 
been brought to the parsonage. Far beyond 
all it could expect this home has been remem- 
bered. It makes one feel humble and overcome 
at a time like this. We appreciate all pres- 
ents we received on account of their value and 
their usefulness, but far more do we value the 
thought and love that move the heart to drive 
the hand to give them. It is one of life's 
sweetest heritages to be remembered. It is 
one of life's worst calamities to be forgotten. 
You rather be mistreated than be forgotten. 
And there are those who remembered us but 
sent us nothing because they had naught to 
send. God bless them. Love does not always 
measure itself by weights and measures. Per- 
haps as God counts things the love and prayers 
of some who sent no package mean more than 
the dollars of some who are rich. 

The inventory has just been taken and run- 
neth thus: A rain coat, a ham, a barrel of 
oysters, two bags of peanuts, two assortments 
of souvenirs from country hog killings, sev- 
eral pieces of jewelry, wearing apparel, dry 
goods, notions, confections, fruit, flowers, and 
other things. Over on the table among the 
other things lies a loaf of bread. It would 
not bring but a nickle on the market and yet 
as eyes gaze on that loaf it grows larger than 
all the things about it as it rises toward the 
angels with the yeast of heaven in it. It is 
the widow's mite. She sent it to the parson- 
age today, nicely wrapped and sealed with a 
Red Cross seal. It was all she had to give. 
She hardly has bread enough to eat herself. 
She is old and crippled and every movement 
she made in the baking of that bread caused 
her pain. It was her gift — all she had to give 
to her preacher — and with it came her love 
and prayers. High up in the list of the things 
that come this way today, God wrote the old 
cripple widow 's loaf of bread. Maybe He wrote 
it at the top for that is the way God does 
things. 

# *,#■* 

Several days before Christmas three boys 
came home from school. They had just come 
from a conference of the boys who know it 
all. Among the other edicts, decrees and ulti- 
matums sent out by that body that day there 
came one to the effect that "there is no such 
things as Santa Claus." One of the three lit- 
tle fellows went homeward, swelled up and 
mad. The further he went the madder he got. 
He kicked a dog out of his way, ran into a 
little girl because he was so mad he didn't 
see her, and hit a boy who spoke to him. He 
was mad enough to fight the whole town be- 
cause those renegades had slandered his dear 
eld friend by saying he did not exist. It 
made him furious to think he had to go to 
school with such liars, and then to think that 
they might be right made him madder still. 

One of the other boys went home whistling, 
philosophy shining in his eyes. He had found 
out a great secret. In the long eventful eight 
years of his life he had been fooled by that old 
musty myth, but he would be fooled no more. 
With the triumph of a son who has out meas- 
ured his sire, he said, "Father, there's no 
such thing as a Santa Claus. ' ' The father had 
never in words said there was nor had he the 
heart to say there was not. He had been mum 
on that point, but from his actions and the way 
his face shone on Christmas morning the boy 
had read other things than doubt and disbe- 
lief in the children's friend. "All right, son," 
said the father slowly, ' ' I have heard that when 
boys talk like that old Santa Claus stops com- 



ing." The boy's face was grave. That raised 
an issue he had not weighed, and he answered 
quickly: "That's what the boys at school said, 
but that does not make it so." Whatever his 
thoughts may have been there has come from 
his lips no word of doubt since then, and he 
met his old friend with all his usual glee on 
Christmas morning. 

The third boy went home crying like his 
heart would break (boys are so different and 
yet so much alike.) With the news that old 
Santa Claus was false life to him was not worth 
living. One of his best friends was a fake 
and one of the sweetest things that ever touch- 
ed his heart was a delusion. You may have felt 
like he did. You have seen the mask fall from 
the face of a friend you loved and trusted, and 
you have found that friend unreal. Sad was 
it when you learned some of earth's most beau- 
tiful things were false and some things that 
seemed the sweetest chanced to be the bitter- 
est. For years you believed with all your soul 
in some things and some people. One day 
some one told you they were false. It almost 
broke your heart. It shook your faith in all 
things. Blessings on the boys and all of us who 
must learn that so much of life isn't what it 
seems. But wouldn't we like to put a seal 
upon the lips that tell us so? And isn't there 
a way to make it what it seems to be? Is 
Santa Claus a myth? Through all these years 
has he been false to the countless hearts that 
have beat faster at his coming? Will he not 
live forever in the human heart regardless of 
what these busy bodies say against him? You 
cannot, on your conscience tell the tales some 
have told, but will you rob the child heart of 
old Santa Claus? 

# # # # 

Along Broad Street on Christmas Eve the 
usual throng many thousands strong surged 
its way. Many faces frowned and smiled and 
many hearts beat their many different ways. 
The young were gay, and the old were both 
young and gay. Glad eyes, sad eyes, red eyes 
and blind eyes were blinking in the throng. 
The windows were all men and money could 
make them. At one of these windows stood 
an old man rubbing his eyes and gazing on, 
unconscious of the great crowd moving by him. 
He was weatherbeaten from many winters and 
sun burnt from many summers. His visage 
was grizzled. His hands were horny. The 
weight of years were on him and his clothes 
were not so very good. In the window was a 
fire burning brightly and everything looked 
home-like. The stockings, all sizes, were hang- 
ing in their places. (Modern steam pipes, reg- 
ister stoves, and holes in walls are miserable 
substitutes for the old fire place so fast taking 
its place with the things that are gone but not 
forgotten.) As the old man looked on the scene 
his eyes shone with a new light, his lips trem- 
bled, his heart beat faster and the tears started 
down his withered cheeks. He had been car- 
ried back through the fast flown years to a 
home passed away and to a scene like that. He 
was at home again. A child again and it was 
Christmas Eve. God bless the old hearts — some 
of them almost worn out — that on Christmas 
Eve went back through the far gone years, 
singing as they went : 

"Turn backward, turn backward, time in your 
flight, 

And make me a child again, just for tonight." 



INTERSTATE Y. M. C. A. CONVENTION 

The Eleventh Annual Interstate Convention 
of the Young Men's Christian Associations of 
the Carolinas will be held at Greenville, S. C, 
February 5-8. 

Greenville is one of the great Association 
cities of the South, having five active Asso- 
ciations. The first Cotton Mill Association in 
the country was organized at Monaghan Mills, 
a suburb of Greenville, eleven years ago, and 



since then similar work has been established at 
the Woodside Mills and the Mills Manufactur- 
ing Company. Each of the Associations ar 
well equipped. There is also a thriving S+ 
dent Association at Furman University. Dr. 1 
teat, the President of the Institution, bei% - 
cordial advocate of the Association Movem H 

The City Association will be the host of 
Convention. It has a modern building and 
planning to entertain the delegates royally. 

Owing to the importance of Greenville an 
its large Association constituency the Commit- 
tee on the Convention has endeavored to set 
up a program of more than usual strength and 
interest. Prominent among the speakers al- 
ready secured is the Honorable Josephus Dan- 
iels, Secretary of the Navy, who will speak at 
the Convention Banquet on Saturday night 
and at the Men's Meeting on Sunday after- 
noon. Secretary Daniels personally and 
through his paper, the News and Observer, of 
Raleigh, contributed in a large measure to the 
success of the building campaign in Raleigh. 
He has said recently that he had four reasons 
for doing so in his four boys and that he has 
sixty thousand reasons for encouraging the 
Young Men's Christian Association in the fact 
that there are that number of young men in the 
Navy. 

Another speaker whose presence and message 
will be greatly enjoyed is Mr. A. G. Knebel, 
who, as Interstate Secretary from 1898 to 1904, 
gained a host of friends and admirers in the 
Carolinas. He has been in the employ of the 
Railroad Department of the International Com- 
mittee since then, now having headquarters in 
St. Louis. In this capacity he has been remark- 
ably successful in his approach to all classes 
of railroad men from the humblest employee 
to the highest officials. He will give the key- 
note address on the opening night and appear 
frequently on the program. 

Dr. E. M. Poteat will give three inspirational 
addresses during the Convention, which will 
alone be worth the trip to Greenville. 

The three principal topics for consideration 
by the Convention will be: "The Boy Life 
of the Carolinas," opened by Mr. L. W. Dunn, 
Southern Boy's Secretary; "The Men and 
Boys in Industries," opened by Dr. E. H. T. 
Foster, Secretary of the Industrial Depart- 
ment of the Y. M. C. A., and ''The Men and 
Boys in Rural Districts," opened by Prof. W. 
K. Tate, Superintendent of the South Caro- 
lina Rural School Work. Ample time will 
be given for discussions of the problems con- 
nected with these subjects. 

Two other prominent Christian leaders have 
been secured in the persons of Dr. W. D. 
Weatherford, of Nashivlle, Student Secretary 
for the South, and Mr. Charles R. Towson, of 
New York, the head of the Industrial Depart- 
ment of the International Committee. 

Dr. Weatherford has recently returned from 
a tour of the Mission fields of the world and 
will speak on this subject Sunday night. He 
has been for over ten years a leading spirit 
in the Student Christian Association Move- 
ment of the South and it is largely through 
his wise and untiring efforts that the splendid 
equipment for Summer Conferences at Blue 
Ridge, North Carolina, has been provided. 

Mr. Towson is known all over the United 
States today as one of the ablest and best in- 
formed of the Welfare Workers of America. 
He is prominent in the councils of leading 
industrial organizations of the country. His 
department is promoting Y. M. C. A. work 
among cotton mill and steel mill employees, 
miners, immigrants, lumbermen and other class- 
es. Mr. Towson will address a popular meet- 
ing on the Friday night of the Convention 
upon the topic,- "The Y. M. C. A. and the 
Industrial Classes." He will also conduct the 
discussion of the above topic in the Conven- 
tion. 



January 15, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



Mr. B. G-. Alexander, of Knoxville, the Exe- 
cutive Secretary of the Association Movement 
in the South, and Mr. A. A. Jamison, Boy's 
Work Secretary of the Atlanta Association, 
d other prominent Association leaders, 
•'fcastors and delegates from Men's Leagues, 
Hica classes and other Christian organiza- 
I of men will be cordially welcomed to 
1 Convention and furnished with credentials 
'the Interstate officer. A program fee of 
ne dollar will be expected from each dele- 
te. 

Entertainment will be provided for all duly 
accredited delegates by the Greenville Associ- 
ation. This will include the Convention Ban- 
quet on Saturday night at a leading hotel, 
which will be a notable occasion. 

Further information may be obtained by ad- 
dressing the Interstate Committee, Association 
Building, Charlotte, N. C. 



THE BIBLE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL 

When the late proposed amendment to pro- 
hibit the Bible from being ruled out of the 
public schools was lost in the Legislature, it 
was predicted by the secular papers that the 
question would forever disappear from public 
view. It seems, however, that in this instance 
the wish was father to the thought, for sub- 
sequent events have shown, as has been shown 
so often before, that nothing is ever settled, 
till it is settled right. 

The Presbyterian Synod of this State, not 
as large as some other church bodies, it may 
be, but equally as influential, at once ranged 
herself on the side of those contending for 
the right of the Bible to be read by our chil- 
dren. 

Now the Methodist Conference, in session 
in this city, true to its historic position, has 
also declared in favor of the defeated amend- 
ment. 

,Snon the Baptist Association will meet in 
Shelby, N. C, and it may be that this church, 
which claims to be permanently a Bible church, 
will also be found with us. 

It is possible, of course, that the question 
may be prevented from coming up in view of 
the division of sentiment among them; because 
while some of their prominent men have openly 
opposed it, it is also true that other prominent 
men, such as W. C. Dowd, of this city, fought 
for its adoption. For those brethren who op- 
posed it, and who were largely instrumental 
dn securing its defeat, we have the utmost 
respect. We have read their arguments, and 
we can easily see how men, viewing the question 
as they do, could do nothing else than oppose 
any amendment that interfered with religious 
liberty. 

The man, however, who had most to do with 
its rejection was Judge Clark, the Chief Justice 
of this State, who opposed it in the daily press, 
giving it as his opinion that it would interfere 
with the religious liberty of the individual. 
This opinion from so eminent authority of 
course carried great weight, especially with the 
secular press. 

It seems, however, that the learned judge 
was not entirely unbiased in his views, but 
he had some debts to pay by means of his oppo- 
sition. His position has lately been revealed 
in an indirect way. 

He recently charged the last Legislature was 
influenced by lobbyists, employed by his special 
horror, the railroads. The Statesville Land- 
mark, in defending the Legislature against 
the charge, brings to light the fact that the 
Judge himself wrote to a prominent Hebrew 
who had been one of his chief supporters, polit- 
ically to come at once to Raleigh and lobby 
against this amendment. 

We .here find him encouraging lobbying 
against the Bible, though fighting lobbying in 
favor of the railroads, and then we find that 
the possible motive for his position to pay polit- 



ical debts to a Hebrew by opposing the Bible 
in our schools. 

We may be doing an injustice to the Judge, 
but such is the impression, not only in our 
mind, but among the public generally. 

This country was settled by Protestants, men 
who brought the Bible with them, and they 
granted an asylum to men of every belief, but 
it was with the understanding that they should 
respect our views and not attempt to interfere 
with our worship. 

We believe that the Bible has made our land, 
and that our children should be taught it, and 
we expect those who have come since, to respect 
our wishes. We have no desire to teach any 
creed, nor do we wish to unsettle the faith of 
children. We only wish that our children 
should know the facts of the Bible and the 
beauty of its literature. How that can hurt 
Hebrews or Romanists, we cannot see. — Presby- 
terian Standard. 



THE UNITED MISSIONARY CAMPAIGN 

D. Clay Lilly, Field Secretary 

This great campaign, inaugurated by more 
than fifty of the largest Foreign and Home Mis- 
sion Boards of the United States and Canada, 
has been carried on vigorously since early fall. 
It is estimated that six hundred conferences, 
in as many cities, will be held during this fall 
and winter. 

When it is remembered that each one of these 
conferences reaches a number of churches, some 
idea of the breadth of this campaign is appar- 
ent at once. 

And when it is remembered that each one of 
these conferences means the adoption of new 
methods, and a permanent increase in mission- 
ary giving on the part of some churches, their 
value is seen at once. 

There is very little expense attached to one 
of these conferences, and this, when shared by 
all the churches of a city, is inconsiderable 
for any one of them. 

Of how much value a conference can be is 
evidenced by the words of these two pastors, 
whose testimony might be multiplied many 
times over. 

One of them says : ' ' Referring to the recent 
sessions of the United Missionary Campaign 
held in our town, I wish to say to you, as I 
am saying to my friends everywhere, that I 
have lived in Mt. Carroll fifteen years, during 
which time many good and great things have 
happened; but this conference is the biggest 
thing, and has set in motion a movement which 
means more to us at home and abroad in the 
Kingdom of Christ than any other thing our 
town has experienced during these years." 

Another pastor writes: "You don't know 
how much good your coming to us has done. 
I believe this Laymen's Conference will touch 
with spiritual power the various congregations 
of our city. The meeting has been highly edu- 
cational, spiritual, interesting, and in every 
way helpful." 

During January, February and March con- 
ferences will be held in the South in Virginia, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Flor- 
ida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama and Mis- 
sissippi, and later in Louisiana, Arkansas and 
Texas. 

The Home and Foreign Mission Boards of 
all the Churches of the South are cordially 
supporting this campaign and some of their 
most effective men are heard in these confer- 
ences from time to time. It is a great manifes- 
tation of the spiritual unity of the church and 
this immense movement, international and in- 
terdenominational, goes forward with increas- 
ing power. 



TIDINGS FROM THE MISSION FIELD 

An Ovreplowing Hospital 
With the exception of a short while during 
China New Year and the revolution this sum- 



mer, the hospital has been full all the time 
and has been forced to turn away many pa- 
tients. More room has been made for pa- 
tients and quite a number of new beds bought. 
In fact, all the available space in the building 
has a bed in it. We have had a record year 
in patients, an increase of 227 over last year, 
which was a very large increase over all for- 
mer years. The opium patients increased by 
211 and the surgical by .12. At the present 
time the third class opium ward has two pa- 
tients in every bed, so heavy is the demand to 
break this habit. — John A. Snell, Soochow Hos- 
pital, China. 

Japan Not Yet Evangelized 

"Approximately eighty per cent, of the to- 
tal population of Japan, or above forty mil- 
lions, reside in rural districts, of which num- 
ber — so far as our data indicates — ninety-six 
per cent, constitute an entirely unworked field. 
Of the remaining twenty per cent, of the total 
population residing in cities and towns, about 
one-fifth is still unprovided for, thus giving as 
the result that above eighty per cent, of the 
population of Japan are not being directly 
reached by the evangelistic forces. A gigantic 
and yet most inspiring task, therefore, still 
lies before us in the Christianization of Ja- 
pan, which calls, first of all, for renewed hu- 
miliation, deeper consecration, and a larger 
spiritual life." — Committee on the Distribu- 
tion of Forces, Japan. — (Mrs. W. A. Wilson.) 

Days op Preparation In Africa 

Every day for the past three days we have 
met in one of the cabins and spent half an 
hour in prayer, after which Dr. Morrison gives 
us a half hour on the Baluba language, and 
the alternate day on missionaries and their 
relation to government officials, to the natives 
and to other missions in the Congo. In this 
way we are availing ourselves of his large and 
helpful experience. It is a gracious provi- 
dence which has permitted his being with us. 
— W. R. Lambuth, en route to Africa. 

The Word In Cuba 

A sign very favorable to Protestantism in 
Cuba is the increased circulation of the Scrip- 
tures during the nine months of the year up 
to September 30. In spite of scarcity of mon- 
ey and abundance of lottery ticket sellers, the 
colporteurs and agent of the American Bible 
Society, aided by the pastors, have circulated 
over 23,000 copies of the Scriptures. The cir- 
culation for the year will easily pass thirty 
thousand, a record breaking circulation for Cu- 
ba. "The word of God is not bound."— S. 
A. Neblett, Santa Clara, Cuba. 

Answering God's Call In China 

There is a most encouraging turning of our 
students toward the ministry and teaching. 
Presiding Elder Lea, who is also pastor of the 
local church, has recently conducted revival 
services for two weeks with the students. As 
a result a class of fifteen young men are meet- 
ing daily for special study and prayer look- 
ing to church membership. Two of our grad- 
uates now teaching in non-mission schools 
have recently written the Presiding: Elder their 
decision to enter the ministry. — W. B. Nance, 
Soochow University, China. 

"Making Character" 

The work at the college is going on with 
the same satisfactory results. The boys have 
recently set to work to increase our library, 
and have added more than 200 books. A good 
deal of excellent literature, much of it trans- 
lated by Brother Price, is published each month 
in the little magazine. A 'cultured patron 
of the school recently came from Alegrete to 
visit us, and before leaving said, "Now I un- 
derstand your catalogue and what you are try- 
ing to do. You make character here." — Ander- 
son Weaver, Urguayana, Brazil. 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 15, 1914 



» » » 

From the Field 

» * 

NOTES AND PERSONALS 

— Rev. and Mrs. E. E. Williamson are de- 
lighted with their new charge at Franklin. 

— Eev. A. L. Stanford, of Hickory, visited 
relatives in the old home neighborhood in Sur- 
ry last week. 

— Mrs. M. P. Clegg, who has been living 
with her son, Eev. M. B. Clegg, at King's 
Mountain, has gone to Florida for the winter. 

—Rev. H. H. Jordan, the popular pastor of 
our church at Morganton, suffered a severe 
pounding at the hands of his people January 
1st. 

■ — Rev. J. P. Lanning, who took a super- 
numerary relation at the late Conference, has 
removed to Greensboro and will engage in bus- 
iness here. 

— Rev. B. A. York and family are thank- 
ing the people of First church, Hickory, for 
an unexpected pounding. Brother York serves 
the Hickory circuit. 

— We regret to learn that Rev. J. R. Scroggs 
is ill at his home in Shelby, suffering with 
sciatica. We trust he may soon find relief 
and full restoration to health. 

— Our people at Washington Street, High 
Point, are going forward rapidly with their 
new church, which when completed is expect- 
ed to cost more than fifty thousand dollars. 

— Rev. T. J. Rogers and family, of LincoTn- 
ton, were generously pounded by the people 
of their congregation on January 1st. Brother 
Rogers has good staying qualities and the peo- 
ple are fond of him. 

— The Methodist congregation of Main St. 
church are pleased with their new pastor, Rev. 
D. H. Litaker. He is a strong preacher and 
has already secured a strong hold on his con- 
gregation. He and his family are now at home 
in the parsonage. — Thomasville Cor. Davidson 
Dispatch. 

— Rev. A. G. Gantt, who has been living 
at San Benito, Texas, has recently removed 
to Fort Worth, and friends will note that hi;? 
address is now 1211, Hemphill St., Fort Worths 
Texas. He writes that his health is still very 
poor and that he hopes for some benefit by 
his change of residence. 

■ — A note from Rev. B. Margeson to the 
editor conveys a message of love to all the 
brethren of the Western North Carolina Con- 
ference and gives his permanent address as 
617 Jefferson St., Neosho, Mo. Brother Mar- 
geson has many warm friends among our read- 
ers who will be glad to hear from him. 

— The Thomasville correspondent of the Lex- 
ington Dispatch, referring to the marriage of 
Rev. P. E. Parker, says: — This is Rev. Par- 
ker's fourth year at this charge and during 
his pastorate he has endeared himself to his 
congregation as well as to all throughout the 
community. One and all wish for him and his 
bride many years of usefulness and happiness. 

— Rev. Dr. J. J. Hall, of Atlanta, Ga., in 
comoany with Mr. F. S. Blair, of Guilford 
Colleee, made the Advacate office a pleasant 
call on Friday of last week. Dr. Hall was 
here in the interest of the Peace Convention 
and Intercollegiate Contest, which it is pro- 
posed to hold in this state at an early dav. 
It is suggested that the Convention be held 
in this city and the Chamber of Commerco 
and other organizations have the matter un- 
der advisement. 

- — Rev. Dr. R. D. Smart, one of the best 
known ministers of our church, died at Char- 
lottsville, Ya., on Sunday, January 4th. Dr. 
Smart began his work in the South Carolina 
Conference where he rose rapidly as a preacher 
and pastor, and was sought for by the church 
at large. He served churches in St. Louis, and 



for some years has been a member of the 
Virginia Conference, where he served some 
of the most important charges in various cit- 
ies. He was much loved wherever he went. 

— Special missionary meetings were held in 
Main Street church, Gastonia, on Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday nights of last week. 
Messrs. S. J. Durham, Geo. W. Wilson, A. E. 
Woltz, J. H. Separk and other laymen and 
local preachers were on the program. This 
church has been supporting Rev. W. A. Wil- 
son, in Japan, for some years and we have no 
doubt will continue to do so. The congrega- 
tion has some of our strongest laymen and is 
growing in intelligent interest in all the en- 
terprises of the church. 

— Rev. J. J. Barker, who was appointed 
evangelist for this Conference at the late ses- 
sion, is now located at Biltmore and ready 
and anxious to serve wherever the way may 
open for him. The winter months in many 
places are favorable for revival work, and we 
hope the brethren who need Brother Barker's 
assistance will not ' allow him to be idle during 
these months. If he is to succeed in the im- 
portant work to which he has been appointed 
there must be co-operation on the part of pas- 
tors. All correspondence should be addressed 
to him at Biltmore, N. C. 

— We have learned with deep regret of the 
death of Mrs. Avett, wife of Rev. E. M. Avett 
pastor of the Salisbury circuit, which occurred 
at the parsonage at Granite Quarry on Monday 
of last week, January 5th. Mrs. Avett had 
been in poor health for quite a while, having 
been a victim of the dread disease, pelagra. 
Her death was not unexpected. Great sym- 
pathy is felt for Brother Avett and the two 
little children that survive. The body was 
laid to rest at Stony Hill, near Albemarle, 
on Tuesday. .May the comfort of divine grace 
be given tOr f the bereaved family. 

— We. have learned with deep regret of the 
death of Mrs. Samantha Doggett, widow of 
the late J. ; Lewis Doggett, which occurred sud- 
denly at thfe family home in Rutherford Coun- 
ty on Saturday morning. She was the moth- 
er of Rev. R. L. Doergett, of our Conference, 
and leaves several children, among them Mrs. 
E. N. Crowder and Mrs. D. P. Tate, faithful 
and devoted wives of Methodist preachers. 
The editor of the Advocate came in close 
touch with Sister Doggett when her children 
were young and knows of the godly influence 
she exerted in her home. It is no surprise 
that these children have been true to God and 
to their church. 

— Charlotte and other North Carolina cit- 
ies are extending invitations to Bishop John 
C. Kilgo to make his home within their re- 
spective borders, it being conceded that he is 
to move frpm Durham. South Carolina has 
no bishop living in the State and as he is a 
native of South Carolina, it strikes us that the 
thing for Bishop Kilgo to do when he moves 
is to move over into South Carolina, and of 
course come straight to Greenwood. — Green- 
wood Index. — (Bishop Kilgo belongs in a pe- 
culiar sense to both North and South Caro- 
lina. So if there is to be a change of residence 
we insist that Charlotte is a good compromise, 
as it is practically on the line. — Editor Advo- 
cate. 

— Rev. J. A. B. Fry, pastor of our church in 
Berkeley, Cal., left on the fifth for a trip to 
Europe. Ho expects Ito return by way of 
North Carolina in March and spend some time 
among friends in this state. In a letter to 
the editor , he says: "I am taking with me 
some very beautiful slides of California and 
the Exposition. If any of the Women's So- 
cieties will furnish lantern I shall be glad to 
show them in a few of our churches. Of 
course my work is free. ' ' This will afford an 
opportunity for some of our societies to make 
some money and we hope they will avail them- 
selves of the opportunity. North Caro- 



lina friends will give Brother Fry a hearty wel- 
come on his visit. 

—The board of stewards of the First Meth- 
odist church last night endorsed the idea of 
paying a salary to teachers in the primary de- 
partment of the Sunday school as advanced 
by the chairman of the board, Prof. A. T. 
Allen. A committee was appointed to solicit 
contributions to put the scheme in effect and 
to assist the Sunday school officers in their 
work. It was explained that the salary was 
not to pay the teachers for their work of 
teaching on Sunday but to encourage them 
and compensate them for time spent during 
the week in preparation and to enable them 
to keep up-to-date in methods of handling the 
little tots. The amount figured on for this 
year is $500. — Salisbury Post, Jan. 7th. 

— One of the most enjoyable occasions in 
Methodist circles in this city for the season 
was the Wesley Dinner given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Chas. H. Ireland, at their beautiful home on 
West Gaston Street on Friday evening of 
last week in honor of the Methodist ministers 
of the city and their wives. This is becom- 
ing a fixed custom of brother and sister Ire- 
land and the ministers look forward to it as 
the social bright spot in the year. All the 
pastors of the city were present except Rev. 
A. R. Bell and wife, whose inability to at- 
tend was deeply regretted. Our kind host and 
hostess love Methodist preachers, not forget- 
ting to include those who have strayed off to 
the work of editor, college president, or even 
one sentenced to the presiding eldership. All 
such shared with the pastors on this occasion 
and felt, at least for the time being, that they 
were really numbered among the somebodies. 

— On Wednesday, the 14th inst, a good wo- 
man, a Methodist, and a Mother in Israel, 
living quietly with her daughter, Mrs. W. H. 
Sloan, on Chestunt Street, this city, reached 
the ripe age of ninety years, hale and hearty and 
in the full possession of all her faculties. We re- 
fer to Mrs. Mary Ann Fulf ord Perry, formerly 
of Davie county, and for many years a resident 
of Farmington. Mrs. Perry was born in Da- 
vie county, January 14th, 1824. She was the 
daughter of William and Mary Jarvis Ful- 
ford, who came as a young married couple 
in the early days of the settlement from Cur- 
rituck county. She was one of a family of 
seven children. She professed religion and 
joined the church at old Olive Branch church, 
in Davie county, seventy years ago, and has 
lived an exemplary Christian life through all 
the years. She married William A. Perry, 
with whom she lived happily till his death, 
some forty years ago. They established a nice 
home and reared a family of eleven children, 
five of whom are still living. Mr. Perry was 
an active and intelligent church worker anl 
their home was a preacher's home in the old 
days. There are thirty-eight grand children, 
of whom twenty-four are living, and twenty- 
nine great grandchildren and three great great 
grandchildren. Among the grandchildren is 
Rev. Louis C. Perry, of the Southwest Missouri 
Conference, who has for several years been pres- 
ident of the Scarritt-Morrisville College at Mor- 
risville, Mo., under whose administation an en- 
dowment of $100,000. was recently completed. 
The editor of the Advocate was the pastor of 
this good woman twenty-five years ago and 
is glad to have her now as one of his near 
neighbors. There is not in the circle of our 
acquaintance a more cheering and beautiful 
example of the Christian faith. We trust she 
may live to round out a century. 



Missionary Collections 

For years our Conference has been passing 
resolutions with reference to early missionary 
collections. Our last Conference by .unani- 
mous vote decided to undertake to raise the 
domestic missionary assessment in full in Jan- 
uary and February, and the foreign in March 



January 15, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



and April. A few have sent in checks, but 
we shall have to get busy if we succeed in this. 

I am ready to send receipts to all the preach- 
ers for every dollar of the missionary money. 
At the end of each month I shall send to the 
Advocate a list of receipts on both domestic 
anA foreign accounts. If the amounts you 
send 1 cover your assessment, please so state. 

R. M. Courtney, Treas. 



Murphy Circuit 

Rev. T. L. Noble, the pastor, writes that he 
has found a good and kind people and that 
he has made a good beginning on the charge. 
On the 30th day of January, twenty-five of 
the young people gave the pastor and family 
a great pounding, for which they are grateful. 
The pastor is praying for a good and success- 
ful year. 



Forward Movement at Mount Airy 

I have just had at my church a week's 
services in the interest of foreign missions. 
Rev. R. M. Hoyle preached three evenings ; Dr. 
C. W. Byrd one; Rev. W. L. Hutchins, one, 
and Rev. Frank Siler, Conference Missionary 
Secretary, brought the week to a close by two 
strong addresses on Sunday. 

Pledges were taken at the Sunday morning 
service, which was followed by general canvass 
of the membership in the afternoon. The re- 
sult is that including our regular assessment 
of $155-00, we have provided $700_00 for 
the support of one of the twenty new mis- 
sionaries for which the church was asked to 
pray during the week. 

No high pressure methods were used. Bro. 
Siler 's coming to us has helped us. His ad- 
dress to the Sunday school was effective. 

"Very truly, W. H. Willis. 



Trumpet Call from a Presiding Elder 

At the recent session of our Annual Confer- 
ence the Committee on Books and Periodical? 
in their report which was read and adopted, 
recommended the inauguration of an imme- 
diate and vigorous campaign for a net gain of 
2,000 subscribers to the North Carolina Chris- 
tian Advocate. Of this number 215 were al- 
lotted to the Winston District, which is a 
modest number for us to secure. 

The Committee recommended further: "The 
distribution of the above allotment to the dif- 
ferent pastoral churges bv the same method 
as last year, and we would urge our pastors 
and official boards to begin at once a thorough 
canvass, beginning with the official members, 
to raise their allotment." 

The distribution has been made for the Win- 
ston District and the pastors have been notified 
of the allotment to their respective charges. 
Brethren, let us do this piece of important 
work at once, at most, finish by not later than 
the last Sunday in February. 

If the official brethren will come to the help 
of the pastors the work can be finished by 
February 2nd. Faithfully yours, 

H. K. Boyer, P. E. 

Forest City 

We have been pleasantly deceived by the 
good people of the Forest City charge — all 
the congregations — which was no surprise to 
us, for this was expected from a people who 
enjoy the reputation of being loyal and true 
to their pastors. Many of the people I had 
the pleasure of knowing in other days. They 
were my friends then and they have been 
very free since I came to this charge to express 
their continued friendship and delight in hav- 
ing me to succeed so good and true a man 
as brother Moser proved himself to be. I have 
always found it much easier to follow a faith- 
ful pastor than one otherwise. I speak from 
experience; for I have followed both kinds. 
We all make it more or less easy or difficult 



for our successors. We should endeavor to 
leave wide open doors to the hearts ' and homes 
for the man of God who is to come in and take 
up the work where we leave off and carry it 
on to greater achievements than it was possible 
for us to accomplish. No man ever finishes 
his job, even during a quadrennium, and so 
he should leave his job in such a condition 
that his successor would find no difficulty in 
taking up the work of the Kingdom of our 
Lord and prosecute it with greater success 
than had crowned his most consecrated efforts. 
But I did not intend to philosophize. 

It gives me pleasue to say that we have 
received two "poundings" recently — one by 
the good people of Mt. Holly and Belmont on 
Thanksgiving, while the pastor was at Confer- 
ence, and one since we came to Forest City. 
You see we have been "pounded" in our "go- 
ing out" and in our "coming in," and yet we 
have had no feelings of resentment; for they 
were "love licks," for which we have always 
cultivated a spirit of perfect submission and 
an earnest plea for more "lieks. " 

Very" cordially, 

J. A. Bowles. 



Attention! Waynesville District 

Not in consideration of discussions which 
you did not hear, but of plans laid which we 
earnestly hope you will prayerfully consider 
and conscientiously act upon. The district 
stewards' pastors' and lay leaders' meeting 
was held at Sylva January 6th and 7th. The 
business of the stewards, to be considered as a 
body, was soon dispatched by the eight stew- 
ards present, and commissive duties of their 
secretary designated. Then came the pastors' 
and lay leaders' meeting in which there was 
earnest and prayerful discussion of some very 
live and vital topics, such as The Evangeliza- 
tion of Our Home Field, Personal arid' Pastoral 
Evangelism, Tithing, and other important sub- 
jects; 

The presiding elder, Dr. Frank -Siler, Prof. 
A. C. Reynolds, J. Robert Long- Rev. J. H. 
Anderson and the nine pastors present had 
part in the discussions. Dr. Siler made a 
stirring missionary address Tuesday night. 
Brother West was present and spoke in the 
interest of the Children's Home, and then a 
committee was appointed to look after the ap- 
portionment to the district for the Home. 

Now for the practical and vital issues be- 
fore us. 

1. It was decided that the pastors of the 
district should put themselves at the disposal 
of the presiding elder for at least two meet- 
ings during the year. 

2. That we fix as a goal the conversion of 
at least 2,000 souls, and a net increase in 
every charge on profession of faith of at 
least ten per cent, of the present member- 
ship of the several charges. 

3. That we call our men together as soon 
as possible for earnest prayer for the out- 
pouring of the Holy Spirit, wise planning for 
the year in the interest of the Sunday school, 
organization, and systematic giving. 

4. That we will endeavor to raise in the dis- 
trict a special of $1,000 this year, five hun- 
dred of which will be applied i nthe district, 
and the other five hundred to be sent as a for- 
eign special to support a circuit preacher. 

The presiding elder started the subscrip- 
tion with $50.00 and Dr. Siler followed with 
tion with $5.00 and Dr. Siler followed with 
another fifty. 

The following resolution was passed: "Re- 
solved that we attempt to hold a 'men's meet- 
ing of the male membership within next month 
in all the churches of the district so far as 
practicable. First, to enlist the - membership 
of the church in constant prayer for a great 
outpouring of the Spirit upon the churches 
and communities, and to systematically study 
God's Word in an organized class. 



Second, To lay on the consciences of the 
membership of the churches obligations to 
give, and that the contributions be made reg- 
ularly according to carefully devised business 
methods. 

Signed, A. C. Reynolds. 

Brethren, we have planned large things, but 
our God is a great God. "He is able to do 
exceeding abundantly above all that we ask 
or think." 

M. F. Moores, Miss. Sec. 

Waynesville Dist. 



To the Subscribers of the American Issue in 
North Carolina 

The Central Committee of the Anti -Saloon 
League, in a meeting on the 31st inst., con- 
sidered the displacing of the American Issue 
with the New Republic, and instructed me to 
follow my judgment in this matter, t have 
had it under advisement ever since the Colum- 
bus Convention and have concluded that the 
change is very desirable ; therefore, in the near 
future the subscribers to the American Issue 
will be receiving the New Republic in lieu 
of the American Issue. 

The readers are to be congratulated on this 
change. The New Republic is a weekly, and 
a live wire, too. Its issue of January 2nd 
is the first number of the second volume and 
at that date their subscribers list was 72,920. 
Speaking of the 3^ear's work and the reception 
with which the paper has met, the editor says, 
in this issue : 

"With this issue, The Republic enters upon 
the second year of its existence. It comes 
under the wire in front of the Grand Stand 
with nearly 25,000 yearly paid up subscrib- 
ers and more than twice that number of short 
term subs. It is time of rejoicing, yet in the 
first year's showing there is a note of solemn, 
grateful reflection. 

The paper has lost money during the year, 
but we entered upon the project well know- 
ing that we would lose money and were pre- 
pared for it. We will continue to lose money 
until the yearly subscription list approaches 
the 100,000 mark. We knew this when we 
entered upon this enterprise just as well as 
we know it now. It was no leap in the dark. 
So we have no complaint to make about that. 
We have no complaints to make about any- 
thing. With such a host of loyal friends as 
has this little sheet, it would be a measly soul 
that would set up a growl upon this, its first 
birthday. 

Upon our lists are the names of thousands 
of victims of drink — men who have tickled 
the tail of the adder and got stung — many of 
them unto death. That we have a chance to 
light up the pathway of these folks, to 
strengthen and cheer them during the year, is 
an opportunity of which the King might well 
be proud. 

Upon our lists are probably a thousand In- 
dians and men and women directly engaged 
in their uplift. That we have had the chance 
to speak to them, to aid in correcting some 
of their wrongs, to bring into the limelight 
some of their native virtues, makes a season 
of rejoicing in this cheap sanctum not equalled 
in any castle on the tallest hill of Europe. 

What shall be the record of the year to 
come? The answer is partly in the keeping 
of our friends. We will lose a little more 
money each week and each month until the 
100,000 goal is reached but we are not yet 
broke and don't expect to get into that fix." 

There may be some little delay in making 
this change, so that if you who receive the 
American Issue are not getting the New Re- 
public by the 15th of February, please no- 
tify this office Yours truly, 

R. L. Davis, Supt., 
N. C. Anti-Saloon League. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 15, 1914 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mrs. W. R. Harris, Asheville, N. C. 



A BACKWARD LOOK 

So goes the old year forth, as goes 
A king with no attending train, 

As goes a monarch old, who knows 
His further effort is in vain. 

In stately sequence they have gone — 
The courtier months — and now, 
alone, 

The old year proudly falters on, 
The new year comes to claim his 
throne. 

But we that stand as subjects stand 

Within the temple of the years, 
While faints ithe narrow thread of 
sand 

That in the time-glass now appears, 
Should we look out adown the way 

Whereon our eager feet would fare, 
Or should we gaze at yesterday 

And see what is recorded there? 

Aye, backward then a moment's 

space — 

Look backward at the dimming 
hills, 

Ere yet old time with gentle grace, 

With drifting haze the distance fills; 
Count now the heights which held the 
goals 

Which had been ours to win and 

keep, 

Save that we in our shrinking souls 
Feared that the climb was too long 
and steep. 

Now the horizon whence wt wend 
Seems but a path all smooth and 
fair 

Where frowning hill and valley blend, 
And any load were light to bear. 

Could we go back! Ah, might we go 
Once more upon the dwindling way! 

The trials would not fret us so — 
The trifles, now, of yesterday. 

So in the temple of the years 

We gaze back at the fading view — 
The composite of laughs and tears — 

Then turn to face the roadway new, 
The new year comes as comes a king, 

Apparelled in rich stuffs and gold — 
Grant unto it that we may bring 

The good we garnered from the old. 

— Wilbur D. NesUt. 



"Another year is but the call of God 
To do some deed undone and duty we 
forgot; 

To think some wider thought of man 
and good; 

To see and love with kindlier eye and 

warmer heart." 
Come let us find if there be not some 

reason 

For longer life, to larger motive and 
a holier way." 



In response to cordial invitations, 
it was the pleasure of your Editor and 
the Asheville District Secretary, Mrs. 
V. L. Stone, to be present at the New 
Year mettings of the Hendersonville 
and Tryon auxiliaries, to plan with 
these workers for the successful car- 
rying on of the work during this 
year. 

Apart from the social pleasures at- 
tendant upon this visit we feel that 
the coming together with these good 
women has strengthened us and that 
we are better able to do the work that 
God has committed to us. 

At Hendersonville the meeting was 
held at the home of the President, 
Mrs. Dr. C. Few, and notwithstanding 
the fact that the ground was white 
with snow and the weather was ex- 
tremely cold, a goodly number of the 
members was present to enjoy the 
interesting program that had been ar- 
ranged. During the afternoon Mrs. 
Stone spoke most interestingly on the 
"Need of a Larger Prayer Life" and 
urged the auxiliary to a greater work 
ug8y eaur xrheratiaoteaitel N lfsgpr 
during this year. The publicity work 
was presented and its importance was 



stressed by the Conference Superin- 
tendent and an auxiliary Superinten- 
dent was chosen "then and there" for 
this work. With a corps of faithful 
officers, a loyal and enthusiastic mem- 
bership, we shall expect to hear more 
good news from this society. Hender- 
sonville is laying plans for the coming 
Annual Missionary Conference and we 
predict a great and successful meet- 
ing with those good people. 

Tryon is a very young society, hav- 
ing been organized during the second 
quarter of last year. Though they 
are small in numbers, having a mem- 
bership of only ten, they are large 
in enthusiasm and are looking for- 
ward to a good year's work. 

The program for this meeting was 
an "all-day program," and the morn- 
ing prayer and praise service was 
held at the home of one of the mem- 
bers, Mrs. Ford. In the afternoon at 
the church another meeting was held. 
Talks were made by the visitors, plans 
were formulated, and we trust this 
year is going to mean a great deal 
for this auxiliary. A Junior Division 
will be organized within a few days, 
with Miss Maude Ballew as leader. 

For the past several weeks the Study 
Circle of the Woman's Missionary So- 
ciety of Central church, Asheville, has 
been studying "Mormonism, the Islam 
of America," by Bruce Kinney. in 
view of the fact of the wide spread 
of Mormonism and its rapid growth, 
a committee x^s appointed at the 
last meeting to draft a resolution to 
be presented at the Annual Meeting 
at Hendersonville looking to legisla- 
tion in this matter. At the meeting 
of the Council of Women for Home 
Missions which was held in Fifth Av- 
enue Baptist church, New York, Dec. 
3-4, discussion of the Mormon problem 
brought the need of securing an 
amendment to the constitution which 
will prohibit polygamy. A follow-up 
campaign was suggested as meeting 
the present need. When the Mormon 
elder or Mormon missionary visits a 
locality, committees from the auxil- 
iary should follow in his wake and 
distribute anti-Mormon literature. 
More than 66,500 copies of "Mormon- 
ism, the Islam of America," were sold 
last year. 



SOME SEARCHING QUESTIONS— 
WHICH? 

Non-Christian nations are new plas- 
tic and responsive — Africa bleeding, 
China calling, Japan advancing, Korea 
emerging, India restless, the Philip- 
pines pleading, the nations turning 
away from the partial truth of Rom- 
anism. The civilization of these lands 
will^ be Christian, heathen or pagan — 
which? 

Since 1905 we have averaged almost 
a million immigrants a year. Since 
1910 sixty-one per cent, of these have 
come from the countries where there 
is no open Bible. Shall these aliens 
be Americanized or America be alien- 
ized- — which? 

About forty^seven per cent, of our 
population lives in cities, about two- 
thirds of the wealth of the United 
States is in the cities, hence the cities 
control the country. Shall Christ or 
gross materialism rule ithe cities— 
which? 

Why? 

Only about one-eighth of the women 
of Southern Methodism are in the 
missionary societies. Why? 

Less than ten per cent, of our chil- 
dren are enlisted in the missionary 
cause. Why? 

The great mass of our young peo- 
ple are inactive religiously and are 
drifting away from the church. Why? 

Not one-tenth of our membership 
even profess to be stewards. Why? 

Not one-fourth of the members of | 



missionary societies regularly study 
the mission fields and problems. Why? 
Christ's Question 
"Lovest thou me? Feed my lambs." 
"Lovest thou me?" Shepherd my 
sheep." "Lovest thou me? Feed my 
sheep." — Selected. 



SOME SOLEMN FACTS 

This is the age of greatest mission- 
ary opportunity — the age of open 
doors. Prayer opened the doors; in- 
difference cannot shut them, but it 
may keep Christ out. The life of a 
great nation is being molded for good 
or ill. The kind of mothers, the kind 
of homes, the kind of children tnere 
are to be in the Orient during the 
next generation is being determined 
by our attitude toward the present 
crisis in the East. Whether the Lann 
countries are to become more Chris- 
tian of more pagan depends upon 
whether we will increase the little 
leaven that it may leaven the whole 
country. 

The future of our own nation is 
not yet assured. At least two great 
non-Protestant religions claim that in 
a few years they will control this 
country educationally and religiously. 
Heathen temples are being erected 
here. Nothing but the gospel of Christ 
is sufficient to save our nation. To 
us is entrusted that far-reaching but 
difficult work of making our own a 
Christian nation, strong enough to 
bear its full share In the world task. 

To the Woman's Missionary Council 
whom God has entrusted with a large 
part of the work of Christian educa- 
tion in the East, in the Latin lands, 
and among the mountain, foreign-born 
and black people here, with medical 
and evangelistic work among thou- 
sands of suffering and misguided peo- 
ple, with a large shart in the redemp- 
tion of the cities and the uplift of the 
fallen, comes a call for enlargement 
along all lines. Failure to send out 
more workers, to enlarge our insti- 
tutions, to equip them for better work 
is a refusal to use for Him the power 
He has given us to do this work. 

We are stewards of a gospel that 
lias power to save every race and 
nation. We are more; we are part- 
ners with God in a big business that 
requires haste. We are helping to 
build a kingdom. 

Our investment of money in the 
King's business hag been shamefully 
small. Reports from Our institutions 
showing how much larger the work 
might be; reports from overburdened 
workers; with their plea for help; 
the cry from those yet unreached; 
the needs of unoccupied territory; re- 
ports of treasurers of missionary so- 
cieties and of the churches — all tell 
a story of narrow vision and selfish- 
ness. The pitiful tenth of the in- 
come of our poor Southern Methodist 
folks is nearly four times what we 
are giving for all religious purposes. 
We have been negligent, slothful, self- 
ish stewards. Let us begin now to 
do better. — Leaflet. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, our Heavenly Father, in 
His infinite wisdom, has seen fit to 
remove from our midst our friend 
and co-worker, Mrs. Bertha King Bas- 
sett, be it resolved, therefore, that we 
offer the following resolutions as an 
expression of our love and esteem: 

First, that we, the members of the 
Woman's Missionary Society of Cen- 
tral church, Asheville, N. C, bow in 
humble submission to God's will, real- 
izing that He is "too wise to err." 

Second, that the faithfulness and 
constancy of her life be commended 
as an example worthy of emulation. 

Third, that we are saddened at her 
death, and pray that when the sum- 
mons comes to each one of us, we, 
too, may meet it with an unfaltering 
courage as she did. 

Fourth, that we extend to the be- 
reaved relatives our tenderest sym- 
pathy, and commend them to Him 
who is able to heal the broken heart- 
ed. 



Fifth, that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the family, a copy be 
placed on record as a memorial to her, 
and a copy be furnished our mission- 
ary page in the North Carolina Chris- 
tian Advocate. 

Mrs. J. T. Sevier, 
Mrs. W. R. Harris, 
Committee. 



NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS 

At the close of the year a great 
many men and women review the 
events and experiences through which 
they have passed, and resolve to prof- 
it by them during the coming year. 
Many a man "turns over a new lear" 
and many a woman emphatically de- 
clares that she will abandon this fol- 
ly and that. So many fail in their 
resolves that New Year's resolutions 
have become a subject of jest. 

Yet while there may be a humor- 
ous phase of the subject, there is 
certainly a more serious one than 
many appear to believe. It makes no 
difference whether it is New Year's 
eve, or any other eve, there has to 
come a time in the lives of all when 
there is an accounting with self. It 
is only through such accountings that 
men and women find themselves, learn 
to know themselves, and knowing, 
become what they should be. 

Rev. Dr. Talmage used to tell the 
story of a young man who annually 
devoted New Year's eve to a review 
of the year ended, concluding with 
resolutions which he seldom kept for 
any length of time. Lying lazily back 
in a comfortable Morris chair, this 
young man would smoke a cigar, 
think over the year and make his re- 
solves. One New Year's eve he 
thought and smoked until half dream- 
ing, he fancied he saw in the smoke 
as it curled upward the word "Reso- 
lutions." His fancy led him to a se- 
rious consideration of how many of 
his resolutions had really gone up 
in smoke. He was astounded and 
made one supreme resolve that they 
should no longer end in smoke. 

Each time he told this story, Dr. 
Talmage assured his hearers that this 
young man was today one of the fore- 
most business men of New York City, 
a factor in its commercial life, and 
a powerful agent for good in many 
directions. The revered gentleman 
made the point that although resolu- 
tions may be made only to be broken, 
the time must come in the life of 
every man and woman when they 
make one supreme resolve that is the 
making of themselves. Therefore, Dr. 
Talmage always declared that he 
favored New Year's resolutions even 
though they would be broken, because 
he knew that in the end they would 
result in something really worth 
while. — Selected. 



Claude Robeson 

ORGAN RECITALS 

New Organs Opened 

Teacher of Organ, Greensboro College 
for Women; Organist and Choirmaster 
West Market St. M. B. Church, Organist 
and Director Temple Emanuel. Address 

Greensboro College, Greensboro, N. C. 



Paint Without Oil 

Remarkable Discovery That Cuts 
Down the Cost of Paint Sev- 
enty-Five Per Cent. 

A Free Trial Package Is Mailed to Every- 
one Who Writes 

A. L. Rice, a prominent manufacturer 
of Adams, N. T., has discovered a process 
of making a new kind of paint without 
the use of oil. He calls is Powdrpaint. 
t comes In the form of a dry powder and 
all that Is required is cold water to make 
a paint weather proof, fire proof and as 
durable as oil paint. It adheres to any 
surface, wood, stone or brick, spreads and 
looks like oil paint and costs about one- 
fourth as much. 

Write to Mr. A. L. Rice, Mfgr., 144 
North Street, Adams, N. Y., and he will 
send you a free trial package, also a color 
card and full information, showing you 
how you can save a good many dollars. 
Write today. 



January 15, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Epworth League Department 

Conducted by Miu A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. C. 



RACE STREET JUNIOR LEAGUE 

The Race Street Junior League, of 
Statesville, held its regular business 
meeting on Monday afternoon, Decem- 
ber 15th, with twenty-five members 
and all the officers except one pres- 
ent. Five new members were received 
which brings the membership up to 
forty-eight. 



We want to thank Mrs. Poston, the 
Junior Superintendent, for this re- 
port, and say that we are sorry it has 
been delayed so long. The Christmas 
number and the fact that one week 
the paper was not issued accounts for 
the delay. We hope that before the 
New Year they secured two more new 
members, making a membership of 
fifty. They indeed have a good 
League. Who can beat them? 



CHRISTMAS SERVICE AT THE 
NEWTON LEAGUE 

On Tuesday night before Christmas 
the League meeting was made a 
Christmas service. The following pro- 
gram was given: 

Hymn — "While Shepherds Watched j 
Their Flocks By Night." | 

Scripture Lesson — Second chapter j 
of Luke — The first twelve years of 
Jesus' life. 

Prayer — by pastor. 

Hymn — "Joy to the World, The Lord 
Is Come." 

Paper on Christmas — by Miss Mary 
White. 

Poem, "The Little Gray Lamb," — 
read by Miss Olive Duke. 

Hymn — "Hark, the Herald Angels 
Sing." 

Paper — by Miss Dorothy Erwin. 
Poem — read by Miss Rebechah Trol- 
lin^'er. 

Short talk by the pastor. 

Hymn — "All Hail the Power of Je- 
sus' Name." 

League Benediction. 

The attendance was small owing to 
the nearness of Christmas and the 
fact that everybody was so busy, but 
all who were there went away feeling 
that they had received some good out 
of the meeting, even if they had to 
work a little later to get their Christ- 
mas work done. 



MORE INTELLIGENT PRAYER LIFE 

The following poem, written for the 
Missionary Voice by James Riddick 
Laughton, indicates a dawning re- 
sponse of the Church to the great 
challenge to prayer: 

A Prayee 
Give me, O Heavenly Father, 

Thy holy will to know; 
I wish no other measure 

Of happiness below. 
Grant me the faith to trust thee, 

Though friends and fortune cease; 
Through all life's toilsome journey, 

Grant me thine own sweet peace. 

Help me to fill each moment 

With deeds of Christly love, 
To flood each place of darkness 

With sunlight from above; 
To lift some fallen comrade, 

Some aching heart to cheer, 
To tell some sin-stained wanderer 

That God and heaven are near. 

Help me, O great World-Father, 

My brother's need to bear, 
To feel upon my heartstrings 

The pressure of his care; 
To free my soul from bondage 

Of race or tribe or clan; 
To help bring in the kingdom 

Of Christ the Son of Man. 



"So *each us to number our days 
that we may apply our hearts unto 
wisdom." 

How many of us as we repeat our 
League Benediction week after week 
ever stop to think what it really 



means and from what part of the Bi- 
ble it is taken? Very few, we fear. 
The full meaning of that verse was 
brought to our heart on Sunday af- 
ternoon, January 4th, as we sat in the 
First Methodist Church, Hickory, dur- 
ing the funeral services of one of our 
most promising young men, Terry 
Shell. No doubt all of you have read 
of the sad death of this young man. 
On Christmas day he spent most of 
his time with the other members of 
his Baraca class distributing gifts to 
the poor and needy of our town, and 
on going home that night said that 
it had been the happiest Christmas of 
his life. The night that he received 
the fatal shot, he had been with a 
crowd of young people to the church, 
singing songs and ringing the old year 
out and the new year in. After leav- 
ing the church he stopped up town 
where a crowd of men and boys had 
gathered to "celebrate." They had 
guns and pistols and became care- 
less. O, if the people would only 
learn to celebrate our holidays in a 
more appropriate manner! How 
many deaths have been caused by "cel- 
ebrating!" This is a great opportu- 
nity for the Young Leaguers of Amer- 
ica. If the young people would decide 
to be sane in their celebrating, it 
would not be long until all this shoot- 
ing and carousing would be a thing 
of the past. How much more our 
holidays would mean to us if we 
would celebrate them in doing good 
deeds and helping others, and think- 
ing of the significance of the occasion, 
instead of trying to see how much 
damage we can do and how much noise 
we can make. Let the Leaguers think 
seriously over this and then turn 
their influence toward having sane cel- 
ebrations. 

Little did this young man think 
when he left the church that he would 
never enter it again in this life. None 
of us ever know when we may be 
called to leave this world, and we 
should be sure that our hearts are 
ready should we be called at any min- 
ute. May we each make our League 
benediction our heart prayer, and may 
we say with earnestness and sincerity, 
"So teach us to number our days that 
we may apply our hearts unto wis- 
dom." 



BIRDS IN TROUBLE 
A pair of yellowhammers out in 
the orchard were in great trouble one 
day. They had worked hard all the 
spring digging out a hole in an old 
apple tree. When they thought it 
was deep enough, they built a nest 
at the very bottom of it, and soon 
four little eggs were laid there; and 
in a couple of weeks four little birds 
were piping away for worms and bugs 
and all kinds of breakfast food. 

But this day I am telling you about 
the big birds darted back and forth, 
screaming for help. Some one brought 
a ladder, and there was a snake that 
had climbed the tree and found the 
opening and was trying to eat up all 
the little birds. A crooked stick pull- 
ed him out of the hole quicker than 
he went in, and two of the little birds 
were saved and grew up to Duild nests 
of their own with little birds in them. 
I think they must have often told 
the story of the kind man who came 
to the rescue when he heard their 
father and mother calling. — The May- 
flower. 



Chinese Hear the Gospel 

The attendance at the Sunday morn- 
ing services in Sungkiang is so large 
that the church will not hold the peo- 
ple, and our imperative need is for a 
larger and more modern ouilding, 
where we can properly provide class 
rooms for the l?.rge Sunday school 
attendance. When the training school 



Add To Your Crops 



By the use of the Bemis 
Transplanter. 

DO IT RIGHT THIS YEAR 




Set out your plants with the Fuller 
& Johnson Bemis Transplanter and see 
them start growing quicker and bring 
you larger money returns because of bet- 
ter quality and larger yield. 

When you thrust a stake into the 
ground and set the tender plant into the hole thereby formed you cramp and double up 
the roots and force them to make their way through a hard wall of earth. If they do it 
and get hold they live. If they do not, you are the loser when they die. 

Besides, it is slow, backbreaking work, never well done by help and too trying for 

you. 

The Fuller & Johnson Bemis Transplanter obviates all this. It sets the plant into 
the ground, packs the loose earth around the stem of the plant properly, gives a supply 
of water right at the roots, slushing and spreading them out. then covers the roots with 
the loose fine earth, so that the ground does not bake and the plant does not burn. 
Result is, plants start quicker. 

More Plants Grow when set by this Machine than 
when set by hand and you get a better quality crop 

Actual tests show that ninety-five per cent, of the plants grow. They can be setout 
in any kind of weather. Think of the advantage of this. 

Then the labor saved is fully two-thirds. So, with the Bemis Transplanter you get 

Better Crops at Less Money. More Tobacco 
with Less Work. 

The machine is built on the "Quality First" idea. Many of the Fuller & Johnson 
Bemis Transplanters sold twenty-five years ago are yet in use. Fully seventy-five per 
cent, of the Transplanters now in use in America are of this make. 

This Transplanter is strongly, carefully and durably built and of the best materials 
obtainable. 

It will last a lifetime and make its cost the first year. 

Write to the Madison Plow Co.. Manufacturers, Madison, Wisconsin, for descriptive 
matter, or see any of the following agents, who sell and warrantlhe Fuller & Johnson 
Bemis Transplanter: 

H E. Brewer & Co., Rocky Mouot/.N. C. 



L. Harvey & Sods Co., Kinston, N . C. 
Hlnnant-Rlersoh Co., Wilson, N. C. 
E. C. MoLamb, Keener, N. C. 
Stevens F.& I- Co., Smlthfield N. 
R. II Elmore, Melfa, Va. 

Dl^on Brothers Mercantile Co., Snow Hill. N. C. 
Hallivood Feed & Snpply Co., Ilalhrood, Va. 



Hart * Hartley. Greenville, N.C. 

E. R. Johnson, Currituck 0. II., N. O. 

Smith Hardware Co., Goldshoro, N. C. 
J. S. Woolen. La Grange, N. C. 
Martin Hall, Oak Hall, Va. 
J. T. Edfei ton 4 Brother, Kenly, N. 0. 
Geo. M. Holier, Coleralne, \ . C. 



for young preachers opens at Sung- 
kiang the beginning of the year I do 
not know how we will accomodate the 
congregation. — J. A. C. Shipley, Shang- 
hai, China. 



Praying for More Preachers 

The month of May in the Shanghai 
District was observed as a special day 
of prayer that more of our young 
men would dedicate their lives to the 
ministry of the gospel, and our preach- 
ers at all points were urged to preach 
on that mportant subject. We expect 
our prayers to be answered, and yet 
at times we are almost afraid to pray, 
for fear that when the men offer the 
funds will not be on hand. May you 
who hold the purse strings in the home 
land discharge faithfully the trustee- 
ship which God has granted to you, 
and liberally give to the objects so 
thoroughly apporved by the Board of 
Missions. — J. A. G. Shipley, Shanghai, 
China. 



Most of our mistakes come from 
living for the minute instead of for 
eternity. — 'Selected. 



A SPLENDID USE FOR A SLED 

The minister came along and saw 
Robbie dragging another boy over the 
ice on his sled. It was Sunday, and 
the minister didn't understand how 
Robbie could go coasting and go to 
Sunday school at the same time. So 
he spoke about it, for Robbie was one 
of his boys. The other one wasn't 
— not till that morning. 

"O, yes!" said Robbie; "he's a-com- 
ing. You see, his foot's lame, so I'm 
bringing him." 

"O, I see!" said the minister. "It's 
a Sunday sled, isn't it?" — The May- 
flower. 



EVERY WOMAN 



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EARN 



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ing whether you get just ordi- 
nary nursery stock or whether 
you get 

Trees That Produce Results 

Nobody has any question as lo what 
kind he will get when he orders of the 
J. Van Lindley Nursery Company, box 
203, Pomona, N. C. A forty-year record 
of satisfaction to purchasers is the best 
criterion to go by. This house not only 
wills to do the right thing, but knows 
how to do the thing right. 

A postal card will bring you their new 
book, containing much on tree culture. 



Introducing our very complete Spring line of b eautiful 
wool suitings, wash fabrics, fancy walstings, silks, hdkfs. 
pettlcoa ts, etc. Uptodate N. Y. City patterns. Finest 
line on t he market. Dealing direct with the mill > you 
will find our prices low. If others can make $10 to $30 
weekly you can also. Samples, ful linstructionsi n neat 
sample case, shipped express prepaid. No money re- 
quired. Exclusive territory. Write for particulars. Be 
first to apply. 

Standard Dress Goods Company, 32'lst St. Blnghamton, N. T. 



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Our free catalog 
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CINCINNATI, o 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 15, 1914 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by Walter Thompson, Snpeiintendeat 



The brethren are beginning to send 
In part of the ten per cent. This is 
very gratifying to the management 
of the Home. A little money on hand 
not only prevents the possible pay- 
ing of interest on money borrowed to 
pay current expenses, but it enables 
us to take advantage of the market 
and lay in supplies when they reach 
their lowest price. 



The Oak Ridge Institute Sunday 
school has a practice of donating at 
the end of each year whatever amount 
is left in their treasury to some or- 
phanage in the State. This year it 
came to us and is acknowledged with 
many thanks. The amount is $16.77. 



The health of the children has been 
good through the winter thus far. We 
are having some colds just now, but 
happily nothing serious. 



RECEIVED ON FIFTH SUNDAY COL- 
LECTIONS WEEK ENDING JAN. 
10, 1914 

H. C. Jones, South Side, Winston, 
$1.15; H. C. Jones, Salem, Winston, 
$1.15; W. S. Hates, Mt. Pleasant S, 
S v Gibson ville, 80c; W. S. Somers, 
Salem S. S., Wentworth, $1.20; W. H. 
Rees, W. Market St., Greensboro, 
$11.06; T. W. Fox, New Salem S. S., 
Cool Spring, $1.55; W. T. Allbright, 
Rocky Ridge S. S., Concord, $2.53. To- 
tal, $20.24. 



RECEIVED ON TEN PER CENT., 
GENERAL AND SPECIAL SUP- 
PORT, WEEK ENDING JAN. 
10, 1914 

Rev. W. T. Allbright, Concord Ct., 
Rocky Ridge, $3.67; Carmel, $2.62; Bo- 
gers, $2.89; Olivet, $9.00 ($18.18); 
Rev. W. S. Hales, Gibsonville Ct., $6.00; 
H. C. Jones, S. Side and Salem, $1- 
.00; Rev. T. J. Houck, Sparta Ct, $5.- 
00, Piney Creek church; Miss Pattie 
Beckham, Hiddenite church, Alexan- 
der Ct, $2.50; Jas. C. Fink, Forest 
Hill, Concord, $15.00; M. D. Stockton, 
Special Support, $25.00; J. W. Fletcher, 
Centenary Baraca class, Special Sup., 
$25.00; E. E. Ward, Mt. Pleasant 
church, Christmas gift, $3.65; Dorsey 
L. Nance, Oak Ridge Institute S. S., 
$16.77; Rev. A. L. Aycock, Baraca and 
Philathea classes, Leaksville, Christ- 
mas gift, $12.64; a friend, Bostic, $10.- 
00; Mrs. E. J. Coletrane, W. M. S., 
Jamestown, 35c (donation in box); C. 
C. Little, New Year's gift, $5.90; Har- 
old Turner, Concord, Central, Christ- 
mas gift, $4.65. Total, $151.64. 



PAID ON BUILDING FUND, J. H. 
WEST, AGENT 

Paid On Subscriptions: — Mocksville: 
Z. N. Anderson, Mocksville S. S., $32.- 
44. Spencer: Mrs. W. C. Gatewood, 
$12.50. Salisbury: C. S. Morris and 
W. T. Burke, $2.00. Asheville: S. P. 
Burton, $25.00. Weaverville: Rev. W. 
A. Newell, $10.00. Total, $81.94. 

Paid on New Subscriptions: — J. M. 
MsMinn, $1.00; paid on dividend of 
ten shares of stock in Shelby National 
Bank for Vernia Lee Library, $50.00. 
Grand Total, $132.94. 



DONATIONS 

Mrs. C. E. Hayes, class, Brevard St., 
Charlotte, 19 handkerchiefs; Mrs. D. 
B. Aldrich, hood and muffler. 



THE NEW LIFE 

~t \3 " ' **' 
This new life — the life that has con- 
quered death by tasting it, which has 
enriched itself with a before unknown 
sympathy with men whose lives are 
forever tending towards the grave — 
this life stretches on and out forever. 
It is to know no ending. So long as 
e are men living and dying, so 



long above them and around them 
there shall be the Christ, the God-man, 
who liveth, and was dead and is alive 
evermore. 

As you sit thinking of man's frag- 
mentariness, his certainty of death, his 
doubt about a future, let "this voice 
come to you, a voice clear with per- 
sonality, and sweet and strong with 
love: "I am He that liveth and was 
dead; and am alive for evermore." "He 
that liveth!" An dat once your frag- 
ment of life falls into its place in the 
eternity of life that is bridged by his 
being. "He that was dead!" and at 
once death changes from the terrible 
end of life into a most mysterious, 
but no longer terrible, experience of 
life. "He that is alive for evermore-" 
And not merely that there is a future 
beyond the grave, but it is inhabited 
by one who speaks to us, who went 
thereby the way that we must go] and 
who sees us and can help us as we 
make our way along, and will receive 
Brooks. us when we come there. — Phil 
lips Brooks. 



TAKE NO RISK 

When you pay five dollars for a 
pair of shoes and they go to pieces 
within two weeks you naturally ex 
pect the Shoe Merchant to refund 
your money or give you a new and 
perfect pair. But if you buy a guar- 
anteed piano or player-piano and it 
goes bad in five or ten years, as at 
least half of them do, have you any 
assurance that the dealer from whom 
you buy will be alive or in business 
at that time? 

That is why we selected the oldest 
and one of the largest piano houses 
in the South to conduit the North 
Carolina Christian Advocate Piano 
Club. We wanted a guarantee that 
would not die, from a House that 
would not move away ^Qr go out of 
business. We have thus permanently 
secured Club members against all de- 
fects in workmanship and material 
and if your piano should ever go bad 
you will have an old and reliable 
House to make it good or give you a 
new one. 

It is an easy matter for a temporary 
dealer to guarantee any piano, no mat- 
ter how bad it may be; but when a 
House intends to remain in business 
permanently at the same old stand it 
must put the quality into your instru- 
ment so that it will last indefinitely. 
For nearly half a century that has 
been the policy of the House which 
we have selected to conduct the North 
Carolina Christian Advocate Piano 
Club. 

But that is only one of the many at- 
tractive and economical features of 
the Club. Write for your copy M the 
illustrated catalogue and get full par- 
ticulars of the big saving in price, the 
convenient terms, the binding guaran- 
tees, etc., etc. Address the Managers, 
Ludden & Bates, North Carolina Chris- 
tian Advocate Piano Club Dept., At- 
lanta, Ga. 



SUSPENDED JUDGMENT 

"I try more and more every year to 
hold judgment of others in suspense 
till I can know all the facts at first 
hand," said one who was accused of 
being too lenient towards offenders. 
Certainly I am not qualified to judge 
till then God's Commandments is 
'Judge not!' " Suspended judgment 
is the best kind of judgment. It is so 
impossible to know all, the circum- 
stances and impulses that lead another 
to do certain things we condemn, that 
our judgment can never be altogether 
just! As we know instinctively, and 
often protestingly, that others can not 
judge us rightly, let us try to remem- 
ber that we are not qualified to pass 
judgment upon others. — The Well- 
spring. 



The Romance of the Butterfat 



From the time of the Pharaohs of 
the Exodus until now the setting of 
cream to rise and permitting It to sour 
has been the way of most people who 
sought to make butter. This butter 
has been of all kinds; from the sour 
and pale product of the hill tribes 
of India to the golden rolls of the 
Isle of Jersey. But the method has 
been just about the same, and butter 
has been made for centuries by set- 
ting milk to let it sour and let the 
cream rise. Careful measurements by 
the modern experiment stations have 
shown that a large proportion of the 
tiny golden globules of butter fat 
escape into the buttermilk and are 
wasted, for they do not aid in giving 
the delicious flavor of buttermilk, nor 
are they of much value as a food if 
fed to calves and pigs. 

It is only in comparatively recent 
times that means have been found to 
separate the fat contained in milk, 
while the milk is fresh and pure, from 
the body of the fluid itself, thus get- 
ting the richest kind of cream and 
leaving the skim milk clean and sweet. 
This has of late years been done by 
a device called a tubular separator, 
which through rapidly revolving cham- 
bers forces the cream globules, usu- 
ally called butterfat, out of the milk, 
leaving the latter rich in all the bone 
making and muscle forming food, but 
free of the heat developing particles 
that go into butter. This separating 
process has been so carefully devel- 
oped that it actually gets thirty-three 
per cent, more butter from milk than 
is possible by the old "setting" and 
"skimming" of gravity process. For 
every three pounds of butter obtained 
by the old fashioned methods the man 
with a tubular separator can get four. 
Since butter averages about thirty 
cents a pound, that means that where 
he now has ninety cents he might as 
well have $1.20. 

But that is not the only financial 
advantage of a tubular separator, be- 
cause it has been found by the same 
scientific investigators that the skim 
milk obtained from the sweet milk is 
a most remarkable food for calves 
and pigs. It is the natural food for 
the calves, minus only the parts that 
make the heat they need to keep lit- 
tle bodies warm, and butter is a high 
priced fuel even for young calves. 
Indeed, it has been found that the 
feeding of a little cottonseed oil not 
only supplies the heat-making elements 
necessary; but gives a greater and 
better supply of them to calves and 
pigs than is the case if they are fed 
pure, rich milk from the cows direct. 
In other words a calf will thrive and 
grow faster and better on the "balanced 
ration" of skim milk and cottonseed oil 
than on its mother's milk undiluted. 

Then, too, it has been found that 
the skim milk, when allowed to "ri- 
pen" under proper care, furnishes the 
most tasty kind of buttermilk, with 
the healthgiving qualities of the fin- 
est lactic acid drinks, that scientists 
recommend for the prolongation of 
life, and that this buttermilk is ac- 
tually better and purer for the sepa- 
ration from the cream while it is yet 
fresh than it is after the "ripening" 
or souring process has taken place. 
This is because the "ripening" or sour- 
ing is produced by the growth of mil- 
lions of bacteria in the milk, and the 
bacteria thus produced must be of the 
right kind, or the cream and the but- 
termilk both take on a bitter taste. 
This is avoided by separating them 
mechanically and "ripening" them un- 
der control, that is, in closed recep- 
tacles that may be handled freely with- 
out fear of contamination, which can- 



not be done when cream is expected to 
rise in open pans. 

These tubular separators have done 
so much more that the story reads 
like a romance. They have made the 
former laborious work of "skimming" 
the cream unnecessary; they have 
made churning a scientific process, so 
that the housewife who uses a tubular 
separator is sure of better butter, it 
never having had a chance to become 
bitter, and of firmer butter, because 
the whey and watery product of sour 
milk are eliminated, and they have 
made dairying so profitable that the 
cows upon the farms of the middle 
west have made those states the rich- 
est in the world. 

Yet it is not alone in the increased 
amount of butter fat developed that 
the scientific means of dairying have 
so greatly increased the income of 
farmers. The further item of taking 
the milk from the cow as soon as it 
is fit for human consumption, sep- 
arating the butterfat from it and feed- 
ing the calf the skim milk has re- 
sulted in a saving of one-fourth of the 
original milk yield in itself, without 
injury to the calf. Add to the orig- 
inal milk yield the fourth that has 
heretofore been considered the calf's 
portion, and then gain a third more 
butter from the entire yield, and you- 
will have more than half as much 
more from the cow. Marvelous as 
this is, it is not the only yield, for 
the retention upon the farm of the 
fertilizer is worth all that it costs 
to keep the cow, and is really con- 
sidered to be over ten per cent of the 
total yield of the cow. Then the but- 
terfat and the skim milk are money 
crops, so that the farmer who is a 
successful dairyman can get money 
each week for his crop, if he is so 
disposed. Now look at the arithme- 
tical side of it. First add a quarter 
more of the product by saving the 
milk heretofore fea to the calves. 
This is one dollar in five. Then ex- 
tract a third more butter fat from 
that than you have been getting by 
the gravity method, which will give 
you one dollar more in every three you 
had before, plus one dollar more in ev- 
ery five you had in quantity, and you 
may add to that one dollalr more in ev- 
ery ten you get for increased facility 
in the land. Guess that ought to open 
the eyes of the average farmer to the 
benefits of dairying. 

There is no reason why this same 
thing should not be done in the South 
as well. The people of the South are 
beginning to give dairying the atten- 
tion it deserves, and with this atten- 
tion they are learning something of 
separators and other devices that have 
made it so profitable. Of course they 
must pay for this learning, and it is 
in this particular that they need the 
most guidance just now. There are 
separators and separators, but the best, 
because it does the most work and 
recovers the largest amount of butter 
fat in return for the least amount of 
energy expended, is the tubular sepa- 
rator, a wonderful invention that has 
stood the test of time and experience, 
and that is needed in every home 
where butter is made and in every 
dairy where butter is sold, because it 
is the most effective. If you are not 
familiar with its unusual merits write 
to P. T. Sharpies, West Chester, Pa., 
tell him you saw this little story of 
the tubular separator in the North 
Carolina Christian Advocate and ask 
him to send you more information 
about it. He will be glad to forward 
this to any inquiring reader, for his 
interest is greater in successful dairy- 
ing than it is in any other enterprise. 




ATLANTA. GEORGIA 

Thorough courses, capable teachers and cour- 
teous treatment for a quarter of a century have 
placed DRAUGHON'S far in the leaZ Gel 
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prosperity. Write for catalogue "P" 



HOLLER, ROBINS & WEILL 

General Insurance 

General Agents Fidelity and Deposit 

Company of Maryland 
108 North Elm S treat 'Phoae 44 



January 15, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



This World-Renowned Work 
Published in Smaller 
and More Volumes 



Was m 



Bound Complete in Seven 
Big Volumes Including 
Index Volume 



Now HO 



The grandest library of Bible Knowledge and Teaching in existence at the most sweeping reduction ever made on a work of similar value. 
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We Save You $39.00, And 
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BUT YOU MUST ACT QUICKLY 

SITION OF THE BIBLE 



"By far the best commentary on Genesis "—The Churchman, 
New York. 

"Full of spiritual truth and instruction."— Christian Work. 
•'Young ministers will find it a mine of treasure."— New York 
Evangelist. 

"Unusually fresh and brig-ht."— Presbyterian and Reformed 
Review. 

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"The preacher who cannot derive very material assistance 
from these volumes must be a difficult person to help."— The 
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"It easily takes its place in the front rank of works which 
have for their object the understanding 1 of the Bible and the 
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and Its carrying out by foremost preachers and 1 "t4 eo '°8' ans 
secures scientific and scholarly thoroughness along 'with pop- 
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"The series is proving that the exposition of the Scriptures p : : : |i 
need be neither dry nor wearisome, and preachers will do well EDIU1HIH 
to study these volumes, as examples of expository style and 
method."— The Watchman. 



FOR THE PREACHER 

it affords endless material to enrich his sermons, 
both in history, criticisms, and exposition. 

FOR THE TEACHER 

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communicating Scriptural knowledge or answering 
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it spreads a matchless f east of instruction and 
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This great work consists of seven large volumes solidly packed with thousands of the most practical and valuable helps for the preacher, 
teacher and Bible student. Unlike the ordinary commentary with its details and technicality this vast library of Bible helps actually ej- , 
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Twenty-seven of the World's Most Eminent Biblical Scholars 



Distinguished Authors and their Contributions:— §^&Sa^£EffilM8gB 

D. D. Leviticus, S. H. Kellogg, D. D. Numbers, Judges, Ruth. 'Job, R. A. Watson, D. D. Deuteronomy, Andrew Harper, D. D. Joshua, 
First and Second Samuel, W. G. Blaikie, D. D;, LL.D. First and Second Kings, Daniel, Dean F.W. Farrar, D.D. First and Second Chroni- 
cles, W. H. Bennett, M. A. Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Song of Sftlomon, Lamentations, W. F. Adbney, M. A. Psalms, Colossians, Philemon, 
Alexander Maclaren, D. D. Proverbs, R. F. Horton, D. D. 'Ecclesiastes, Samdel Cox, D.D. Isaiah, Twelve Minor Prophets, George 
Adam Smith, D. D., LL. D. Jeremiah, C. J. Ball, M. A. ^Beeklel, John Skinner, M. A. St. Matthew, J. Munro Gibson. D. D. St. Luke. 
Henry Burton, M. A. Acts of the Apostles, G. T. Stokes, D. D. Romans, H. C. G. Mocle. D. D. Second Corinthians, Thessalonians, 
James Denney, D. D. Galatians, Ephesians, E. G. Findlay, D. D. Philippians, Robert Rainey, D. D. First and Second Timothy, Titus. 
James, Jude, A. Plummer, D.D.Hebrews, C. T. Edwards, D. D. First and Second Peter, J. R. Lomby, D. D. First, Second and Third 
John, W. Alexander D. D. Revelation, W. Milligan, D. D. k i 

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book of the Bible the rich, fertile, and perpetually significant portions are selected, and continuously analyzed, illustrated and explained by Interpreters who 

are scholarly yet interestina."~British Weekly. 

Wf\\AI 7Tf\ ARHPR On the Monthly Payment Plan we require $2 with order, and your promise to pay $1 monthly for ten months. Books forwarded 
"■www I \M Vltllbll on receipt of cash price or first installment of $2. Customers pay freight or express charges. Those at remote points or in 
foreig n countries desiring us to prepay will send 30 cents per volume to cover cost of postage or express. Safe delivery guaranteed to any station In the country or 
to any mail point In the world. We will take back books that are not satisfactory if returned within ten days and refund money, deducting only the return 
transportation charges. 

As to our reliability, we refer you to the publishers of this 
paper, or to any commercial agency. Established 1866. 

S. S. SCRANTON CO., 118 Trumbull Street, Hartford, Conn. 



A LIFE ANNUITY BOND 
I. What It Is and Does 

A Life Annuity Bond is an Insur- 
ance Policy "turned 'round!" In life 
insurance you pay an uncertain num- 
ber of small amounts, and one large 
amount is paid at death. 

In a LIFE ANNUITY BOND you 
pay a large amount at once, and re- 
ceive a number of small amounts an- 
nually, semi-annually, quarterly or 
monthly, until death. 

A person who must have an absolute 
sure, fixed income until the last day 
of life, or who desires to make a be- 
nevolent distribution of his property 
without litigation, expense or fail- 
ure, should have a LIFE ANNUITY 
BOND. The money is at once care- 
fully and safely loaned on first-class 
security by the Board of Church Exten- 
sion, and the holder of the Bond re- 
ceives regular, fixed and assured pay- 
ments during life'. 

A LIFE ANNUITY BOND pays a 
higher rate than the current interest 
rate, because the claim of a Life Annu- 
ity Bond terminates with the death 
of the annuitant, and a conservative 
and economical management of the 
business without commissions or 
heavy expense and without taxation 
makes it possible. 

The rate paid on a LIFE ANNUITY 
BOND is determined by the age of the 
annuitant — the older the person the 
higher the rate. No medical examina- 
tion is necessary. 

LIFE ANNUITY BONDS may be 
purchased for any amount, and upon 
the life of one or more individuals, 
or for one or more beneficiaries des- 
ignated by the purchaser. 

LIFE ANNUITY BONDS are not ex- 
perimental. They date back to the 
days of the Roman Empire. The Eng- 
lish Government and. other nations 
have issued such Bonds for more than 
a century. 

Had the Southern Methodist part 
of the $120,000,000 paid to Life Insur- 
ance Companies for Life Annuities 
since 1890 been invested in the LIFE 
ANNUITY BONDS of the Board of 
Church Extension of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, those mil- 
lions would be today and forever 
building churches and parsonages, and 
a life income would have been given 
to the purchasers. 

LIFE ANNUITY BONDS are safe, 
for back of them is the Board of 
Church Extension, a splendidly equipp- 
ed department of the Church with its 
invested resources which at the pres- 
ent time are fifty times the amount 
of bond liability, with investments 
increasing daily. Back of the Board 
is the General Conference which au- 
thorized it, and the State of Ken- 
tucky which incorporated it. Back of 
them is the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, with its two millions 
of members, and with that habit of 
financial responsibility and intelligent 
co-operation which has made its great 
hoards and business enterprises the 
admiration of many, and has given 
to them the very highest commercial 
rating. 

II. What Our Annuitants Think 
Of Them 

" Texas, 

November 6, 1913. 
Dr. W. F. McMurry, 

Louisville, Ky. 
Dear Brother: 

I received the check the 3rd inst. 
Please accept my sincere thanks for 
your help in arranging this business 
so satisfactorily to me. It is indeed 
restful to know that I need not be 
anxious about how or what to do. Wish 
I had known of this plan sooner. 

With prayers and best wishes for 
your health and that of your family, 
and success in your great work for 
the extension of our Father's Kingdom. 
Your sincere friend and sister, 
(Signed) 



*i 

" -....Md., July 18, 1912: 

Rev. W. F. McMurry, 
Dear Sir: — 

I am glad to have an opportunity 
to write a word to you on two 
"Counts," one of which is thanks for 
"filthy lucre" (it is anything but that 
to me now, Dr.), and the other for 
the always acceptable literature which 
I received some weeks ago. In the 
midst of all your duties you have 
time to remember me. A few days 
ago I also received a pretty, bright 
copy of the new Hand Book of Church 
Extension in its usual cheering, com- 
prehensive style. We are little, but 
snot unknown. 

With all good wishes and kind re- 
gards, Very truly yours," 
(Signed) 

. , x A v., . . . . ; Ala., • 

Dec. 22, 1913. 
Dr. W. F. 'McMurry, 
Dear Brother:— 

Thanks for your promptness in send- 
ing interest due January 1, 1914. I 



have been declining in health since 
October 3rd. May not be here to 
acknowledge receipts for drafts due 

July 1st. My sister , will 

write if I cannot. I must say I have 
had great satisfaction in my dealings 
with Church Extension as regards 
Annuities. Pray that I may be faith- 
ful to the end of life's journey, so 
I may have a happy greeting from 
my heavenly Father that I have tried 
to serve many years. 

Sincerely yours in Christ," 
(Si'gneSt ■■ 

If you wish further information as 
to such Bohds, write to the Corre- 
sponding Secretary of the Board of 
Church Extension of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. South, Rev. W. F. 
MeMurry, D. D„ 1025 Brook St., Lcufs 
ville, Ky. 

" '■ ■■ - ' fc J ■ 

.. : " ' G I ;t}'t!(< to 

There is onlsr.one real failure in life 
possible, and that is not to be true 
to the best one knows. — Canon Far- 



i ' ■■' ■ - . ■ .■ >.'.• 

During revival meetings in a Wea>, 
tern city placards giving notices of; 
the various meetings, subjects, etc, 
were posted in conspicuous places. < 
One day the following was displayed:,- 

Subject — "Hell: Its Location and its 
Absolute Certainty." 

Thomas Jones, barytone, will sing: j 
"Tell Mother I'll Be There."— Ladies' 
Home Journal. 



IMS SPACE BELONGS TO 

ROOT. W. MURRAY 

GENERAL 

Insurance 

Greensboro, North C *To!in» 

308 1-2 South Elm St. 

Pfaoaa 133 



Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 15, 1914 



The Sunday School j 
Lesson 



FIRST QUARTER— LESSON III— 
JANUATY 18, 1914 



The Good Samaritan. Luke 10:25-37 



Goi-dun Text — Thou shale love thy 
neighbor as thyself. Mark 12:31. 



The Interchange of Questions 
It was likely to be a painful expe- 
rience to a man when Socrates began 
to ask him questions. The questions 
seemed very simple, but the man usu- 
ally found himsfelf hopelessly entang- 
led before very long. The logic im- 
plicit in the questions left the man 
who attempted to reply quite without 
standing ground at last. Jesus knew 
how to ask questions in a very dis- 
concerting fashion. Sometimes He 
used them as weapons to disarm His 
foes. Sometimes He used them as a 
sort of mental and moral stimulant 
to rouse His hearers to think ade- 
quately on a subject concerning which 
they were in the habit of speaking su- 
perficially. A very interesting volume 
might be written on the questions 
of Jesus, and at the close of its pe- 
rusal the reader would know more 
about the great Teacher, more about 
the people with whom He talked, and 
more about humanity in general. 

In our study today the first ques- 
tioner is not the Master, but one of 
His hearers. He lifts a mooted ques- 
tion, with the deliberate purpose of 
seeing if Jesus will be able to give 
an answer which will be compellng 
and will command His auditor's re- 
spect. "What shall I do," he asks, 
"to inherit eternal life?" The Mas- 
ter determines at once to make the 
man reveal himself and show his in- 
tellectual and spiritual caliber, so He 
flashes back another question: "What 
is written in the law? how readesf. 
thou?" The man is a specialist in the 
law and Jesus gives him an opportu- 
nity to show what kind of an inter- 
preter he is. He appeals to an ex- 
pert to speak on a subject of which 
he is supposed to be a master. So in 
a moment the man who attempted to 
put Jesus to the test finds that the 
whole situation is changed and he is 
the one who is being tested. By one 
deft question Jesus has put the man 
on the defensive. 

We must not regard the conversa- 
tion as a mere matter of mental gym- 
nastics, in which Jesus proved His 
possession of the greatest quickness 
of movement and the most powerful 
mental muscles. Mere intellectual 
fencing did not appeal to Jesus. He 
wanted to help the man and He chose 
the method which would most surely 
reach him. It is often true that you 
will influence a man more by letting 
him talk to you than by talking to 
him. 

The Summary or the Law 
Henry van Dyke, in his recently 
published story, The Lost Boy, tells 
of a Greek who approached the wise 
men of the Jews at Jerusalem. Stand- 
ing before one of them, he said, "Mas- 
ter, I am willing i'o become thy dis- 
ciple if thou wilt teach me the whole 
law while I stand before thee thus — 
on one foot." He was met by a gruff 
rebuff. Then he went to another 
teacher with the same request. "The 
rabbi's eyes twinkled and his lips 
were smiling as he answered prompt- 
ly: 'Do nothing to thy neighbor that 
thou wouldst not he should do to 
thee. This is the whole law; all the 
rest follows from this.' " 

The questioner of Jesus found him- 
self suddenly faced by the same prob- 
lem which, confronted the teacher in 
this story. He must attempt to get 
the gist of the law into a few phrases. 
It must be said at once that his an- i 
swer was all to his credit. He had 
evidently studied the law faithfully 




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and pondered it deeply. And he had 
sought its inner spirit and not merely 
its surface meaning. His quest had 
been in no small measure rewarded. 
His reply must have brought a glad 
light of approval to the eyes of Jesus. 
He did not use his own words. He 
quoted a sentence from Deuteronomy 
and a phrase from Leviticus as having 
in them the very quintessence of the 
law. To love God absolutely and to 
love one's neighbor as oneself was to 
fulfill the very last purpose of the law. 
Now when one thinks of the mass of 
externalities in which this Jewish 
scribe might have lost himself this re- 
ply becomes very remarkable indeed. 
The man who knows what to quote 
has found the soul of a book. This 
man knew what to quote. He had 
found the soul of the law. He had 
traced the stream of a noble life to 
its source and he toad found that 
source in a great devotion. 

The man who summed up the law 
as requiring love to God and one's 
neighbor came wonderfully near to 
finding the gospel in the law. No won- 
der that the words of Jesus came forth 
quickly and decisively and ringing 
with approval: "Thou hast answered 
right: this do and thou shalt live." 

Asking the Wrong Questions 

Just at this moment, however, the 
man showed how very grave were his 
limitations. There were two ways to 
meet an injunction like this about 
loving one's neighbor. The injunction 
might be interpreted in the largest 
possible way, and the man might seek 
to grow in nobility and generosity un- 
til he could obey it, or the injunction 
might be interpreted in the narrow- 
est possible way, so that the man 
would not have too much trouble in 
obeying it. The scribe who was talk- 
ing with Jeus was not seeking to grow 
as large as a great law. He was seek- 
ing to have the law shrink to a size 
where he could handle it. "Wanting 
to feel that he had done his duty, 
he pressed Jesus with the question, 



"Who is my neighbor?" He wanted to 
hear that his neighbors were only 
Jews. He wanted the circle to be 
small enough to be dealt with in a 
fashion which did not make too heavy 
a requirement. Perhaps tie went so 
far as to want Jesus to say that his 
neighbors were only the godly Jews. 
Instead of asking how he could be a 
good neighbor to other men he asked 
how many of them he must consider 
his neighbors. He wanted to get the 
mathematics of neighborliness worked 
out by reducing it to its lowest terms. 
He does not seem to have been greatly 
troubled about the thought of loving 
God absolutely. That was abstract 
enough in his mind to leave him in 
a state of fair comfort, but he did 
not want to promise to love too many 
people as much as he loved himself. 
If he could get the number down with- 
in reasonable limits he felt that with- 
out a doubt he could keep the law 
and inherit eternal life. 

The man had gone far in his 
thought, but in spite of all his attain- 
ments in manly earnestness, the spirit 
of calculation which so characterized 
later Judaism had settled upon him. 
The man'who could ask, "Who is my 
neighbor?" had not after all been able 
to find the gospel in the law. 

Answering the Right Question 

By one of those quick and subtle 
movements of thought so characteris- 
tic of His method of teaching, Jesus 
answered the question the man ought 
to have asked instead of the one he 
had propounded. He told a story of 
a man in dire need. A priest and a 
Levite passed by without giving him 
any help. Probably they could have 
given erudite reasons to show that he 
was not their neighbor. Then a de- 
spised Samaritan came by. With no 
technical quibbles and with only a ten- 
der heart to guide him, the Samari- 
tan ministered to the man as if he 
had been his own brother. Kindness 
could scarcely go farther than his 
open-handed generosity. Now, said 



Jesus in effect, the important ques- 
tion is, who was a good neighbor to 
the^ wounded man? and not, was the 
man their neighbor? When the ques- 
tion was put thus the scribe was 
forced to reply that the man who 
showed mercy on the traveler in des- 
perate straits was the one who proved 
a real neighbor to him. "With a cer- 
tain sternness in his voice „esus 
said, "Go thou and do likewise," and 
closed the interview. 

A laan with so much noble se- 
riousness of character as this scribe 
doubtless went away with new light 
in his mind and heart. Henceforth 
he was to ask not, "Who is my neigh- 
bod?" but "To whom may I be a neigh- 
bor?" and any man in need made a 
claim whose vadility he must recog- 
nize if it was in his power to satisfy 
that need. 

The daring of this parable of Jesus 
is extraordinary. To cite a Samari- 
tan as a man who kept the spirit of 
the law where a priest and a Levite 
failed was a challenge which the lead- 
ers of the Jews would surely recog- 
nize. When we see their eyes flash 
with hard anger as the story is re- 
peated to them, we begin to under- 
stand that hard days and hard expe- 
riences await Jesus. The parable of 
the good Samaritan helped to seal the 
fate of the great Teacher who uttered 
it. — N. Y. Cristian Advocate. 



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January 15, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



ai. 
ir> 
bei 
an 



1:20 



2:05 



2:45 



3:45 

7:10 
7:15 



7:15 
7:30 
7:35 

7:40 
8:15 

8:20 
9:30 
9:40 

12:30 



12:45 

12:55 
1:00 

1:35 



2:30 
2:00 
3:30 
4:20 

5:00 
6:40 
6:10 



6:30 
6:35 
7:30 

10:13 



10:20 
10:31 



11:13 



B. Following schedule figures pub- 
only as information, and are not 
nteed. 

a. m. No. 32, daily. The South- 
ern's Southeastern Limited. Pull- 
man drawing-room, compartment, 
and open section sleeping cars 
Jacksonville, Augusta, and Aiken 
to New York. Day coaches. Dining 
car service. 

a. m. No. 112 daily. Local for 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Winston-Salem to 
Kaleigh open at 9:30 p. m. 
a. m. No. 29, daily. Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and 
observation, sleeping cars New 
York, and Richmond to Birming- 
ham, and New York to Columous, 
Ga. Daily tourist car Washington 
to San Francisco via Sunset Route. 
Dining car service, 
a. m. No. 30, daily. Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room, 
and observation sleeping cars Birm- 
ingham, Columbus, and Asheville 
to New York, and Birmingham to 
Richmond, Va. Tourist car San 
Francisco-Washington. Dining car 
service. 

a. m. No. 31, daily. The South- 
ern's Southeastern Limited. Pull- 
man drawing-room, open section, 
and compartment sleeping cars New 
York to Jacksonville, Aiken, and 
Augusta, and New York to Ashe- 
ville. Day coaches. Dining car 
service. 

a. m. 45 daily local for Charlotte, 
connecting for Atlanta and points 
south. 

a. m. No. 8 daily local for Rich- 
mond. 

a. m. 1st No. 37 daily. New York 
and New Orleans Limited, Pullman 
drawing-room, state-room, open 
section and observation sleeping 
cars, New York and New Orleans; 
club car Washington to Montgom- 
ery; Pullman parlor car Greensboro 
to Montgomery. Solid Pullman 
lanta. Pullman observation parlor 
cial. Pullman drawing-room, open 
section sleeping cars New York to 
Asheville, Charlotte, Macon and At- 
car Greensboro to Atlanta. Solid 
Pullman train, with dining car ser- 
vice. 

a. m. 2nd No. 37 dally Atlanta ape- 
train with dining car service, 
a. m. No. 108 daily local Greensboro 
to Goldsboro. 

a. m. No. 11 daily local to Atlanta. 
Pullman drawing-room, sleeping 
cars Norfolk to Asheville, and Rich- 
mond to Charlotte, 
a. m. No. 154, dally except Sunday. 
Local to Ramseur. 
a. m. No. 237, daily for Winston- 
Salem and North Wllkesboro. Hand- 
les Pullman sleeping car Raleigh 
to Winston-Salem, 
a. m. No. 133 daily local for Mt. 
Airy. 

a. m. No. 44 daily for Washington 
and points north. 

a. m. No. 144 daily for Raleigh, 
Selma and Goldsboro; handles At- 
lanta-Raleigh sleeping car. 
p. m. No. 21 daily local to Ashe- 
ville and Waynesville, connecting at 
Asheville with Carolina Special for 
all points west. Coaches and Pull- 
man chair car. 

p. m. No. 7 daily local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Seneca and 
Columbia. 

p. m. No. 130 dally local for San- 
ford, Fayetteville and Wilmington, 
p. m. No. 14 daily local for Rich- 
mond. Sleeping car Danville to 
Richmond. 

p. m. No. 36, daily U. S. Fast Mall, 
for Washington, New York and 
points north. Pullman sleeping cars 
Birmingham and New Orleans to 
New York, and Asheville to Rich- 
mond. Pullman chair car Greenville 
to Washington. Dining car ser- 
vice. 

p. m. No. 151 daily except Sunday 
for Madison. 

p. m. No. 207 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

p. m. No. 230 daily except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

p. m. No. 22 dally for Raleigh, Sel- 
ma and Goldsboro. Pullman chair 
car Waynesville to Goldsboro. 
p. m. No. 131 dally for Mount Airy 
connecting at Rural Hall, dally ex- 
cept Sunday with train for North 
Wllkesboro. 

p. m. No. 13 dally local for Salis- 
bury; handles Pullman sleeping car 
Richmond to Asheville, which car 
may be occupied until 7 a. m. 
p. m. No. 35 dally U. S. Fast Mall 
through to Atlanta and New Or- 
leans. Pullman sleeping cars New 
York to New Orleans and Birming- 
ham, and Pullman chair car Wash- 
ington to Greenville. Dining car 
service. 

p. m. No. 132 dally local for San- 
ford. 

p. m. No. 235 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

p. m. No. 43 daily for Atlanta and 
points south. Pullman sleeping car 
Raleigh to Atlanta, 
p. m. 1st No. 38 dally Atlanta Spec- 
ial. Pullman drawing-room, open 
section sleeping cars Macon, Atlan- 
ta, Charlotte and Asheville to New 
York. Pullman observation car At- 
lanta to Greensboro. Solid Pullman 
train with dining car service, 
p. m. No. 233 dally for Winston- 
Salem. 

p. m. No. 12 dally local to Richmond, 
Handles Pullman sleeping cars 
Asheville to Norfolk and Charlotte 
to Richmond. 

p. m. 2nd No. 38 daily New York 
and New Orleans Limited. Pullman 
drawing-room, state room, open sec- 
tion and observation sleeping cars 
New Orleans to New York; club 
car Montgomery to Washington. 
Solid Pullman train with dining 
car service. 



Our Little Folks 



THE WAY OF IT 

A little boy made him a wee snowball, 

And rolled it about in the snow; 
And it gathered the crystals and clung 
to them all, 
And O how that snowball did grow! 
O my! 

You've made one, of course, so you 
know! 

A little boy whispered a word one day 

Unkind of some one he knew, 
And each one who heard it repeated 
his way 
The story till O how it grew! 
O my! 

And a heartache was caused by it, 
too! 

Two little red mittens the small ball 
rolled 

That grew in such magical way, • • 
And a little red tongue was the one 
that told 
The tale that grew big in a day. 
O my! 

Be careful, wee tongues, what you 
say! 

— Pauline F. Camp, in The House- 
keeper. 



GOLDENSEAL 

Willie found a fine knife in the toe 
of his Christmas stocking. It had 
three blades, all sharp as razors, and 
it was not long before the poor boy 
had a deep and painful cut on one 
of his thumbs. "Never mind," said 
mother; "I'll bind it up with yellow- 
root, and then it will not bleed any 
more, and soon your thumb will be 
as good as new. But I expect you 
may have a little scar to remind you 
of. your Christmas knife and its bad 
behavior. Sit down, Willie, and I 
will tell you the story of these mag- 
ical drops I have just put on your 
thumb. 

"When the early settlers came to 
America and became acquainted with 
their red brothers, the Indians, they 
found these savages knew a great 
many things which they did not. If 
one of them fell sick or met with 
an accident, his brother or his father 
could step into the woods and in a 
short time return with the remedy 
for it. The woods were the Indians' 
medicine chest. If his eyes were sore 
from too much smoke in the tepee, he 
went to the open hillside where a lit- 
tle plant with yellow roots and maple- 
like leaves grew. Pulling a handful, 
he returned to his lodge and brewed 
from the roots a tea, with which to 
bathe his eyes. The drops I have put 
on your thumb are very strong and 
will pucker and draw the sides of 
the cut flesh together. One name for 
the yellowroot is goldenseal, because 
the great rootstock has marks on it 
which look as if they were made by 
a seal. One is left each year when the 
leaf stalk breaks off in the fall. Gol- 
denseal is first cousin to the butter- 
cup. The first year it sends up only 
two round seed leaves. The second 
year comes one fine, big leaf similar 
to Cousin Buttercup, and the third 
summer one more small leaf and a 
tiny blossom appear. You would 
hardly know there was a flower if 
you did not look closely. It is very 
small and greenish-white in color. Af- 
ter the flower dies the leaves grow 
bigger, and by mid-summer each three- 
year-old plant holds proudly aloft its 
ripened fruit, which looks like a big 
red raspberry." — Margaret W. Leigh- 
ton. 



THE NORTH WIND AND THE SUN 

Aesop was a celebrated story-teller 
who was supposed to have lived about 
620 B. C. He was a native of Phryg- 
ia, which is a country of Asia Minor. 
Very little is known of his life ex- 
cept that he was a slave. On account 



of his talent, he was later given his 
freedom, and he turned his attention 
to travel. Croesus, King of Lydia, 
heard about his wisdom and invited 
him to his court. He was sent by 
Croesus to Delphi with a large amount 
of gold to offer a sacrifice to Apollo. 

He offered the sacrifice, but returned 
the money; and the Delphians, think- 
sing it was an act of sacrilege, had 
him hurled from a high precipice. 
His fables were mostly about animals 
end the forces of nature, and they al- 
ways ended with a moral. 

The fable of the "North Wind and 
the Sun" is one Aesop's typical fables, 
and runs in this manner: A dispute 
arose between the north wind and 
the sun, each claiming that he was 
stronger than the other. At last 
(hey agreed to try their powers upon 
a traveler, to see which could soon- 
est strip him of his cloak. The north 
wind had the first day; and gather- 
ing up all his force for the attack, 
he came whirling furiously down up- 
on the man, and caught up his cloak 
as though he would wrest it from 
him by one single effort; but the har- 
der he blew the more closely the man 
wrapped it around himself. Then 
came the turn, of the sun. At first 
he beamed gently upon the traveler, 
who soon unclasped him cloak and 
walked on with it hanging loosely 
from his shoulders. Then he shone 
forth in his full strength; and the 
man, before he had gone many steps, 
was glad to throw his cloak right off 
and complete his journey more lightly 
clad. Persuasion is better than force. 



DADDY'S INDIANS 

"I'm tired of everything," said Jack, 
and he threw down his ball and bat 
and went into the house. 

Charles followed hi mand tried to 
persuade him to come out and play 
in the sunlight. But Jack only pout- 
ed and said there was nothing that 
he wanted to do. He was not going 
to play ball or leapfrog or marbles 
or anything. 

"Boys, come here," called daddy 
from the kitchen door. 

The boys rushed out to see what 
daddy had, for he was always doing 
things to interest them. There he 
was, standing with two bows and a 
lot of arrows in his hands. 

"I thought maybe you would like to 
play Indian for a while," explained 
daddy, "so I made these for you while 
I was out in the barn." 

"Aren't they dandies?" exclaimed 
Jack, taking hold of one of the bows. 
"Now, daddy, you must show us how 
to shoot. " 

"Yes, do, daddy," cried Charles. "We 
will be big Indians if you will show 
us how." 

So daddy took them out Jin the 
yard and showed them how to shoot 
the arrows from the bows. They had 
a great time playing Indian the re- 
mainder of the afternoon. It was 
growing dusk when mamma called 
them to supper, and they were not 
yet tired of playing with their bows 
and arrows. 

"My, but daddy knows how to ihink 
up new plays when a fellow is just 
tired of everything!" said Jack. 

"He's better than anybody's daddy," 
answered Charles as the two boys ran 
in to supper. 

"Well, here is daddy's Indians!" 
were the words that greeted them. — 
W. D. Neale. 



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1 iPage Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 15, 1914 



Quarterly Meetings 



• H 

ASjHEVILLE DISTRICT— C. A. Wood, 
presiding Elder, Weaverville, N. C. 

First Round 

December 

Henderson Ct., Moores Grove 27-28 

Hendersenvllle 28 

Bethel, Asheville, night 28 

January 

Hot Springs, Hot Springs 3 

Marshall 4 

Haywood St., Asheville, night 4 

Mills River, Horseshoe iu-11 

Flat Rock, Flat Rock 11 

North Asheville, night 11 

Brevard Ct., Rosman 17 

Brevard 18 

Biltmore, night 18 

Sulphur Springs, Pleasant Hill 24-25 

West Asheville 25 

Black Mountain 30 

Swannanoa Ct., Swannanoa 31 

February 

Central, Asheville 1 

Weaverville .1 

Fairview Ct., Tweeds 7-8 

Tryon and Saluda, Tryon 8 

Weaverville Ct.. Salem 14-15 

Mars Hill, Laurel 15 

Leicester, Leicester 21-22 

Walnut, Jewell Hill 28 

March 

Spring Creek, Balm Grove 1 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— Plato T. Dur- 
ham, Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Charlotte— Tryon VSt 14 

Hrievard St., night 14 

Trinity .21 

Belmont, night ..21 

Chadwick : ...28 

Ijllworth, night ., 28 

January 

Derita, Trinity > .<,.,. ... . . . ,.Y, v g . v .3-4 

Spencer, Memorial, night ... r. .4 

Hickory Grove 10-11 

Calvary, night 11 

Pineville, Harrison 17-18 

Duncan Memorial and Huntesville, 

Duncan Memorial, night 18 

Weddington, Hebron 24 

Waxhaw, Waxhaw 25-26 

Prospect, Trinity 31 

February 

Monroe, Central 1 

North Monroe 1 

Ansonville, Ansonville 7-8 

Lilesville, Lilesville 8-9 

Morven, Sandy P 14-15 

Wadesboro, night 15 

tfriionville, Grace 21-22 

Pdlkton, Peachland, night 22-23 

Marcn 

Matthews, Matthews 1-2 

Marshville, Gilboa 7-8 

Mi: Zion, Mt. Zion 14-15 

(! 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT— G. T. Rowe, 
( 1 Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Wentworth Ct., Salem 20-21 

Riejidsvllle, p. m 21-22 

Greensboro Ct., Holt's 27-28 

Gibsonville Ct., Mt. Pleasant 28-29 

January 

Randolph Ct., Fairview .v. -.8-4 

East and West H. Point 4 

W. Greensboro Ct., Muir's 10-11 

West Market Street 11 

Pleasant Garden Ct., PI. Gr 17-18 

Walnut St. and Car., Car 18 

Uwharrle Ct., Concord 24-25 

UeatOn Ct., Denton 25-26 

February 

peep River Ct., West Bend ...31-1 

Asheboro, a. m. , 1 

Rai.dleman and N. St. Ptul's 1-2 

Coleridge Ct., Concord 7-8 

Ramseur and F'vllle, Ramseur 8-9 

Ruffln Ct. Ruffln 14-15 

District ^stewards will meet in West 
Market St. church, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 
at 10 a. m. 



MOUNT AIRY DISTRICT— R. M. Hoyle, 
Presiding Elder, Mount Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Summerfleld Ct, Center 27-28 

January 

,Mount Airy Ct., Salem 3-4 

Mount Airy Station 4-5 

J Ararit, Hunter's Chapel 10-11 

Stokesdale Ct., Stokesdale 17-18 

Walnut Ceve Ct., Pine Hall 24 

Madison and Stenevllle. Madison ..25-26 

Rural Hall Ct., Rural Hall 31 

February 

Filet Mountain Ct., Pllet Mountain ..1-2 

Jonesville Ct., Jonesville 7-8 

Elkln Statien 8-» 

Danbury Ct., Davis' Chapel 14-15 

Spray and Draper, Spray 21-22 

Leaksville Station 23-24 

Dobson Ct., Slloam 2> 

March 

YadklnVtlle, Bast Bend 1-2 

The district stewards will please meet 
me at Walnut Cove at 12 o'clock, Wed- 
nesday, Dec. 81. Let all attend, please. 



MORGANTON DISTRICT— J. E. GAY, 
Presiding Elder, Marion, N. C. 
First Round 

December 

Thermal City, Thermal City 20-21 

McDowell, Glenwood 27-28 

January 

Marion Ct., Carson's Chapel 2 

Table Rock, Oak Hill 3-4 

Morgan ton Station i". ............ .4-5 

Rutherford. Rutherfordton ..!..■? 10-11 

Groen River, Lebanon 1(J 

Forest City, Pleasant Grove 17-18 

Broad River, Wesley's hapel 24-25 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Henrietta, 25-26 

Cliffside, Cliff side 27 

Morganton Ct., Mt., 

Pleasant 31, Feb. 1 

February 

Connelly Springs, Connelly Springs, 7-8 

Mlcavllle, Shoal Creek 13 

Bald Creek. Elk Shoal 14-15 

Burnesville, Burnesville 15-16 

-Spruce Pine and Bakensville, Spruce 

Pine 21-22 

The districts stewards will meet in the 
Methodist church at Marion, Friday, Dec. 
19, at 2 p. m. 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— M. . 
H. Vestal, Presiding Elder, North i 
Wllkesboro, N. C. i 
First Round J i 

December I 

Laurel Springs, Chestnut Hill 20-21 1 

Wllkesboro Station 28-29 ' 

V 'January | 

Jefferson, Creston 2 \ 

Creston, Creston 3-4 i 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 7 

Boone, Fairview *. 10-11' 

Wilkes, Beulah 17-18 » 

North Wllkesboro Station 25-26 j 

February 

Elkville Mission, Stanton 1 

Hlk Park, Elk Park 8-9 j 

Avery, Pinola 14-15 

District stewards' meeting in North t 
Wilkesboro at 11 a. m., Dec. 30. 



SALISBURY DISTRICT — W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. , 
First Round 

January 

New London Ct., New London 17-18 > 

Gold Hill Ct., Gold Hill 18-19 I 

Woodleaf Ct., Cleveland 24-25 \ 

China Grove Statien, night 25-26 ' 

Concord Ct., Olivet 31 

February 

Concord Ct., Olivet 1 

Concord, Forest Hill, night 1 

Albemarle Circuit, Be thesda 7-8 

Albemarle, Central, -'night 8 

Kannapelis Statien 14-15 

Landis Circuit, Landls 14-15 

Bethel and Love* Chapel, Bethel ..21-22 

Concord, Ep worth, night 22 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m. 28, Mar. 1 

Concord, Westford, night ......28, Mar. 1 

The district stewards will please meet 
In First Church, Salisbury, Dec. 16, 1913, 
12 o'clock noon, sharp. 

Let every charge be represented. 



SHELBY w I STRICT — J. R. Scroggs, 
Presiding Elder, Shelby, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Lowesvllle, Hills Chapel 17-18 

Moores, Mtn. Island, p. m 18 

Polkville, Clover Hill 24-25 

South Fork, Plateau 31 

February 

Lincoln ton Station 1 

Lincolnton Ct., Plsgah 7-8 

Lowell, Lowell .14 

McAdenvllle McAdenville, night 14 

Crouse, Antloch 21 

Cherryville, Mary's Chapel 28 

District Stewards will meet at Shelby 
on Wednesday, Dec. 31, 1913, at 2 o'clock 
p. m. ^ 

STATESVILLE DISTRIST— L. Tgj Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Statesvllle Ct., Trinity, 11 a. m 17-18 

Broad St., Broad St., night 18-19 

Iredell Ct., Olin, 11 a. m 24-25 

Race St., Race St., night 25-26 

Alexander Ct., Hiddenite, 

11 a. m 31, Feb. 1 

February 

Stony Point Ct., Stony Pt., ntght 1-2 

Catawba Ct., Catawba, 11 a. m. . .7-8 
Cool Springs Ct., New Salem, 

11 a. m 14-15 

Troutman Ct., Vanderburg, 11 a. m., 21-22 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night, 22-23 
Mooresville Ct., Fairview, 

11 a. m 28, Mar. 1 

■ March 

Davidson Sta., Davidson, night 1-2 

Marion Station 7-8 

N. Lenoir Ct., Mt. Zion, 11 a. m. ..7-8 

Lenoir Sta., Lenoir, night ,8-9 

The district stewards, pastors and lay 
leaders will meet In Broad" St. church at 
Statesville on Dec. 17, at 12 o'clock, noon. 
A full attendance of the above persons 
is earnestly desired. 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
deil, Presiding Elder, R. 2, Asheville, 
N. C. 

; ' 911 January 

Bryson and Whlttler, Whittler 17-18 

Judson Ct., Judson 18-19 

Glenvtlle Ct., Glenvllle 23-24 

Highlands Ct., Highlands .26-26 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 


HOLT'S 


CHAPEL 






FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 


MOUNT 


fN" ame 




Dollars 


Cents 




Date 191 

















MISSIONS AND CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 



Name. 
Date .. 



Doll 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1 40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities.; 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. b C. 



Franklin Ct., Salem 28-29 

Macon Ct., Union 30-31 

February 

Franklin Station 1-2 

Hayesville Ct., Bethel 4-5 

Ranger Ct., Ranger 7 

Murphy Station 8-9 

Robbinsville, Robblnsville 11-12 

Murphy Ct., Tomotla 14 

Andrews Station 15-16 

Crestmont ..21-22 

Waynesv'ille Station 24 

Canton Station 25 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, Pre- 
siding Elder, Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

Januar 

Davie Circuit, Callahan 17-18 

Mocksville 18-19 

Linwood Circuit, Lin wood 24-25 

Lexington , 25-24 

Forsyth Ct, Bethel ...31, Feb. 1.. 

' February 

Forsyth Ct., Bethel 1 

Cooleemee, night 1-2 

Lewlsvllle, Sharon 7-8 

Southsld.e night 8-9 

Centenary, 11 a. m. 1* 

West End, 7:30 p. m 14 

Farmlngton, Farmlngton 21-22 

Advance. Advance 22-23 

FOR SALE 

Chicago Typewriter, new, $25.00; Sun 
Typewriter,' second-hand, $20.00. 

L. P. Bogle, 
Ruffln, N. C. 



Office Phone 376 Residence Phone 1345 



CHAS. W. MOSELEY, M. D. 

DISEASES OF STOMACH AND INTESTINES 



101 W. Market Street, Greensboro, N. C. 



Hardy 1-y car 
Apple Trees 

20 cents Each 

$2.00 per dozen, $12 per 100 f. o. b., 
Stovall. We have the trees tn« 
Southern planter needs— Maples 
Elms, Catalpa, Cedars, Firs, Hem 
locks, Hedge Plants and Fruits. Wc 
know how to make things grow, s* 
you get strong, thrifty trees ant 
plants— the only kind you ought tc 
think about. Send for our cataloi 
and let us show you how you cai 
buy treei that are suited for you 
place. Write now— a postal will do 
HOWARD NURSERY CO 
Box 215, Stovall, N. C 



January 15, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



Iferiilizers wiik personalit/ 

RqysTERS 

ct^t, ZT/tc 4Lo*pl£, <u£b&£4 y£cU- ^J** 





TRADE MARK 
REGISTERED 



i 



F.S.Ro\jsier Guano Co., 
Norfolk, Va,. 
Sold evferyvvkerc 



North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 

Entered the 1 ost Office at Greensboro, N. C. , as 
mall matter o the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year H.M 

Six Months 76 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 
per year. 

Make all remittances to CHRISTIAN 
ADVOCATE, Greensboro, N. C. 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION (INC.) 

D. B. Goltrane, President Concord 

Rev. J. R. Scroggs, Vlce-Pres., Charlotte 

M. L. Cure, Secretary Greensboro 

W. G. Bradshaw High Point 

T. C. Hoyle Greensboro 



t From the Field j 

NOTICE TO YOUNG PEOPLE 

Your second vice-president wishes 
to announce to the Young People's 
Societies her change of address to 
Charlotte, N. C. She also requests 
the newly elected presidents of Young 
People's Auxiliaries to write her at 
once the list of officers for 1914. Un- 
less this is done you will not be in 
the mailing list for the literature, 
blanks, etc., sent out from this office. 

Mrs. Plato T. Durham, 

Second Vice-Pres. 

Charlotte, N. C. 



AN EXAMPLE WORTHY OF 
FOLLOWING 

Rev. R. C. Craven, pastor of Trinity 
Church in Durham, last Saturday in- 
formed me that his church has under- 
taken to pay the way through Trin- 
ity College of a woithy young preach- 
er who could not otherwise get an 
education. I was asked to name a 
man; I did so without delay; and he 
has already availed himself of the op- 
portunity. 

I have in mind now at least two 
other men of the same character, and 
there ought to be other churches in 
North Carolina that will be anxious 
to make the same sort of invest- 
ment." 

I present the opportunity and I 
should like to have a quick response. 

W. P. Few. 



WEST CONCORD 

The pastor, Rev. G. A. B. Holderby, 
writes: 

We were cordially received for our 
second year at West Concord Station, 
by many kind words, hearty hand- 
shakes, and a bountiful pounding. For 
all of this we thank God and take 
courage. We expect to bring up col- 
lections in full this year; have receiv- 
ed six members since Conference. 
Pray for us. We will bring up full 
quota of Advocate subscribers. 



SHEPPARD-HOBSON RESOLUTION 
FOR NATIONAL CONSTI- 
TIONAL PROHIBITION 

Many letters from different states 
have been coming to this office inquir- 
ing about petition work in behalf of 
the Sheppard-Hobson resolution. Up 
on its introduction, the resolution was 
referred to the committee on the Ju- 
diciary in both branches of Congress. 

The A. S. L. does not ask that pe- 
titions in behalf of this legislation be 
sent from churches or organizations 
as such. There are two reasons for 
this. First, and most important, is 
the fact that individual letters to Sen- 
ators and Representatives are much 
more effective than stereotyped print- 
ed forms signed by organizations. Ev- 
ery Senator and Representative will 
feel impelled to give attention to ev- 
ery individual letter conveying a re- 
quest for his support on this or any 
given bill. 



Second, the Women's Christian Tem- 
perance Union inaugurated the print- 
ed petition form work weeks before 
the Sheppard-Hobson Resolution was 
introduced, and we desire to prevent 
complications which might result from 
duplication of effort along this line. 
Therefore, we will ask that every man 
and woman interested in this measure 
shall send a personal letter to his 
Representative in the House, and to 
each of his Senators asking for sup- 
port of this Resolution, as soon as fi- 
nal reference of the Resolution shall 
have been deterimned. 

Arrangements are partially made 
for hearings and it is probable that 
before the end of January a series of 
hearings will have begun in the cam- 
paign for the passage of the Sheppard- 
Hobson Resolution for National Con- 
stitutional Prohibition. 

Edwin C. Dinwiddle, Supt. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

My dear Brother Blair: 

Since I wrote you the Panama-Pa- 
cific Exposition people have furnished 
me a fine set of slides showing the 
Panama Canal and the Exposition 
buildings. I shall be glad to show 
these in any church or hall for the 
benefit of any of our churches. Please 



announce that if the church furnishes 
the lantern and operator I shall give 
my service. Let any one wishing this 
please write me in care of the Advo- 
cate by the first of March. 

J. A. B. Fry. 
El Paso, Tex., Jan. 7. 



CHILD LABOR DAY 

The first social Sunday in each new 
year is Child Labor Day. A commit- 
tee representing three national organ- 
izations has prepared a calendar of so- 
cial Sundays and it retains as Child 
Labor Day the fourth Sunday in Jan- 
uary which has been set apart for 
seven years past by the National Child 
Labor Committee and which falls this 
year on January 25th. 

About two million children under 
sixteen are at work and a fourteen 
year limit in all common gainful oc- 
cupations is not yet an established 
fact in any state. Even for factory 
work it is not universal, although such 
progress has been made since the for- 
mation of the National Child Labor 
Committee in 1904 that the rank and 
file of states today have advanced the 
standard of the most progressive ten 
years ago. But in many states can- 
neries are exempt from limitations of 
hours, and a few have also no age 



limit for cannery work. Street work 
is now recognized as demanding reg- 
ulation, but no state includes . them 
all in a 14 year limit and the public 
seems unaware that they ought to be 
classed with the extra-hazardous occu- 
pations closed to all under 18 years. 
Agricultural work has been included 
in certain provisions of the child la- 
bor law in Tennessee and New York 
but there is no other official recogni- 
tion of the wrong involved in includ- 
ing children in the gangs of tempor- 
ary workers commonly employed on 
certain farms. 

The Committee appeals for a wider 
interest in the children who work, a 
more urgent demand for good child 
labor laws and a better following up 
and enforcement of such laws as do 
exist. A pamphlet of general facts 
about child labor and a special leaf- 
let on street trading have been pre- 
pared for clergymen or teachers who 
wish to observe child labor day or 
for others who are interested in the 
subject. A card addressed to the Na- 
tional Child Labor Committee, 105 
East 22nd Street, New York, will 
bring them to you free of charge. 

The N. C. Child Labor Committee re- 
quests that the day be observed. 

W. H. Swift. 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 15, 1914 



m 



PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 1914 



The Board of Publication looks forward to the ensuing 
Conference year with great hope. Under the plan adopted 
by our recent Conference it is expected that a twenty per 
cent, increase is to be regarded as the minimum. We ought 
to go far beyond this mark. With many thousand families 
represented in the membership of our church, still without 
the weekly visits of our paper, there is a great field open 
to us for development, and we trust the year before us will 
witness such a spirit of co-operation as we have never had 
before. 

Last year was, in every way, the most successful year in 
the history of our paper in the matter of co-operative effort 
to give it wide circulation. While we added an unusual 
number of new subscribers, however, we failed to look as 
carefully after renewals as we should. The result was that 
our net increase did not compare favorably with the large 
number of new subscribers added to the list. We must this 
year not only secure all the new subscribers allotted, but 
we must see that the old list is renewed. According to the 
plan adopted, in case of failure to renew any subscriber on 
the list, we must see to it that a new name is found to take 
the place of the one discontinuing. So the allotment to 
each charge this year is the number apportioned to the 
charge by the District Stewards plus the number failing to 
renew. To illustrate: Suppose the Greensboro Circuit has 
fifteen new subscribers allotted, and the list shows forty al- 
ready taking the paper. In the effort to renew the list Brother 
Townsend finds five who decline to renew. It will then 
require that he and his people secure the renewals and five 
new subscribers to take the place of the five who discontinue, 
plus the fifteen allotted to the charge. This is the plan that 
our Committee on Books and Periodicals adopted with the 
view of making provision for the more diligent effort to hold 
the list we already have, and to make sure of a net in- 
crease of not less than twenty per cent. 

Premiums and Prizes 

With the small margin on which we are compelled to do 
business, it is impossible to pay commissions of any conse- 
quence. It is quite easy and natural for those outside to 
make figures and show that we are mistaken about this. But 
a man who has, for a dozen years in succession, studied the 
question on the inside must be in a position to speak with a 
little more certainty than those who have only a theoretic 
knowledge of the subject. Without hesitation the Manager 
of this business declares that no considerable amount can be 
used in the form of compensation to those who assist in keep- 
ing up and extending the circulation. This would not be 
true if we were publishing a paper that could appeal to the 
whole country and to all classes. Such papers can afford 
to purchase their subscription list, and absolutely eschew the 
matter of income from subscription. But this cannot be 
so with a church paper confined to the narrow limits of 
one patronizing Conference. 

However, we have decided to set apart a small amount 
for compensation of those who look after the collections and 
secure the new subscribers, and are now arranging a 

Series of Premiums and Prizes 

which will make it possible for every one who helps to hold our 
lists and to secure a larger circulation to be rewarded for 
their service. So while we are not quite ready to make 
full announcement, those who begin work at once may rest 
assured that their work will count and that they will receive 
their reward. Those who begin at once will have the ad- 
vantage of reaching the goal all the sooner. 

Following is an outline of our premiums and prizes to 
which there may be some additions later, and of which we hope 
in a week or two to show cuts fully illustrating each one. 
Our friends may rest assured that all the goods offered are 
genuine first class articles, and every one will appeal especially 
to a preacher's wife. While we prefer that the pastors and 
their wives take up this work and secure the premiums, yet, in 
case they do not care to they may turn it over to any members 
of the congregation who are willing to undertake it. 



List of Premiums and Prizes 

No. 1. One 26-piece Wm. Rogers Triple Plate 12 oz. Silver 
Set, consisting of one Oak or Mahogany Chest, -Six Knives, 
Six Forks, Six Tablespoons, Six Teaspoons, One Sugar Bowl 
and One Butter Knife. The above will be given to the one 
who secures fifty new subscribers. 

No. 2. To the one who will secure thirty -five new sub- 
scriptions, we will give the same assortment of ware only 
without the chest. 

No. 3. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Knives and Forks 
and Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twenty-five 
new subscribers. 

No. 4. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons and one 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in fifteen new sub- 
scriptions. 

No. 5. One Set Rogers Teaspoons, one Sugar Shell, and 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twelve to fifteen 
new subscriptions. 

No. 6. To the ones who will secure ten subscriptions, we 
will give their choice of the following premiums: 

A. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons, one Set 
Rogers Nickle Silver Knives and Forks in a nice box. 

B. One Set Stag Handle Carver, consisting of Carving 
Knife, Fork and Steel. 

C. One Set Aluminum Ware, consisting of one Aluminum 
6-quart Pudding-Pan, one 5-quart Aluminum Milk Pan, one 
Aluminum Dipper, and one Aluminum Cake-Pan. 

* # # * 

In addition to the above we offer the following 
Grand Prizes 

1. To the one sending in the largest number of new sub- 
scribers, provided the number shall not be less than 50, we 
offer, in addition to the premium, one No. 2690 Forbes Quadru- 
ple Plate Tea Set, consisting of one 2y 2 pt. Tea Pot, one Sugar 
Bowl, one Cream Pitcher, one Spoon Holder handsomely en- 
graved, and one Butter Dish. 

2. To the one securing the second largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 40, we offer : One 
Nickle-Plated Coffee Percolator Machine, that does away 
with the tannic acid in coffee, and furnishes the pure juice 
of the coffee, especially adapted to the use of old persons 
who are deprived of the use of the beverage on account of its 
injurious effect. With this machine, you can make the best 
drip coffee in five minutes, without injurious qualities. 

3. To the one securing the third largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 30, we offer: 
One Satin-Finished Tilting Triple Plate Water Pitcher, in 
tilting frame. 

4. To the one securing the fourth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 25, we offer : One 
Housekeeper's Casserole, with nickel outside cover — a beauti- 
ful article, and suitable for anyone's table. 

5. To the one securing the fifth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 20, we offer : One 
Kitchen Set, consisting of one Meat Broiler, Ice Pick, Meat 
Fork, Basting Spoon, Butcher Knife, Bread Knife, Cleaver, 
Paring Knife, Can Opener, Bread Toaster, and one ten-hook 
rack to hold above — eleven pieces in all. 

6. To the one securing the sixth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 15, we offer : One 
Ladies' or Gents' Pearl Handle Good Metal Pocket Knife. 

In each case it is understood that the renewals are to 
be collected and in case of the failure of any old subscriber to 
renew, a new subscriber is to be found to take the place of 
the one discontinuing. In no case can a premium or prize be 
awarded where the renewals are neglected. 

Cash must accompany each name sent in, except where 
the pastor is willing to become absolutely responsible. 

Let the work begin at once so that all may have the benefit of 
the paper for the Conference year. 

Address all correspondence regarding the above to 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, If. C. 




Official Oigan of tbe Western Rorth jEarolin^ Terence 
met boaist episcopal einircb, $<X^^ 



Thursday, January 22, 1914 




Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 22, 1914 




Young Men to Govern the City 
The new mayor of New York is thirty-four 

leading member of the Mayor's "cabinet," is 
to the office of Chamberlain, and thereby the 
four million people. The rule of Tammany Hall 
barely thirty-two. Henry Moskowitz, reared 
asm, ideals and a passion for social service, 
on the Bowery for a living when a boy, has at 
the age of thirty-four been appointed by the 
Mayor President of the Civil Service Commis- 
sion. The average age of the four men who 
will cast eleven of the sixteen votes in the 
Board of Estimates and Apportionment, a 
board that will handle almost two hundred 
million annually, is only thirty-four years. 

To these young men has been committed the 
tremendous task of governing a community of 
Baraca men in the State. He is an active mem- 
has been admittedly bad. The people at the 
polls by an immense majority said that they 
desire a change. The new officers have been 
given the reins of government with the expec- 
tation that the city will enjoy an administration 
characterized by efficiency, economy and justice. 
Some of the friends of the new administration 
think thaftonly young men like Mayor Mitehel 
and his associates in office, men with enthusi- 
The Terrible Disaster in Southern Japan 
could be relied upon to accomplish the work 
that the people have intrusted to these youthful 
public servants. 

* * # * 

A Young Woman Who Does Things 

Miss Fern Hobbs, a member of the Oregon 
bar and private secretary to the Governor of 
the State, has a /habit of rendering extraordi- 
nary service. Among her latest activities was 
the closing of the saloons of Copperfield after 
the city official and the sheriff had failed to en- 
force an ordinance requiring that the saloons 
close. She demanded that the mayor and city 
councilmen resign, which being denied, she or- 
dered Col. Lawson, of the Coast Artillery, tc 
place the town under martial law. After tne 
town had been closed up, she appeared as spe- 
cial counsel for the state at a hearing to re- 
move the sheriff for willful neglect of duty. 

# # * # 

North Carolina Leads 

For the fourth consecutive year North Caro- 
lina produces a larger yield of cotton to the 
acre than any other state in the union. The 
tobacco crop of North Carolina is estimated as 
worth thirty-one million dollars, which is two 
million more than Kentucky — the second state 
in point of production. North Carolina last 
year grew eight million bushels of sweet pota- 
toes, one million more than Georgia produced. 
In the quantity of peanuts grown, North Caro- 
lina leads all the rest of the states. 

The Sultan of Turkey Objects to Saleeby 

It was the intention of Mr. Bryan, the Secre- 
tary of State, to appoint Mr. A. B. Saleeby, of 
Salisbury, N. C, consul to Syria; but the Sul- 
tan has notified Mr. Bryan that the appoint- 
ment of Saleeby will not be acceptable to him. 

As many Advocate readers know, Mr. Saleeby 
is a public-spirited merchant of Salisbury, a 
native Syrian, and one of the most enthusiastic 
Baraca men in the State. He is a nactive mem- 
ber of the First Methodist church of Salisbury. 

The Terrible Disaster in Southern Japan 

The official reports brought out the following 
features of the disaster : The eruption of Sa- 
kura-Jima covered the entire island of Sakura 
with a layer of lava and ashes, under which lie 
the bodies of many of the dead ; the number will 
never be known. Kagoshima, a prosperous 
town of 60,000 inhabitants, is in ruins. The 
entire island of Kiushiu, an area of 3,000 square 
miles, is covered with volcanic ashes. 



TheOxypathor et Cetera 

The North Carolina Board of Health has ren- 
dered a good service by showing exactly what 
the Oxypathor is. In brief, it is six inches of 
nickel-plated gas pipe, filled with sand, sulphur 
and charcoal, that sells for thirty-five dollars. 
To be entirely just, we should add that a green 
cord is attached to the caps that cover each end 
of the pipe in which has been stored the health- 
giving ingredients of sand and charcoal. Yet, 
this is the instrument which is put on the mar- 
ket with assurance to the public that it will 
cure more 'than one hundred and seventy dis- 
eases and ailments, all for the small sum of 
thirty-five dollars. 

This fake serves to remind us of another a 
few years ago, known as the Electropoise. Peo- 
ple would put the precious bracelet of the elec- 
tropoise around the wrist or ankle at night; 
the next morning they would awake almost if 
not entirely well, when that magic bracelet 
had been attached by a cord to nothing more 
than an empty piece of piping with caps over 
the end. But they had paid a good round 
price for it, and at the same time were assured 
of many remarkable cures by testimonials prop- 
erly signed and dated. 

Why will people persist in being so duped? 
Why not use the hind foot of a rabbit? Why 
not get the buck-eye and carry it in the pocket ? 
These are old, reliable means of curing human 
ills, and so much cheaper than those modern 
fixtures encumbered as they are with big names. 
The Advocate was offered large advertising 
patronage some time since to help exploit this 
worthless device. 

# * # # 

Oak Ridge Institute Burned 

Two large buildings of the Oak Ridge Insti- 
tute and the Methodist Protestant church near 
by, burned at an early hour Saturday morning, 
January 17. The loss is estimated at more than 
thirty, thousand dollars, partly covered by in- 
surance. The fire originated in the Phi. Liter- 
ary Society hall and spread very rapidly, owing 
to a strong wind that fanned the flames to a 
fury. At one time a lar^e part of the vil- 
lage was threatened with destruction. 

Professors J. Allen and M. H. Holt, owners 
and principals of the Institute, announce that 
the work will continue without a break, and 
that new buildings, larger and better than the 
old, will be built at once. This will be good 
news to the vast body of alumni scattered over 
the state, and other friends of this fine old 
school that has done so much to educate the 
boys of North Carolina. 

Student Volunteers in Convention 

The seventh quadrennial convention of the 
Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Mis- 
sions, held in Kansas City from Dceember 31 
to January 4, was, according to all reports ap 
pearing in the daily papers and the leading re- 
ligious journals, a wonderful meeting with an 
attendance of 800 in excess of all previous Stu- 
dent Volunteer conventions. The official regis- 
tration list showed a total attendance of 5,031. 

Convention Hall, Kansas City', has been the 
place of many memorable gatherings. In it 
Moody preached his last sermon ; fourteen years 
ago in that hall Bryan was nominated for Pres- 
ident of the United States; five years ago this 
winter Gypsy Smith conducted a great evangel- 
istic campaign, when the doors on Sunday 
nights were locked one hour before time for 
service on account of the crowds that persis- 
tently sought admission after the great audito- 
rium was full; but for far reaching effect this 
convention of student volunteers surpassed all 
other meetings of that great assembly hall. 

A veteran newspaper man, who, in his long 
service at all sorts of gatherings and places as 
a reporter, had undergone pretty much all the 
experiences possible for one man, said to a 
friend : ' ' That convention gave me a unique sen- 
sation. ' ' 

With John R. Mott to preside, and such 



speakers as Robert E. Speer and W. J. Bryan to 
address thousands of consecrated young men 
and women who had given themselves for Chris- 
tian service in every part of the world, how 

could it be other than a great convention ? 

* * # # 

Notes Political and Personal 

Ex-Governor Robert B. Glenn, North Caroli- 
na's champion of p/ohibition, and now a suc- 
cessful lecturer on the Chatauqua platform, will 
be appointed by President Wilson a member 
of the Boundary Commission. This job carries 
a salary of $7,000, and will not require any 
large part of his time. He will continue his 
work on the platform. 

Whitehead Klutz, of Salisbury, N. C, has 
landed on the International Boundary Commis- 
sion, as secretary, at a salary of $4,000 a year. 
The position that Mr. Klutz goes to was held 
by Mr. White Busby, former private secretary 
to Ex-Speaker Cannon. 

Both Senators Simmons and Overman say 
that Mr. W. C. Hammer, of Asheboro, N. C, 
will be appointed district attorney for the west- 
ern district of North Carolina. Mr. Hammer's 
appointment has been held up for quite a while 
on account of charges preferred by Mr. Henry 
Page against Mr. Hammer, charges that ques- 
tioned his qualification for the office. 

A Piolific Race 

According to the Jewish year book there are 
more than 13,000,000 Jews in the world. Al- 
most half of these are in Russia. American Jews 
number 2,149,061. Both Asia and Africa have 
less than a million. The Jews are a prolific 
race and the gradual relaxation of persecution 

serves to increase the number. 

* # * # 

A Young Old Man 

Dr. Weir Mitchell, the noted author, had both 
the advantage of living long and not growing 
old with it. After long service in his pr^es- 
sion and in scientific studies, he turned to •He 
writing of fiction as an outlet for his abounding 
energies. 

Almost sixty-five when he wrote the first book 
of fiction ; the increase of years was marked by 
a larger output from his pen. After passing 
seventy, there often stood to his credit two vol- 
umes annually, "Hugh Wynne," alone would 
assure to this author a high place in American 
literature. 

Jfc. Jjb iMU jfc 

Canary Birds as Life Savers 

These little pet songsters of the household 
are coming to be looked upon as an essential 
equipment of mine-workers to inform them of 
the presence of poisonous gases in the mines. 
The birds are especially sensitive to the pres- 
ence of these dangerous gases, and show signs 
of distress before a man would even suspect the 
presence of danger. The canary bird is for this 
reason of peculiar value to the rescuers who en- 
ter a mine following a disaster^ when there is 
so great danger of becoming victims of the dead- 
ly gases. 

* # # # 

Support for the Dependent Families of Pris- 
oners 

The Davidsonian, with other papers of the 
state, are urging that prisoners, whether work- 
a state which calls itself Christian should cease 
reasonable wages, and the money should go to- 
ward the support of their dependent families. 

This contention seems to us both just and hu- 
mane. It is not right, while punishing a man 
for crime, to unnecessarily punish an innocent 
wife and dependent children. Why, then, 
should these innocent women and children be 
deprived of that support of husband and father 
which justly belongs to them? It is time that 
a state which calls itself Christian shoul dcease 
to rob the families of its prisoners of food and 
clothing that by every law of justice and hu- 
manity are theirs. Punish criminals, but do not 
at the same time unjustly and unnecessarily 
punish their families that are guilty of no 
crime. 



HortD Carolina €Dtlstlan Advocate 

ESTABLISHED 1S5S 



h. m. blair. Editor Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church, South 



Volumn LIX GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 15,1914 Number 2 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 

Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



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Make all remittances to CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



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scription has been paid. Subscribers are urgently re- 
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our custom to discontinue the paper when the time is 
out unless notice is given. Subscribers who do not 
intend to pay for the paper for over-time should notify 
the office to discontinue. Do not ask the pastor to 
have paper discontinued, but send notice direct to this 
office. 



■ | . » » 

EDITORIAL | 

* » 

OUR PICTURE GALLERY 

A new feature of our Advocate for the year 
1914, will be a sort of Conference Picture Gal- 
lery. We trust that our people will co-operate 
with us so that we may be able to show the faces 
of many of our preachers and leading laymen 
of the Conference, with a short sketch. This 
week we are slipping up on the most modest as 
well as the most popular member of our Confer- 
ence, and giving our readers a peep at his face. 
Dr. "Weaver did not know that we had a good 
cut of his in the office. Otherwise we think it 
likely we would have had some difficulty in get- 
ting him before our readers. But many a read- 
ers of the Advocate will be glad to look again 
thus into his face while he continues to live and 
work. 

For a man to be elected six times in succes- 
sion to the General Conference is an unusual 
record. So far as we know Dr. Weaver has 
never tried to get himself elected. He can 
enjoy this honor the more, therefore. He is a 
native of Ashe county, this state. He began 
public life as a school teacher in his young 
manhood, how long ago we forbear to say, join- 
ing the Holston Conference at Knoxville in 
1878. He soon found his place of leadership 
and when, falling by the transfer of 1890, in- 
to the new Western North Carolina Conference, 
he came as the presiding elder of the Asheville 
District. For this office he was peculiarly fit- 
ted, and has spent the greater portion of his 
life in the work on districts, though he is 
eminently successful in his work as pastor of 
our larger stations. 

Dr. Weaver apparently takes the world easy 
and keeps in a good humor with everybody and 
he is everybody's friend. We want him to live 
a long time and wish he could be multiplied 
many times. We write this not to boost Dr. 
Weaver, but to hand him a blossom while still 
living. 



IN THE MISSIONARY CAMPAIGN 

Rev. Frank Siler, Conference Missionary Sec- 
retary, was in Greensboro this week, preaching 
at Walnut Street on Monday night. He came in 
Monday morning from a week's stay in Win- 
ston-Salem, in co-operation with Doctors Boyer 
and Bain and others in lifting the indebtedness 
from Burkhead and Liberty churches. 



He reported a most encouraging condition of 
affairs in the Twin-City. He spoke in the inter- 
est of the Mission Board in practically all the 
churches. Centenary is being renovated with 
new windows and a fresh coat of paint, but goes 
steadily forward in her great missionary activ- 
ities. 

West End, not out of debt, has assumed sup- 
port of one or two additional workers in the 
foreign field. 

Brother Hutchins and Miss Blackwell are do- 
ing fine work at the Institutional church. Thriv- 
ing Sunday schools and congregations are in 
each of the other churches. 

Brother Siler went to Reidsville for an Insti- 
tute at Main Street Tuesday and Wednesday. 
He will spend Sunday, February 1st, in States- 
ville and will assist Rev. L. T. Mann, the pre- 
siding elder, in his District Institute at Hick- 
ory, Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 3-4. He 
says the co-operation of presiding elders, pas- 
tors and laymen is all he could ask. 



"EXCEPT FOR SACRAMENTAL OR SCI- 
ENTIFIC PURPOSES" 

The only objection we have to the bill recent- 
ly introduced in the United States Senate and 
in the House of Representatives calling for a 
constitutional amendment which will prevent 
the manufacture and sale or importation of in- 
toxicating liquors, is that exception for sacra- 
mental purposes. 

It may be well enough to except for scientific 
purposes, but everybody knows that no intoxica- 
ting liquor or wine is needed for sacramental 
purposes. It is a reproach to the Church of 
God that there should exist anywhere a senti- 
ment that encourages the use of intoxicating 
wine in the celebration of the Holy Sacrament. 

By every token the pure juice of the grape 
preserved sweet, as it is in every well stocked 
pantry of the country, is to be preferred in the 
sacrament, and there is no reason why the 
church should have to bear the reproach of be- 
ing responsible for any excuse for tolerating in- 
toxicating wine. There are some churches we 
are told where the officials contend for the use of 
fermented wine, but we think it high time that 
the ruling bodies in all our Protestant church- 
es serve notice that such a menace to sobriety 
shall be ruled out of all congregations. 



WHAT A LIQUOR JOURNAL POINTS OUT 

The move for national prohibition by writing 
it in the constitution of the United States, 
as proposed by the Anti-Saloon League of 
America, is treated as no joke by the liquor in- 
terests of the country. Among other things, a 
leading journal of the liquor dealers says : 

"The prohibition fight henceforth will be 
nation-wide and contemplates writing it into 
the National Constitution. To accomplish this 
will require the ratification of thirty-six out of 
the forty-eight states in the union. Of these 
nine are already in line through state prohibi- 
tion — Maine, Kansas, North Dakota, Oklahoma, 
Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina 
and West Virginia. The last five have been 
added in a period of six years. In addition to 
these there are eighteen states in which a ma- 
jor part of the people live in dry territory, 
in which we may be assured that prohibition 
sentiment predominates. ' ' 

The same journal in pointing out that the 
most effectual argument against prohibition is 



the well known argument that prohibition does 
not prohibit, declares in trenchent language : 

"The liquor traffic cannot save itself by de- 
claring that government is incapable of cop- 
ing with the problem that it presents; when 
the people decide that it must go, it will be 
banished. For this the liquor business will be 
to blame. It seems incapable of learning any 
lesson of advancement or any motive but gain. 
To perpetuate itself, it has formed an alliance 
with the slums that repel all conscientious and 
patriotic citizens. It deliberately aids the most 
corrupt political powers. Why? Because it 
has to ask immunity for its own lawlessness." 

This writer, who proceeds at length to ar- 
raign the liquor business by simply telling the 
truth about the traffic, hopes for, and urges 
the necessity of a far-reaching reform in the 
whole alcoholic liquor business. Any man whose 
only hope for the continuance of the liquor traf- 
fic in this country rests upon making it clean 
and good, had as well admit that the hour of 
its doom has already struck. 



OUR DEACONESS WORK 

It is a matter of regret that many of our 
people are slow to appreciate the work of a 
deaconess. In many of our larger towns and 
cities the interests of the church are suffer- 
ing because of the lack of the work which the 
deaconess is set apart to do. 

Of course it may be said that there are wo- 
men in every community who could do this 
work and whose religious life would be very 
much helped by the work. The same thing 
might be said with reference to the work of 
the ministry. But is it expedient that we dis- 
courage the professional minister who proposes 
to give his whole time to the work and attempt 
to substitute the lay-preacher? We ought to 
have more lay-preachers, to be sure, but we 
should have them as co-workers with those 
who feel called of God to give their lives to 
the work of preaching the gospel. 

There is a great field for the deaconess in 
our manufacturing districts and in the large 
outlying settlements in the suburbs of our cit- 
ies. It is in these places, making large de- 
mand for pastoral service, that our ministers 
find that to meet the demand fully they would 
have to spend all their time going from house 
to house, visiting the sick and looking after the 
destitute. In such places by all means there 
should be provided the very helpful work of 
the deaconess. 

The supply of deaconesses is by no means ade- 
quate. Henceforth we believe every pastor 
should be on the lookout for those whom God 
has called to this work. The pastor should not 
only be able to discover the young men upon 
whom God has set his seal for the holy work of 
the ministry, but he should also be able to dis- 
cover the young women who show signs of a 
similar call to the work of the deaconess. We 
believe God calls to this work as well as to that 
of the ministry. 

Let faithful pastors help the young people 
to discover themselves and to interpret the 
voice which sounds in the depths of the soul. 
' ' Many are called, but few are chosen, ' ' it may 
be sometimes because they need some one with 
the mind of the Spirit to interpret for them. 
"Behold, the fields are white unto the harvest, 
but the laborers are few." 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 22, 1914 



Contributions j 

» » 

CHRIST'S FIRST GREAT TEMPTATION 

By Geo. D. Herman 

' ' The principal thing in the world is a fact ; 
the principal fact is a person ; and the prin- 
cipal Person is Jesus Christ." This desert 
temptation is a tremendous fact, and it is a 
fact that pertains to Jesus Christ. 

Jesus Christ was both human and divine. 
He was the son of Mary and the son of God. 
This means that He is the God-Man. John 
states the case as clear as light: "The word 
became man, and dwelt among us." The eter- 
nal Word took upon Himself human nature, 
that human nature might become partaker of 
the Divine nature. 

It was in His human nature that Christ was 
tempted. He was tempted in all points as we 
are tempted, but without sin. He lived a sin- 
less life in a sinful world. He met and de- 
feated Satan by the word of God and prayer — 
the only way any one can overcome the evil one. 

The place of temptation was in the desert 
where there was no food. The temptation came 
at the end of a forty days' fast. The tempter 
was the Devil, who had led Adam and Eve 
into sin in the beginning. The Devil led Adam 
and Eve into sin by begetting distrust in the 
goodness of God. 

The occasion of this desert temptation was 
the extreme hunger of the Son of Man. It was 
when hungry that Esau sold his birthright. It 
was when hungry that Israel murmered against 
God. When hungry men have committed the 
most fearful crimes. When under the agoniz- 
ing pangs of extreme hunger, modest women 
have sold their purity for bread. Men often 
act as if they were to live by bread alone. 

This first great temptation which came to 
Christ consisted in the suggestion on the part 
of Satan, that our Saviour work a miracle -- 
change stone into bread — to satisfy His agoniz- 
ing hunger. This was, indeed, a plausable sug- 
gestion — it looked so reasonable and innocent. 
All temptations look plausible. The question at 
once arises, What evil could there have been 
in our Saviour 's\ changing stones into bread to 
satisfy His own hunger? In answering this 
question there are several things to be consid- 
ered. 

First : It is never right to do anything which 
the Devil suggests. His nature is so completely 
wicked that he will suggest no good thing. We 
are to obey the voice of God, and not the sugges- 
tions of the Devil. Men have always gotten into 
sin and trouble when they have listened to 
the voice of Satan. 

Second: Christ had come into the world to 
live under the ordinary laws and conditions 
under which others live. He had come to live 
with, and suffer for, men — to show us how to 
suffer and be strong. He had come to live with 
man under the ordinary laws of nature and 
providence. To have wrought a miracle to sup- 
ply His own needs would have removed Him 
from the conditions under which we live and 
suffer. He came to share human experience, 
that he might redeem us from all evil. 

Third: His superhuman and supernatural 
powers as the anointed Son of God were not 
bestowed upon Him by the Father for His own 
ease and safety and comfort in the world, but 
as His God-given equipment for the redemption 
of our race. This is a marvelous fact, that 
Jesus never wrought a miracle for Himself — 
never used His supernatural powers for selfish 
ends. He could have changed stones into bread 
to meet the demands of gnawing hunger, but 
He would not, because He had come to suffer 
with and for us. He chose to trust God his 
Father until bread came in the ordinary way. 
It is a matter of tremendous significance that 
Jesus refused bread until it came in the right 



way. Much of the world's sin and sorrow has 
come through man's attempts to get bread in 
the wrong way. 

Fourth: Jesus had a higher mission than 
changing stones into bread. Had Jesus used 
His powers to change stones into bread, all the 
world would have followed Him for the bread 
which perishes. Jesus came to give men the 
bread of life. What men most need is bread 
for the soul. Men have always been prone to 
fatten the body and starve the soul. What 
men need is pardon and cleansing, truth, love 
and life. These Jesus came to give in full 
measure. 

This first desert temptation was a disguised 
effort on the part of Satan to have our Saviour 
cast away His beautiful confidence in the or- 
dinary care and goodness of His Father, who 
has promised daily bread to all who walk in the 
path of duty. It is easy for good men to lose 
faith in God in times of extreme danger and 
want. Jesus came to teach men to trust God 
as a loving Father — to trust God in the dark, to 
trust God and do right when there is no cash 
in the bank and no meal in the barrel. He 
must, therefore, wait on God for his daily bread 
like other good men. This temptation was a 
disguised effort to have Jesus distrust God His 
Father. 

But it was more than a temptation to distrust 
God. It was a plausable effort to have Christ 
misuse His supernatural powers. He came into 
the world to be our Redeemer and Saviour. His 
miracle-working powers were bestowed upon 
Him for our redemption. He must not use this 
divine power but for human redemption. Jesus 
could only be our Saviour by using His divine 
powers unselfishly. 

Thus Jesus Christ is the Supreme, the Di- 
vine, the God-sent Redeemer and Saviour of our 
lost race. But there is a subordinate sense 
in which God wills that every man should be 
a redeemer and saviour by the full, glad, unsel- 
fish use of His divine and human powers for 
man. We become redeemers and saviours in a 
subordinate sense and degree by resisting temp- 
tation and the unselfish use of our powers in the 
service of others. The supreme test of char- 
acter is the use we make of our powers. 

God has anointed every man with a measure 
of power. The consecration of our natural pow- 
ers to God is repentance and conversion. The 
use of those consecrated powers is the sum to- 
tal of the Christian life. By the proper use of 
these powers we assist God in the world's sal- 
vation. Thus we become laborers together with 
God. What are our powers, the right use of 
which make us redeemers and saviours in our 
day and generation? 

You have voice. Are you using your voice 
for God ? John Wesley used his voice for God, 
and made England a new nation. Charles Wes- 
ley used his pen and voice for God, and has 
sung the wonders of redeeming love around 
the world. 

0, for a thousand tongues to sing 
My great Redeemer's praise; 

The glories of my God and King, 
The triumphs of His Grace. 

You have sociai Influence. How are you us- 
ing it? To amuse yourself and a few friends? 
To kill time? To gratify your vanity? 0, if 
our women would use their social influence for 
God ! If our women would bring to bear their 
social influence for the salvation of the lost, this 
would soon be a new world. In one town where 
I was pastor I saw a degraded drunkard saved 
by the social influence of the good women. The 
Masons had tried and failed. The preacher had 
tried and failed. The godly women went to 
him with tears in their eyes — they plead, they 
prayed, they won. And that man is prosper- 
ous and sober today, and has been sober these 
seven years. 

You have money. What are you doing with 
it? Money is power. Power for evil — yes. 
Power for good — yes. Make your money for 
God. Make your money send the Gospel to the 



ends of the earth. If you will use your money 
right, it will preach the gospel after you are 
dead and in heaven. 0, that men might see the 
power of money in the salvation of our world ! 
Many are ready and waiting to go to the ends ol 
the earth, but the moneyed men withhold theii 
cash. 

Education is power. Are you using your ed- 
ucation for Christ? Education will damn you 
unless you consecrate it to God. The man whc 
will withhold money when the poor are starv- 
ing is a base and cruel man. But the educated 
man who uses his education for selfish ends is 
even worse. Yes, we have power. God is test- 
ing us — but we are not using our power for 
God as we ought. The problem with the 
modern Church is to get it -to use all its powers 
for Christ. Then the Kingdom of God will 
come. Then the will of God will be done on 
earth. 

Wadesboro, N. C. 



WHY DO NOT WORKINGMEN ATTEND 
CHURCH? 

By Bishop Joseph F. Berry 

In one sense all industrious men are "work- 
ingmen. ' ' The physician is aworkingman. The 
minister is a workingman. Professional and 
business men are tremendous workers. They 
put in longer and more intense hours than the 
man who stands beside the spindle or the forge. 
I use the term "workingman," however, in its 
more popular sense. I speak of wage-earners — 
employees of mines, of factories and of mercan- 
tile establishments. Why do multitudes of such 
people absent themselves from the Lord's 
house? Why are so many of them indifferent 
to the gospel? Why are more of them not ac- 
tively engaged in Christian service as it is eon- 
ducted by the churches? These questions are 
being asked. They touch vital issues. They 
must be squarely faced. The answer has al- 
ready been too long delayed. 

Of course we all know that some of our most 
prosperous churches are made up almost exclu- 
sively of the laboring classes. Other churches 
have a large representation of laborers, and no 
element is more loyal or useful. At the same 
time we must admit that large numbers of wage- 
earners, especially those representing organized 
labor, are out of sympathy with the church. 
Some of the labor organizations hold their bus- 
iness meetings and their picnics on the Lord's 
Day. Many prominent labor leaders have no 
use for the church. What is the matter? 

The Prejudice of the Foreigner 

In the first place it should be remembered 
that many of the men who make up the mem- 
bership of these unions are from other lands, 
They were brought up under the state church 
system. They were baptized, confirmed anc 
married in the church. From the church they 
received little or no pastoral care, yet they 
were obliged by the government to pay their 
tax to support it. In Berlin, for instance, there 
are about forty churches. Philadelphia, witr. 
about the same population, has perhaps six hun- 
dred churches. One of the Berlin churches 
has a membership of 45,000. It is impossible 
for such a church to exercise any proper pas 
toral oversight. The multitude are away fron 
the church, and out of sympathy with it, thougl 
they are taxed to support it. The only time 
many of them come into direct contact with the 
church is when the tax-collector calls. A So- 
cialist leader in the Berlin Reichstag addressing 
a large company of worMngmen denounced th< 
church in severe terms, and his words were 
cheered to the echo, though every last one of his 
hearers was a duly baptized and confirmee 
member of the church. When such peoph 
come to this country they bring their preju 
dices with them. They know nothing of th< 
spirit of American Christianity. They imag 
ine the church here and yonder are the same 
So, taking advantage of their freedom fron 
state church taxation, they soon isolate them 



January 22, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



selves from all churches. This spirit of the 
foreign-born laborer has its influence upon all 
laborers. Professional demagogues see their op- 
portunity and fan these prejudices into a flame. 
This task is all the easier when capitalists of un- 
savory reputation are prominent in the church. 
A grievance against an employer who is promi- 
nent in the church is soon transformed into a 
grievance against the church itself. 

The Christian Spirit of the Lodge 

But there is another reason. Fraternal or- 
ganizations multiply. Their name is legion. 
Most of them have absorbed the humanitarian 
spirit of Christianity. In cases of sickness, ac- 
cident or death the "brothers" are on hand to 
do good Samaritan work. All conventionality 
and stiffness vanish behind the portals of the 
lodge. A free, easy, social time is had. The 
lodge takes precedence of the church. In many 
cases it becomes a substitute. "My lodge is 
good enough religion for me," said the man 
the other day, not remembering that the spirit 
of brotherhood as practiced in the lodge-room 
could have no existence if it were not for Chris- 
tianity. It is sometimes the case that even 
church members devote themselves to the lodge 
and merely attend their church. If, after serv- 
ing the lodge, they have a little time to give to 
church duties, well and good. Said a gentleman 

to me recently : " I went to the city of N , 

and the first thing I did was to present my 
church letter. After being formally received 
by the pastor, I passed down the aisle to my 
seat. I noticed in one of the pews a fine looking 
at the close of the service and welcomed me, 
man. Many members of the church came to me 
but this man passed out without as much as 

noticing me. The next week I entered the 

lodge. The day after, a gentleman came run- 
ning across the street through the mud to meet 
me. Introducing himself, he said, 'I saw you 
at lodge last night; I want to welcome you.' 
It was the same man whom I had noticed in the 
church, of which he was a prominent member. 
He never thought of giving me a welcome as a 
member of the church, but as a member of the 
lodge was prompt and profuse in his recog- 
nition." The influence exerted by the "lodge" 
is shared to even a larger extent by the "fed- 
erations" and "unions" and "knights" of 
this and "knights" of that among the 
laboring men. It is the fraternal organi- 
zation in competition with the c!r|rch. I 
was entertained at the home of a man who boast- 
ed that he belonged to six lodges. Now I belong 
to a lodge or two myself, but I submit that 
this friend belonged to several too many. 

The saloon is another tremendous factor in 
alienating people— especially working-people — 
from the house of God. The saloon is the dev- 
il's best ally. It has degraded, brutalized, 
stripped and wounded its victims until all de- 
sire for things noble and pure has died out. 
The man who is at home in the saloon is never 
at home in the church. He is against the 
church, first, last and all the time. Then re- 
member that the churches are everywhere rec- 
ognized as the special friends of temperance. 
They have denounced the saloons. They have 
advocated prohibition. They have said that li- 
quor drinking is a far-reaching evil, and liquor 
selling a diabolical crime. They have tried to 
win away from the gin-mill its besotted vic- 
tims, and to close it up by the authority of pro- 
hibitive laws. It has not been a difficult thing 
for the crafty saloon-keeper to persuade his pa- 
trons — especially his foreign-born patrons — 
that the church and prohibition means the same 
thing, and that ministers are in league to take 
away from the laboring man his much loved 
dram. It is war to the knife, and knife to the 
hilt, between the church and the saloon, and in 
some communities the latter appears to be get- 
ting a good deal the better of the battle. 

I have stated some reasons which are operat- 
ing outside the church to keep workingmen 
away. Now, are there reasons to be found with- 
in the church itself ? Let us see. 



Starch 

1. The drawing of social distinctions is one 
reason. I cannot agree with those who insist 
that fine church edifices, with their cathedral 
windows, glistening chandeliers, magnificent or- 
gan and costly music, keep people away in any 
considerable numbers. Working people go to 
magnificent theaters and art galleries, and some 
to gorgeous saloons. In these places they seem 
to feel quite at home. It is rather the social at- 
mosphere of the great church that is repelling. 
The place is chilly. The people remind one of 
the laundry — starchy and stiff. They seem ex- 
clusive. ' ' You cannot blame us for not wanting 
to greet people until we know who they are," 
said a gentleman to me a while ago. "I look 
upon the church a good deal as I do upon my 
home, ' ' he said. ' ' I would not want to give so- 
cial recognition to all kinds of people in my 
home, and I should not be expected to do so in 
church." What a distorted notion of the 
church of Jesus Christ. My frank friend no 
doubt expressed the secret sentiments of 
many others. But the church is not a home in 
the same sense in which he used the word, where 
the forms of social etiquette must be observed, 
but a democratic center where rich and poor 
meet upon common ground, and where the 
ragged drunkard and the pale-faced harlot, 
struggling to find a better life, will be warmly 
greeted and graciously helped. 

Cold 

2. Must not the pulpit bear some share of 
the responsibility ? In too many cases the gos- 
pel sermon has given place to the semi-secular 
lecture. Discussions of literature, of sociology, 
of politics and sensational comments on civic 
conditions — these will for a time stimulate suf- 
ficient public curiosity to fill the empty pews. 
But it will not last. After all, there is no 
substitute for the gospel message. It has a 
subtle magnetism which never wears out. What 
will draw like the cross of Calvary? The 
preacher who puts anything in its place is 
not wise. But the gospel can be preached in 
such a frigid and formal way as to lose all its 
attracting power. It must have variety in the 
method of presentation. It must fall from the 
lips of a man with intensity of conviction. 
It must aim at real human needs. It must 
pulsate with sympathy. It must catch fire. 
When the pulpit is on fire the people will come 
to see it burn. 

Carelessness 

3. Would not the church have more of the 
sort of people I am writing about if we would 
go after them? I do not know a pastor who 
does not want to see the empty pews of his 
church filled with all sorts of people from the 
neighborhood of his church. I do not believe 
there are many church members who would not 
be glad to see the people come in crowds. But 
the trouble is we do so little to show our con- 
cern. We do not give the unchurched to un- 
derstand that we really are anxious to have 
them come. Most pastors do their share in 
the quest for the indifferent. Occasionally a 
missionary worker or a deaconess is sent to can- 
vass the neighborhood. But a professional can- 
vasser can do little good. People resent that 
sort of thing. But there is a working force 
which is doing almost nothing. It is made 
up of the business and professional men and 
cultured Christian women of the church. If 
they would go to the people living up and 
down the street and urgently invite them to 
join them at church, they would feel honored 
by such recognition. Such an invitation would, 
in many cases, be accepted. How swiftly mis- 
conceptions would be removed and old preju- 
dices broken down. A new conception of the 
real heart of the church would be received, and 
the indifferent would flock to the sanctuary like 
' ' doves to their windows. ' ' The people in the 
pews even more than the preacher in the pul- 
pit are responsible for dwindling congrega- 
tions. 



The Evangelistic Spirit 

4. The presence of the genuine evangelis- 
tic spirit in the churches would also do won- 
ders. Show me a church where the Holy Ghost 
is poured out in pentecostal power and I will 
show you a church where the people are gath- 
ered together. Why are the churches of 
Wilkes-Barre and Steubenville and many oth- 
er cities and towns crowded to the doors just 
now? The reason is utterly plain. These 
communities have been stirred by great revivals 
of religion, and multitudes have been convert- 
ed. The rich and the poor have pressed their 
way through the throngs, and have been glad 
to find standing room in the churches and 
halls. Professional men and clerks and me- 
chanics and day laborers have sat side by side 
with bated breath and tear-dimmed eyes lis- 
tening to the gospel call. How the devil of caste 
has been thrown down ! How the Holy Spirit 
has leveled Tip and leveled down ! How the old 
weather-beaten conundrum, "How shall we 
reach the masses?" has been forgotten! If a 
mighty tidal wave of saving power could but 
sweep through the city churches and through 
the village churches, and through the country 
churches, what a transformation would be 
wrought! How the empty seats in the sanc- 
tuary would fill up, and how every Christly 
cause would instantly leap forward to success ! 

This burning, throbbing, awful problem is 
on our hands. What shall we do with it? 
What shall we do, we of the churches? Some- 
thing ought to be done. Something must be 
done. And that something must be done with- 
out delay. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



YUN CHI HO'S PRISON LIFE 

Eev. W. A. Wilson 

' ' As may be remembered, Baron Yun Chi Ho, 
the leading figure in the conspiracy case, was 
convicted last month at the Supreme Court of 
attempted assassination of Count Terauchi, the 
Governor-General, and sentenced to six years' 
penal servitude, with five of his associates. Noth- 
ing has since been heard of him save that he is 
serving his term at the Taiku prison. Friends 
will be pleased to learn from the Chosen Inim- 
po, a Japanese paper published at Taiku, some- 
thing about his daily life in prison. 

"According to the paper, Baron Yun seems 
to have entirely resigned himself to his fate 
since the appeal of himself and his five associ- 
ates was dismissed by the Supreme Court. He 
conducts himself with calm dignity and faith- 
fully obeys the prison rules. He has recently 
been removed from the room hitherto occupied 
by him alone to another, where he is now living 
with three Japanese convicts. In conformity 
with prison regulations, he has had his hair cut 
short ; but he is not yet attired in convict garb, 
being still allowed to wear the clothes sent him 
by his family. No labor is as yet imposed on 
him, but it is said he will shortly be ordered to 
take up netmaking. 

"At present Baron Yun, as do other prison- 
ers, rises at six o'clock in the evening. Every 
day he is allowed to take exercise for one hour, 
and the rest of the time he devotes himself to 
reading. He was allowed to retain possession 
of several books, including a few written in 
English ; but the Bible is his constant compan- 
ion. In the room Baron Yun keeps silent all 
day and very seldom speaks to his fellow pris- 
oners. Out of respect to his social standing, 
Baron Yun is granted special treatment, being 
allowed to take meals specially prepared for 
him at his own expense. A very concise diary 
is being kept by him since his imprisonment 
in the Taiku prison. His health remains very 
good, and his behavior is commendable." 



"Are you the same man who ate my mince 
pie last week?" 

"No, mum. I'll never be th' same man 
again ! ' ' — New York Mail. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE January 22, 1914 



Page Six 



» ■ » 

From the Field 

. }. «»«.«—....». .....»».«.. 

Notes and Personals 

— Rev. J. B. Hyder, supply on Spring Creek 
circuit, reports that he has been very kindly re- 
ceived, and that he finds a goodly number of 
loyal people, giving hope of a successful year. 

—Rev. A. R. Bell, pastor of Walnut Street 
and Caraway Memorial, is taking hold of his 
work in a wise and intelligent way. His preach- 
ing is impressing the people and we look for 
good results. 

— Rev. J. T. Ratledge, the new pastor at Ad- 
vance, writes that they are very pleasantly 
domiciled, having met with a kind reception 
and the kindness continues in evidence. The 
field is a promising one, the community grow- 
ing and everything is promising. 

— Major W. A. Conley, a prominent citizen 
of Marion and a member of the Methodist 
church, passed away at his home in that place 
on last Saturday night. The funeral services 
were conducted from the Methodist church on 
Sunday afternoon. 

— We regret to learn that a fire in Belmont 
Park, Charlotte, last week destroyed four resi- 
dences, including the parsonage occupied by 
Rev. J. H. Bradley, pastor of the church at Bel- 
mont Park. We have not learned the extent 
of the loss either to Brother Bradley or the 
congregation at this writing. 

— Rev. W. L. Hutchins, pastor of our Burk- 
head Institutional church, Winston-Salem, 
makes a very hopeful report of things there. 
His board very generously increased his salary 
and everything is looking up. This church oc- 
cupies a field presenting many difficulties, at 
the same time being one of great opportunity. 

— Mr. A. J. Payne, for many years a mem- 
ber of our church in Hickory, passed away 
suddenly at his home in that place on the night 
of the 13th. He worked all day and while 
standing before the fire at his home suddenly 
dropped dead. He leaves a widow and six chil- 
dren, who have the sympathy of many friends. 

— A special from Linwood, dated January 
13th, says : — The majority of our people attend- 
ed the illustrated pictures of the life of Christ 
shown in our school auditorium last Monday 
night, January 8th. These pictures were shown 
by our pastor, Rev. W. F. Elliott, and proved to 
be very beneficial to the community. 

— The officers and teachers of the Methodist 
Sunday school met Friday night at the home of 
Mr. George L. Hackney, superintendent, for 
their annual meeting. The Sunday school has 
enjoyed the very best year in its history and 
is getting better every Sunday. The average 
attendance in 1913 was 248. After the business 
meeting, which was full of interest, there was a 
delightful musical program and refreshments 
were served. — Lexington Dispatch. 

— We note that Mr. J. D. Bivens, who, for 
many years, has been the owner and editor of 
the Albemarle Enterprise, has sold the paper 
to Mr. W. D. Little, of Oklahoma City, a native 
however, of this state. Mr. Bivens has made 
one of the best country newspapers in the 
state, and we shall miss him. We trust the 
paper under the new management will main- 
tain its former high standard. 

— Rev. Joseph Fry reports a kind and cordial 
reception by the people of Jonathan circuit. He 
begins his second year with encouragement on 
all hands. On Monday night, the 5th of Jan- 
uary, the congregation at Shady Grove gave the 
pastor and family a generous pounding, and 
other things have been coming in from other 
churches. Brother Fry says he is glad to be 
"in this garden spot in the most picturesque 
part of Haywood county." 

— By an oversight we failed to note at the 
proper time the death of Mrs. Caroline Koch- 
titzky, which occurred at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. W. E. Merritt, in Mount Airy, 



December 18th. Mrs. Kochtitzky was the moth- 
er of Mr. E. H. Kochtitzky, a prominent lay- 
man of our church in Mount Airy, also of Mr. 
O. W. Kochtitzky, of Monroe. She was a 
good woman and all her life of 81 years had 
striven to do right. She was blessed in her 
children who have all reflected credit upon a 
good mother. 

— Rev. Frank Siler, our Field Secretary of 
Missions, is making long and quick strides as 
usual and his work is already telling. Last 
week he visited the churches in Winston-Salem 
and joined hands with the pastors for a for- 
ward movement on all lines. We are glad to 
see him working on broader lines that look to 
taking care of the base of supply as well as the 
firing line. The debt on two local churches 
which has been dragging and causing discour- 
agement it is hoped will be wiped out as the 
result of last week's work. 

— The news of increased support of our pas- 
tors comes from many quarters. This is cheer- 
ing and we believe God's blessing will rest upon 
churches and official boards where this is taking 
place. Our ministry is as free from the merce- 
nary spirit as can be found in the world, but 
many of our pastors are not provided for as 
they should be. Let stewards who are charged 
with the responsibility of providing means of 
support be broad and liberal in their views and 
better things will come to preacher and people. 

—Rev. A. W. Plyler, pastor of the Metho- 
dist church, preached a very interesting sermon 
Sunday night on "Shams." He paid his re- 
spects to shams of all kinds, including jham 
beauty, as evidenced by paints, powders, etc.. 
on the part of the ladies and dyed hair and 
whiskers on the part of widowers and elderly 
gentlemen, sham learning as evidenced by emp- 
ty degrees, conferred by nominal colleges with 
high school curriculums, or by correspondence 
schools, sham piety, etc. The sermon was un- 
usually instructive and entertaining. — Lexing- 
ton Dispatch. 

— A cheering note comes from Mooresville by 
way of the Statesville Landmark. It says 
that the members of Triplett church last Sun- 
day decided to support a resident mission- 
ary in China at the cost of $100. In addi- 
tion to this amount the church will pay near- 
ly this amount into the regular Conference 
missionary fund. This is one of the churches 
in Brother Myer's charge and we are glad to 
note this among many evidences that Brother 
Myers is leading his people wisely. Many other 
country churches could do likewise and would 
be blessed in doing so. 

— The old circuit parsonage at Mt. Airy, 
which was in reality the old station parsonage, 
was sold recently to Mr. U. L. Robinson, and 
the News-Leader says this will insure the be- 
ginning of work on a new church in North 
Mount Airy. The plan is to build a parsonage 
also on the same lot to be occupied by the pastor 
of the Mount Airy circuit. We are glad to note 
this evidence of the growth of Mount Airy 
Methodism. The editor of the Advocate watch- 
es the progress of our church in this beautiful 
mountain city with no little interest. Twenty 
years ago he assisted the leaders of the church 
at that time in planning to break dirt for the 
erection of a church on a plan which some 
thought foolishly extravagant. Today it is 
not quite roomy enough for the best accomoda- 
tion of the great congregation which has de- 
veloped during the years. 



THE CONFERENCE MINUTES 

The minutes are going out to the preachers 
this week. If any do not receive them at once 
let them be patient a few days as it takes time 
to pack and ship out 5,000 books. While there 
has been a little delay which we regret there 
will be no room for complaint as to the quality 
of the work. It is a good job and reflects great 
credit upon our Advocate Press. 

By some means the Walkertown charge and 
the name of Rev. O. J. Jones were overlooked in 



the list of appointments, and was not discov- 
ered till too late to correct. Of course this 
is much regretted, but it seems impossible to 
avoid some such errors. 



Jackson Hill 

Rev. C. C. Williams, the pastor, writes: 
"We have been very kindly received by the 
good people of Jackson Hill charge. Have 
been pounded by the members of Jackson Hill 
church. We are praying for and expecting 
a good year every way." 



Belmont Park, Charlotte 

Rev. J. H. Bradley, pastor, writes: — "Our 
parsonage and a number of other buildings 
were destroyed by fire Monday. 

We saved most of parsonage furniture and 
most of my books. Our largest personal loss was 
in clothing, books, tableware and provisions. 

The house was a total loss. Being so close 
to an old store we could not get insurance that 
we could afford to carry. 

We are planning to rebuild at once a first- 
class parsonage of brick, with slate roof. 



Cherryville 

A large crowd of Cherryville Methodists be- 
sieged the parsonage Friday night and left us 
rejoicing over one of the nicest poundings we 
have ever seen. Our large dining room table 
was loaded with all manner of edibles and dain- 
ties. Bethlehem had given us a most delight- 
ful pounding during the holidays. We are ex- 
ceedingly grateful for these tokens of apprecia- 
tion which so many of our friends have brought 
or sent during the past few weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Usry. 



Christmas at Ramseur Parsonage 

Our Christmas gifts at the Ramseur par- 
sonage from the Ramseur people were Tnany, 
solid and substantial, consisting of meats, fruits, 
and groceries galore, and reminding us of that 
love that never faileth. We are thankful ex- 
ceedingly. The outlook for 1914 is the finest 
ever. 

The one new subscriber and three renewals 
enclosed will remind you that we are at work 
for the Advocate. O. P. Ader. 



Jackson Hill 

We have just moved to the parsonage at 
Jackson Hill. On our arrival we found every 
thing in good shape for the pastor and his 
family. The dining room table was just loaded 
down with packages of good things — such as a 
pastor and his family needs. We find ourselves 
in the midst of a generous people. They have 
received us royally. May the Lord richly re- 
ward them for their kindnesses to us and make 
us a blessing to them. Very truly yours, 

C. C. Williams. 



Walnut Circuit 

We have been serving the Walnut charge 
just a month and a few days. We arrived 
here the 12th of December. The people gave 
us a cordial welcome. As there is no parson- 
age connected with this charge we had to rent 
a house, but the good people of Walnut and 
vicinity relieved us of having to pay the rent. 
And in addition to paying the house rent, thev 
bought for us such furniture as we needed. 
We are now very confortably situated. And 
in addition to all of this, a few days ago when 
the wind was blowing and the snow was fall- 
ing, a crowd of young ladies and others came 
with a great big pounding, and since then good 
things in the way of eatables have been coming 
in continuously. We consider these things tok- 
ens of their friendship and love for us and hope 
and pray that we can in return be of great 
service to these people. 

There are five preaching appointments on 



January 22, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



this charge — two organized churches and three 
mission points. So far we have made one round. 
At every place things have been favorable, so 
with the invigorating mountain air and other 
encouraging features, and above all the aid of 
the Lord, we see no reason why we shouldn't 
have a good year. Z. V. Johnston. 



Two Educational Conferences 

The Executive Committee of the Board of 
Education has aranged for two educational con- 
ferences during the year. The first is to be held 
February 26 and 27 at Nashville; the second, 
August 4-7 at the Southern Assembly on Juna- 
luska Lake. The program for the February 
Conference will be completed and published in 
a few days. While this program contemplates 
specially the presence of the presidents and 
principals of our colleges and schools and their 
active participation in the discussions, confer- 
ence secretaries of education, representatives 
of Conference Boards, Editors of our church 
papers, pastors, and all others interested in 
the educational work of our church are cordial- 
ly invited to attend and to take part in the 
Conference. 

On account of the Intedominational Bible 
Conference being in session at Nashville at that 
time, special rates are granted by the railroads. 
"Within the state of Tennessee, round trips are 
sold for one fare plus 25c; without the state, 
round trips for one and one-half fare ; 

It is the plan of the Board to make the Aug- 
ust Conference a great inspirational education- 
al meeting. Further information concerning 
plans and the program will be made public 
later. Stonewall Anderson. 



Weaver College Notes 

Weaver College opens the spring term with 
a thirty per cent increase in attendance. The 
outlook for this school was never so promising. 
Every available room in the dormitory has 
been filled and it is a great problem to provide 
proper accomodation for those who continue to 
come in for the term which begins today. 

The erection of three new dormitories is an 
immediate duty of the church. We can build 
and equip a dormitory for fifty boys or girls 
at a total cost of $12,500.00. In these dormi- 
tories the student can be cared for at ten dol- 
lars per month. We stand ready to assure 
any Methodist who will provide one of these 
homes that we can fill it to the doors by the 
next session of the school. No finer contribu- 
tion could be made to the Methodism of the 
state. These mountains are full of the very 
finest raw material in the way of young men 
and young women. We have with us here a 
magnificent class of young men who are prepar- 
ing for the ministry of the church. With the 
beginning of this term a course in Pedagogv 
will be given by Mrs. Bertha Payne Newell, 
formerly of the School of Education, Univer- 
sity of Chicago. A number of young people 
have entered for this course. We hope to send 
a stream of preachers and teachers trained for 
the. most efficient service into the pulpits and 
schools of the state. 

Our faculty is every thing we could ask for. 
The problem of the church college is to hold 
such capable teachers while the state clamors 
for strong men and women for the public school 
service, and to secure them offer salaries much 
higher- than we can afford to pay. To meet 
this difficulty the trustees have employed Dr. 
E. A. Child as financial agent for the college 
and he is now in the field collecting an endow- 
ment fund. Dr. Child has been financial agent 
of Wofford and Lander Colleges for several 
years and has secured for these schools far 
larger sums than the authorities had thought 
possible. After a careful survey of all the 
conditions he declares that Weaver College will 
make a stronger appeal than any school for 
which he has worked. He hopes to secure $50,- 
000.00 within the year. 



Mr. Edward Skinner, of Seattle, Washing- 
ton, an alumnus of the college, was a visitor 
among us during the' holidays. While here he 
purchased the Baird land which lies just south 
of the college campus and presented it to the 
school. This will be laid off as a park and 
Mr. C. R. Moore, of Weaverville, has kindly 
offered to build a beautiful fountain in the cen- 
ter of this park just as soon as water works 
are installed in the town. The trustees have 
also contracted for several acres of land imme- 
diately in front of the college. The addition 
of this property will give us by far the most 
beautiful campus in the state. W. A. Newell. 



South Main, Salisbury 

I have been waiting for the new men on 
their new charges to get in their reports of 
their "kind receptions" and "generous pound- 
ings," etc., before I would tell my little sto- 
ry. I was returned to South Main Street for 
my fourth year. We have not received the 
' ' generous pounding ' ' since Conference in the 
way that poundings tisually come, but the 
people have been very good to us, and in a 
very substantial way we have been pounded 
both before and since Conference. Just before 
we went to Conference our people gave us a 
nice suit of clothes, a hat and overcoat. They 
also gave Mrs. Stamper a purse, the whole 
amounting to $102.20. This was all over and 
above the salary which was paid in full. 

Since Conference the stewards have raised 
the salary from $800 to $900 and in addition 
to this they adopted the budget system and 
took off the pastor's hands that laborious task 
of tramping the streets collecting the Confer- 
ence collections, and last, but not least, they 
pay the pastor his money the first day of ev- 
ery month and there is no waiting for his 
check, and in addition to all this we are build- 
ing a nice, up-to-date Sunday school room at 
a cost of $3,000, which we hope to have com- 
plete by March 15th. The building is a, nice 
brick structure and so arranged that we can 
throw the two auditoriums into ,one, giving 
us a seating capacity of perhaps 900 or 1,000. 
We will entertain the District Conference this 
year, and here and now we extend to the editor 
a cordial invitation to be present. The work 
seems to be hopeful. We are preaching to 
some of the largest congregations since Con- 
ference that we have had since we have been 
on the work, and we ask the readers of the 
Advocate to pray for us that this may be the 
best year of our stay with this good, loyal 
people. 

Mr. Editor, come to see us any time you 
can do so. 

Yours for a thousand new subscribers, 

Gilbert A. Stamper. 



Wilkes Circuit 

I have made my first trip to each of my 
appointments and I am pleased with the pros- 
pects of a good year. I have met with kind- 
hearted folks everywhere I have been. I have 
already learned that the people on this work 
know how to shake hands. There has been in- 
spiration in almost every hand-shake I have 
had. Not only do these people know how to 
shake hands, but they know also how to wel- 
come their preacher. They are ready to ren- 
der any service at home, at church or anywhere. 
This makes the work desirable and makes 
the preacher and family feel at home. 

The work seems a bit heavy, but Ood has 
said, "Go, and I will go with thee," so I 
am depending on Him for help and power. 

On December 27, 1913. death called at the 
home of brother J. H. Hall and claimed him 
as his own. Brother Hall had been suffering 
with bronchitis for more than six months, which 
resulted in his death. He joined the M. E. 
Church, South, about fifty years ago, and lived 
cru« to his vows until God called.him ..tome. 
He was one of the stewards of this circAii and 



also the strongest member of one of the church- 
es on this work. His presence will be missed 
in the church as well as in the home. There 
is a vacancy in the home, where his widow and 
daughter live, that can never be filled, but 
there is a place in heaven which is filled now 
that has previously been vacant. During the 
fifty years of his Christian life he has shown 
all who knew him how a Christian can live. 
During his illness he showed how a Christian 
can endure pain, and finally, he showed how 
a Christian can die. He lived to be nearly 
sixty-eight years old and it is said he never 
had an enemy. 

To the bereaved wife, the two daughters 
and the grandchildren we extend our sympathy 
and commend them to God, who can wipe away 
their tears and remove their sorrows. 

On December 28, 1913, the death angel called 
also at the home of brother J. H. Pennal and 
claimed his little three-year-old boy. Little 
Stuart was a noble child and the baby boy. He 
told me only two weeks before he died he was 
my little Methodist preacher. He was well 
and apparently in fine health then, but when I 
went to fill my appointment on fourth Sunday 
at Union near Brother Pennel's home, I 
learned that little Stuart had a very severe 
ease of membranous croup. After service I 
went down to see him and found that from 
appearance my "little Methodist preacher" 
could not live very long. God relieved his 
suffering and carried him home to glory. I 
long to take him into my arms up there and 
hear him tell me once more he is my little 
preacher. He made an impression on me that 
no other child has made, and when I looked 
into his face while he sat on his mother's lap 
struggling for breath, my heart went up to 
God for his relief. I realized more fully that 
"in the midst of life we are in death." 

Little Stuart will be missed but there is con- 
solation in this : "Of such is the Kingdom of 
Heaven." To the bereaved ones I would 
say, grieve not for Stuart for the angels are 
caring for him now. He is safe in the arms 
of Jesus. O. C. Fortenberry, Pastor. 

Moravian Falls, N. C. 



Trinity College Notes 

Reverend R. C. Craven, pastor of Trinity 
church in Durham, has notified President Few 
that his church has undertaken to pay the 
way through Trinity College of a worthy young 
preacher who could not otherwise get an edu- 
cation. A young man was named, and he has 
already availed himself of the opportunity. 

For a number of years Reverend A. D. Betts, 
of Greensboro, has given annually a sum of 
money to be used as a loan fund at Trinity Col- 
lege. The College is again placed under obli- 
gations to him for a contribution to this fund. 

There frequently come to the College re- 
quests from young preachers to furnish a list 
of books on theological subjects. To meet this 
demand Bishop J. C. Kilgo and Dr. F. N. Par- 
ker were asked to prepare such a list. This 
list has been published in pamplet form and 
anyone desiring to secure a copy may do so 
making application to the College. In view of 
the startling statistics lately published as to 
church membership and church attendance on 
the part of students of some of the larger Amer- 
ican Colleges, Reverend C. B. Culbreth, pas- 
tor of Mangum Street Church in Durham, has 
carefully collected the figures for this genera- 
tion of students of Trinity College. Mr. Cul- 
breth says that of the Freshman class 87 per 
cent, are church members and 91 per cent, at- 
tend church; of the Sophomores, 94 per cent, 
are church members and 98 per cent, attend 
church ; of the Juniors, 78 per cent, are church 
members and 94 per cent attend church ; of the 
Seniors, 79 per cent, are church members and 
80 per cent, attend church ; of the whole stu- 
dent body, 90 per cent, are church members 
and 96 per cent, attend church. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 22, 1914 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mr*, w. R. Harris, Asheville, N. 0. 



GOD'S BEST 

God has His best things for the few 
That dare to stand the test, 

God has His second choice for those 
Who will not have His best. 

It is not always open ill 
That risks the promised rest; 

The better often is the foe 
That keeps us from the best. 

There's scarcely one but vaguely wants 
In some way to £>e blessed; 

'Tis not Thy blessrng, Cord, Task: 
I want the very best. 

I want in this short life of mine, 
As much as can be pressed 

Of service true for God and man; 
Help me to be my best. 

I want among the victor throng 
To have my name confessed; 

And hear my Master say at last: 
"Well done; you did your best." 

— Selected. 



A number of auxiliaries have re- 
sponded to the request that a list of 
the officers for 1914 be sent to the 
Superintendent of Publicity, so that a 
mailing list may be prepared for the 
Conference officers, but there are still 
a large number to hear from. It will 
be a great favor if you will attend to 
this at once, as we are anxious to 
get the names of the officers to the 
corresponding Conference officers, so 
they may know to whom the literature 
must be sent. Send a card with this 
information to rs. W. R. Harris, 48 
North French Broad Avenue, Asheville, 
N. C, at once. Let me urge this mat- 
ter, as it is very necessary. 



Of +he many live Junior Missionary 
Societies in the W. N. C. Conference 
there are none more fully awake to 
the responsibility and importance of 
this work than the Chestnut Street 
Light Bearers, of Asheville. The en- 
thusiasm of their untiring leader, Miss 
Amy Hackney, has become contagious 
and each little worker in this band 
is putting forth her best efforts for 
success. 

Once a year it is their custom to 
hold an open meeting to which the 
older people and everybody interested 
in missions is invited. On the night 
of the second Sunday in December 
they gave a most splendid program and 
were greeted with a large, apprecia- 
tive audience. The feature of this en- 
tertainment was a pleasing exercise, 
"The Sunbonnet Babies," presented by 
the cradle roll. Each of the seven 
days of the week was represented by 
two little girls, and each of them per- 
formed her part well. A recitation 
descriptive of each day was recited 
by Miss Carrie Lee Weaver. 

Another exercise proving to be most 
entertaining was the "Missionary Tel- 
ephone" which had ^een procured bv 
the leader so that we might hear from 
the mission fields in which we are 
so much interested. Messages came 
from Brevard School, Brazil, China and 
.Tapan. Of course the children en.ioyed 
hearing from these places and enjoyed 
singing in the "funnel" so those far 
away might hear them. 

A nice collection was raised and 
applied to the missionary pledge. 



THE PASSING OF THE YEAR 

Life is an irrevocable thing. We 
have just finished an irrevocable year. 
As we look back upon it, every thought 
and word and act is there in its place, 
There are all the Sabbaths in their 
places and all the well-spent or ill-spent 
days between. There is every sin and 
every wish and every look still in its 
own exact surroundings, each under 
its own day of the month, at the pre- 
cise day of the month it happened. 
We are leaving it all at twelve o'clock 



tonight. But remember, we are leaving 
it exactly as it stands; not a single 
hour of it can be changed now, no 
smallest wish can be recalled, no angry 
word taken back. It is fixed, steadfast, 
irrevocable — stereotyped forever on the 
past plates of eternity. — Henry Drum- 
mondi. 



One of the finest new year's vows 
was that made by Secretary of State 
William Jennings Bryan in a recent 
issue of his paper, "The Commoner:" 
"As life is measured by what we put 
into the world, I shall make this year 
more valuable than any previous one 
by crowding more service into it." 
Will not numbers of our missionary 
workers join Mr. Bryan in this splen- 
did resolution? 



WOMEN AND THE MINISTRY 

Surely it cannot be too strongly em- 
phasized that a minister ok tne gos- 
pel should be the outcome of careful 
thought and of agonizing prayer. He 
should be the product of the spiritual 
forces of the churches of Christ. In 
the history of God's revelation of Him- 
self to men throughout the history 
of the Christian church, the men whom 
God has used most effectively have 
been the direct outcome of faith and 
prayer. As a rule this faith and pray- 
er have found embodiment in the heart 
and life of some good woman. It was 
the seed of the woman that should 
bruise the serpents's head; it was a 
woman's faith and courage that saved 
Moses alive against the command of 
the king. It was in answer to a 
woman's earnest prayer that God sent 
Samuel to drive back <he darkness of 
the time of the Judges and to prepare 
the way for the glorious day of King 
David. When the fulness of time was 
come and God would incarnate Him- 
self in our human race for its redemp- 
tion; it was to a woman He came 
with the salutation, "Blessed art thou 
among Women," and it was a woman 
who responded to the call in those 
wonderful words, "Behold the hand- 
maid of the Lord." 

When the great apostle to the Gen- 
tiles had to choose a helper for his 
world-wide task, he selected a young 
man in whom was an unfeigned faith, 
which dwelt first in his grandmother 
Lois and in his mother Eunice. If we 
let our minds run through the cen- 
turies since, the same grrat truth 
stands out so clearly that he who runs 
may read it. 

Back of Augustine, the theologian of 
the Catholic church, are the earnest, 
persistent prayers of Monica. Ansgar, 
the pioneer missionary to Scandanavia, 
lost his mother before he was five 
years of age, but so indelibly had she 
stamped the impress of her heart and 
life upon him that in his call to the 
mission field he thought he saw his 
mother beckoning him on to that life 
of service which really laid a nation 
at the feet of Jesus. The mother of 
Zeigenbald, the first of our Protestant 
missionaries, lay dying. Around her 
were gathered her weeping children. 
"My dear children," said she, "I am 
leaving you a great treasure, a very 
great treasure." The oldest daughter 
said in surprise: "A treasure, dear 
mother! Where is that treasure?" 
"Seek it In the Bible," said the dying 
woman. "I have watered its every 
page with my tears." It was in trying 
to follow these words of his mother 
that Ziegenbald was led to dedicate 
his life to missions. And so if we go 
on to examine the case of John Wes- 
ley, we find back of him Susanna 
Wesley. Back of Charles H. Spurgeon 
was a mother of whom he said later 
in life, "I cannot tell how much I 
owe to the solemn words of my good 
mother." He then speaks of his 
mother's prayers for him, and adds: 



"Some of the words of that prayer 
we shall never forget even when our 
hair is gray." 

Is not this enough to show that 
is is God's purpose that woman's faith 
and prayer shall have a large place 
in producing the men Who are to lay 
the world at Jesus' feet? It is with 
these thoughts in our minds that we 
would call upon the women of our 
churches that when they are planning 
their work in and for the propagation 
of the kingdom of God in the earth, 
they arrange to give some time, 
thought, prayer and sacrifice to the 
matter of producing men. — W. R. Cul- 
lom, in Biblical Recorder. 



WHY EVERY CHURCH NEEDS THE 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY OR- 
GANIZATIONS 

In studying the relation of the mis- 
sionary societies to the church let 
us think for a few minutes about the 
church itself. This is an age in which 
people are so busy that they have no 
time for serious thought. They al- 
most forget God. Every one looks 
out for self first, and usually there 
is very little time left for helping 
some one else; hence our religious 
duties are sadly neglected. We expect 
no better of the worldly man, but 
what about the Christian? Surely he 
should place his duty to God above 
everything else. 

Every one respects Christianity and 
feels that the person who trusts in 
God is bound to succeed. A splendid 
opportunity is this for the church 
to carry on her work of evangelizing 
the world — the work that the Lord 
t psus Christ began while He was on 
the earth, a work that he loved, the 
work that He commanded us to do 
when He went back to His Father. 
The question for us to decide is, are 
we doing our part of this great work. 
Are your doing your part? Am" I do- 
ing my part? If not, what is the 
reason? Why do we not get to work? 
We cannot say we do not know what 
to do, or rather we would be ashamed 
to say so, for Christ has taught us 
plainly, both by example and precept. 
One of our greatest stumbling blocks 
is lack of knowledge concerning our 
work. There are numbers of members 
in our churches who are entirely ig- 
norant of their own denomination. 
They know nothing of the larger or- 
ganizations in their church, how can 
we expect them to understand when 
we talk of the smaller? They do not 
realize this is a day in which every- 
thing is carefully and systematically 
planned. That then is the main reason 
why a churc needs the women's or- 
ganizations. They are a part of the 
church, yes, a real necehsity. No 
church is complete without its mis- 
sionary societies. Do you think a 
church needs a Sunday school? Why 
certainly. No one would dare dis- 
pute that fact, therefore we all agree 
that it needs one or more missionary 
societies for they are just as impor- 
tant as the Sunday school. Let us 
think of the church as a tree, the 
branches representing the different 
phases of work such as the Laymen's 
Missionary Movement, prayer meeting, 
missionary societies, etc. Can you 
recall how a one-sided tree looks. One 
with fairly well proportioned branches 
on one side and none on the other? 
It looks very odd and we are force- 
fully reminded of its lost usefulness 
and of the beautiful tree it might 
have been. The comparison is easy. 
A church with no missionary society 
is a one-sided church. It is greatly 
lacking in material for fulfilling its 
mission. 

Since it is evident, then, that a 
church is incomplete without the mis- 
sionary societies, let us consider brief- 
ly how they can aid in its develop- 
ment. In the first place they give 
the women and children something to 
do. In a real live society there is a 
great deal of work and planning to 
be done. I suspect the most of us 



have attended some meetings that 
were uninteresting. The president 
was not familiar enough with the pro- 
gram to make any comments. Those 
who read pieces received them, per- 
haps, just before the meeting opened, 
and of course could not read them with 
any enthusiasm or spirit, so they did 
not prove interesting to the listener, 
rt will take only a few meetings of 
this kind to kill a society. There 
must be time and thought given to 
the preparation beforehand or the 
meeting will be lost. The members 
will go away feeling that they have 
gained nothing. 

Some people have the erroneous 
idea that a missionary society calls 
for money, nothing. more. Such peo- 
ple need waking up to theii responsi- 
bility. As for giving, surely that is 
a part of the work. The Lord wants 
us to give as He has prospered us, 
and it is our duty as well as privilege 
to do so. As a general thing, mission- 
ary societies will increase the contri- 
butions of the church. 

These societies are an encourage- 
ment to the pastor. They are a proof 
to him that he has a working churcn, 
an interested church, on^ thai has 
a purpose and is putting forth every 
effort to live up to that purpose. He 
comes in close contact with his mem- 
bers. 

Every Woman's Missionary Society 
should consider herself the mother of 
a younger society and get the children 
interested. There is no more impor- 
tant work than training the children. 
Give them something to do, and this 
is the best place to find something 
worth while. 

Since we see, then, that by working 
in these Woman's Missionary Societies 
each has found a work to do, it be- 
hooves us to be up and doing. Spend 
no more time in idleness. This is a 
small thing for us to do when com- 
pared with what our blessed Savior 
has done for us. Let us pray for our 
woman's work and try to accomplish 
greater things for Him. — Miss Bertha 
Newton, in Biblical Recorder. 



WHAT THE BIBLE MEANS TO ME 

The opinion of the Bible was bred 
in me, not only by the teaching of 
my home when I was a boy, but also 
by every turn and experience of my 
life, the nature of God, and tho spir- 
itual nature and needs of men. It is the 
only guide of life which really leads the 
spirit in the way of peace and salva- 
tion. If men could but be made to 
know it intimately and for what it 
really is, we should have secured both 
individual and social regeneration. — 
Woodrow Wilson, in Daily Bible. 



The Gideons have placed 189,930 
Bibles in hotels of the United States. 
California has 34,052 of those. Ohio, 
Iowa and Texas follow in the order 
named. The suggestion that Gideons 
mark their readings, favorite verses 
and chapters when reading Gideon 
Bibles in hotels for the guidance and 
edification of others is capital. 



CORONATION PIN 

A pin with emblems signifying the 
purpose of our Women's Missionary 
organizations to make our Lord Je- 
sus King of kings has been adopted 
by both the Council of Women for 
Home Missions land the Federation 
of Women's Foreign Mission Boards. 
It is known as the Coronation Pin 
and can be bought from Miss Grace 
Walker, 600 Lexington Avenue, New 
York, price $1.75. One hundred pins 
can be secured for $30 if bought in 
a lot. 

Claude Robeson 

ORGAN RECITALS 
New Organs Opened 

Teacher of Organ, Greensboro College 

for Women; Organist and Choirmaster 

West Market St. M. B. Church, Organist 

and Director Temple Emanuel. Address 

Greensboro College, Greensboro, N. C. 



January 22, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Epworth League Department 

Conducted by Miss A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. C. 



MRS. BROWN RESIGNS 

We have just received a card from 
Mrs. Brown, our Junior Superinten- 
dent, saying that they have recently 
moved to Chester, S. C, and for that 
reason she will have to resign her 
office as Junior Superintendent of the 
Western North Carolina League Con- 
ference. She asks us to express her 
appreciation for the help that she has 
received from the Leaguers, and to 
express her regret that she has to 
leave us. 

We are certainly sorry to lose 
Mrs. Brown from our League Cabinet. 
We feel that we have lost one of our 
most valuable officers. We appreciate 
what Mrs. Brown has done for the 
Junior League while she has been our 
Junior Superintendent, and know that 
all the Junior Leaguers, as well as 
the Senior Leaguers, will be sorry to 
give her up. We wish to extend to 
her our best wishes for a prosperous 
new year, and hope that she will be 
pleased with her new home. We wish 
to congratulate the South Carolina 
Leaguers in gaining such an enthusi- 
astic Leaguer. 



ed with the responsibility of taking 
the initiative in organizing an Bp- 
worth League. Any member of the 
congregation can move in the matter. 
And the pastor is not given authority 
to declare a League suspended or dis- 
banded." 

We do not see how any pastor can 
just completely everlook the League 
matter the way some of them do. 



The following editorial was clipped 
from the Florida Advocate: 

"We have a basket (not a waste 
basket) of good things from our 
Leaguers over the State, which we 
will publish as soon as possible. We 
beg your indulgence, as our work was 
mostly corwded out in the Conference 
edition, and no paper at all Conference 
week. The Junior page has been de_ 
ferred and Ocala District came next. 
We regret the circumstances exceed- 
ingly, but hope to have more space 
allotted to us hereafter. Send your 
reports along and we promise you our 
best." 

It makes us envious to read Mrs. 
Little's League page. She has so 
many reports from her Leaguers. Ev- 
ery week the page is full of good, live 
reports. Can it be that Florida grows 
better Leagues than the "Old North 
State," or are the Florida Leaguers 
just a little more interested in the 
League, or just a little more thought- 
ful of their League editor. Or it may 
be that the Florida Editor has a way 
of getting what she wants from her 
Leaguers. If so, we wish she would 
give us her secret. We hate to think 
that our Leaguers are so thoughtless, 
but we know that our Leagues do have 
meetings that the rest of us would like 
to hear about, and we cannot under- 
stand why they will not write to 
us. 

One young man at Connelly Springs 
last summer, when Mr. Bain asked all 
who would promise to stand by their 
Editor and send in copy to hold up 
their hands, held up both hands, and 
we have not heard one word from 
him We wonder what have become 
of all the hands that were held up. 



BISHOP WILSON'S MESSAGE 

Bishop A. W. Wilson, Senior Bishop 
of our College, now far advanced in 
life and living in Baltimore, sent out 
a New Year's message to the church 
he loves and has served so long and 
well. It appears in the Associated 
Press reports in the daily papers or 
the country. We are glad to repro- 
duce it for the benefit of the church 
throughout our territory: 

"By general consent, the New 
Year's day is made the starting point 
for a new life. It is not always taken 
seriously. If it means anything to 
us, it must be most regarded as a sort 
of mile post We stand beside |it 
and simply wait, or we go ahead, 
I leaving it behind us, or we turn back 
I and retrace our steps. Which shall it 
I be? 

"Is the path over which we have 
come so satisfactory that we are 
willing to tread it again, with no new 
scenes, no new advance, nothing but 
what we have known and been ac- 
customed to in the past year? Surely 
that is not the part of wisdom. 

"Make home richer, make the per- 
sonal life fuller, add to your neigh' 
bors' enjoyment and the value of his 
life. If possible, put something into 
it that he has not known before; put 
a better thought, a higher purpose, a 
more persistent energy, if in the 
stores of your own life there is some- 
thing that he has not known. 

"Do something that you have not 
done before; help where you have 
thought hitherto you could give no 
help; look around you for opportuni- 
ties; use most available and nearest 
means for enlarging the scope of your 
neighbors' life as well as your own. 

"Nobody can tell how much may 
be done by a small show of concern 
in the life of others. A printed page, 
even a word spoken, has ofttimes been 
the means of the salvation of a soul 
nity. Get the best for yourself and 
give out the best to all whom you 
can reach." — Texas Advocate. 



GENERAL CONFERENCE IN RE- 
GARD TO THE LEAGUE 

The following is taken from the 
Raleigh Christian Advocate, and we 
think that Brother Frizelle has an- 
swered the question positively and to 
the point. 

"When the General Conference 
gives its permission for the League 
to exist, how can any pastor say: 
'There will be no League till I get 
ready?' 

"The General Conference does not 
give permission for the League to ex- 
ist. It requires that Leagues shall 
be organized in all the pastoral 
charges. The language of the Disci- 
pline is plain: 'What directions shall 
be given concerning the Epworth 
League? Answer: L et Epworth 
Leagues be organized in all our con- 
gregations.' The pastor is not charg- 



IN MEMORIAM 

Death is always sad under any cir- 
cumstances, but when it claims for 
its victim a young man, full of 
strength and vigor in the roseate 
morning of life, it Is immeasurably 
so. Seldom has the death of any 
one occasioned such widespread inter- 
est and sorrow as that of the subject 
of this sketch. 

On Friday evening, January 2nd, 
about eight o'clock, the spirit of Terry 
Shell returned to the God who gave 
it. It seemed as thougn even nature 
mourned the untimely departure of 
one of her ' most promising sons, as 
she silently wrapped her winding 
sheet about her. The beautiful snow 
which fell that sad night was a fitting 
symbol of the clean, pure life that 
he led, for the same Supreme Being 
which created both was the guide 
which Terry humbly and lovingly fol- 
lewed to the end. 

About five years ago he joined the 
First M. E. Church of this city, in 
which he was an usher at the time 
of his death. He was also a member 
of the junior choir and president of 
the young men's Baraca class. Just 
a few days before he died, he was 
talking with his pastor, planning 
many things which he hoped to see 



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his class accomplish during the com- 
ing year. Alas, he could not stay 
with us to perfect his plans! He 
spent Christmas day, in the pouring 
rain, distributing clothing and food, 
which the Baraca boys had collected 
the previous night, to the poor of our 
city and he remarked that night that 
he had spent the happiest Christmas 
of his life. His 'sunny presence must 
have brought happiness to many homes 
and hearts that day — hearts sad today 
because God has called him higher. 

Terr> was in his twentieth year and 
a model young man of exemplary hab- 
its and Christian character, for whom 
only admiration was felt, of whom only 
praise was spoken. He stood for the 
right, t'he good, the pure, and showed 
it by the correct life which he led. Of 
a sunny, happy disposition, he won and 
held many friends who will sadly miss 
him and the cheery smile he always 
had for everyone. His nature was 
frank and open — "There was nothing 
hidden about him because there was 
nothing to hide." Though his life was 
short, "We live in deeds, not years," 
and when we think of the good he did, 
he was much older than many of "three 
score years and ten." 

The influence of a godly life can 
never die, and his stay on earth — even 
while so short — can not fail to prove 
an inspiration to all who knew him. 
He will be sadly missed, but may we 
try to realize his gain — not our loss — 
and thank God that He lent him to us 
for even a little while to make earth 
richer and brighter. 

On Sunday afternoon, January 4th, 
at 2:30 oclock, his funeral was held 
from the church which he loved so 
much. Down the aisle, which he had 



walked only the Sunday before, usher- 
ing the worshipers to comfortable seats, 
he was lovingly and sorrowfully borne, 
followed by the class he loved so much 
— so incomplete without its leader — 
and a large number of grief-stricken 
relatives. The crowded church and 
floral offerings showed plainly the 
place he held in the hearts of the 
Hickory people. Especially lovely was 
the design from the Baraca class, with 
the emblem beautifully fashioned from 
roses, carnations, sweet peas and vio- 
lets. The funeral was concluded at 
the grave, where the last sad rites 
were performed; and there in the bos- 
om of the earth, was left to repose 
all that was mortal of Terry — jolly 
comrade, loyal friend and devoted 
brother. 

May the Heavenly Father comfort 
each aching heart that, with every 
throb, longs 

"* * * for t'he touch of a vanished 
hand 

And the sound of a voice that is still." 

* » * * 
"I cannot say, I will not say, that he 
is dead. 
He is just away. 
With a cheery smile and a wave of 
his hand, 

He has wandered away to some un- 
known land, 

And left us dreaming how very fair 

It needs must be since he lingers there. 

And to you who yearn till the eyelids 
burn, 

For the old time step and the glad 

return — 
Think of him faring on, as dear 
In the love of there as the love of 

here." 

A Friend. 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 22, 1914 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by Walter Thompson, SapeihtendeBt 



RECEIVED ON FIFTH SUNDAY COL- 
LECTIONS, WEEK ENDING JAN. 

17, 1914 

L. J. Home, Farmington S. S., $3.- 
46; H. B. Balding, Spring Creek S. 
S., Spring Creek, $1.00; Rev. W. F. 
Elliot, Macedonia S. S., Linwood, $1.- 
77. Carmi Felker, Cleveland S. S., 
Woodleaf, $2.00; total, $8.23. 



RECEIVED ON TEN PER CENT., 
SPECIAL AND GENERAL 
SUPPORT 

Rev. B. J. Poe, Walnut Cove ct, $7.- 
71; Rev. E. W. Fox, Weavervilla ct., 
$5.00; Rev. W. F. Elliott, Linwood ct., 
$2.50; Rev .M. F. Moores, Waynesville, 
Christmas -and thanks offering, $13.55; 
J. S. L. Orr, special support, $5.00; 
Mrs. N. L. Cranford, Delta Alpha class, 
Centenary, 'special, $25.00; Wagner and 
Whitaker, for 1 cow, 5 calves, and 1 
hide, $59.95; for pigeons, 55c; Mrs. 
Mary N. Grist, Christmas offering, 
$2.00; total, $121.26. 



RECEIVED ON BUILDING FUND, 
J. H. WEST, AGENT 

Paid on Note: F. S. Thomas, Hen- 
dersonville, $5.53. 

Paid on Subscription: Shelby: Wm. 
Lineberger, Shelby S. S., $14.30; Hen- 
dersonville: Byers Brothers, $5.00; 
Lenoir: Mrs. Mary N. Grist, $14.00; 
total, $38.83. 

New Contributions 

Hendersonville: Mrs. A. E. Silton, 
$1.00. Horse Shoe: A. Cannon, $10.00; 
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Osborne, $20.00; 
W. E. Brown, $10.00. Hendersonville: 
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Leverett, $15.00. 
95c. Loose collection, 51c. Hender- 
95c Loose collection, 51c. Hender- 
sonville: Mrs. H. L. Hefner, $1.00. 
Total, $58.46. Grand total, $97.29. 



DONATIONS 
Mrs. H. M. Teague, W. M. S., Lenoir, 
1 rain cape for child. Brame Drug Co., 
N. Wilkesboro, lot Brame's Croup and 
Pneumonia Salve. 



DELAY 

I thought to do a kindly deed, 
Time slipped away too fast, 

The deed is still undone, ah, me! 
My chance forever past. 

I meant to speak a cheering word, 
Before that word was said 

The idle world walked by, and now 
The friend I loved is dead. 

— Alice Van Leer Carrick. 



Next, they organized a little church, 
and in time they built a house of 
worship, a prim, dignified New Eng-- 
land meeting house, with a tall white 
spire. It stands at the cross-roads to 
this day. 

For eighty years the church has 
given its tone to the community. Not 
far away there is another neighbor- 
hood of a very different sort, and the 
contrast between the two is striking. 
In one, liuqor is sold freely, and there 
have always been disorder, and riot- 
ing, and tragedy. In the other, the 
little church has kept the life of the 
people sweet, and clean, and whole- 
some. 

Not long ago this church celebrated 
its birthday, and there was a surpris- 
ing attendance from far and near. 
One of the charter members still lives; 
he was one of the boys who started 
out to find the cows that morning 
eighty years before. Others told of 
the great things that the church had 
done, but he remembered his mother's 
call on that Sabbath morning — the seed 
from which so much had sprung. 
There was a deep hush over the con- 
gregation as he told the story of that 
morning; the assembled people seem- 
ed to hear in their midst that moth- 
er's gentle voice of admonition. 
Through the little church she has 
been speaking for eighty years, and 
through it she yet speaketh.. — The 
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AFTER FOURSCORE YEARS 

One Sunday morning in the year 
1833, a family newly settled on the 
unfenced prairies of Illinois, awoke 
to find that the cattle had strayed in 
the night. The boys were sent to find 
them, and as they started, their moth 
er called to them, "Boys, as you go, 
remember that it is the Sabbath day!" 

Her husband heard her words, and 
they led him to think that the boys 
had not much to remind them that 
the Sabbath was different from other 
days. Accordingly after they had re- 
turned with the cows, and had eaten 
their breakfast, he called his wife and 
children together, and had a simple 
household service of Bible-reading and 
prayer. 

Before another Sabbath he had found 
a way to have a regular religious 
service in the neighborhood. Some 
one owned a book of Payson's ser- 
mons, and one of the neighbors was 
a good reader. Another could sing, 
and another was accustomed to offer 
public prayer. 

They began to hold morning service 
and an evening prayer meeting in a 
private house. Poeple came a long 
way to attend; there were more than 
twenty the first night. 



BRIGHT HOMES 

We try to make our home bright. 
For this purpose we make use of ar- 
tificial light. Modern ways of light- 
ing homes add much to the cheerful- 
ness of the place. Electric lights shin- 
ing through ingenious designs in glass 
fill the house with a burst of glory. 
Unpretentious houses are lighted so 
as to look like a fairy's- palace. 

We brighten our homes with music, 
with pictures, with books, papers and 
magazines, with company and festiv- 
ities. We want the brightest music, 
the brightest pictures, the brightest 
literature and the brightest company 
in the home. It is natural to try to 
shut out the darkness and bring in 
the light. 

There is something more radiant 
than the brightest electric light, the 
brightest music, the brightest books. 
The radiant Christian character will 
make the home brighter than anything 
else. If every member of the home 
were illuminated by the spirit of our 
Lord, what beautiful homes we should 
see. This brightness will endure. A 
father whose soul is radiant with love 
and sympathy and goodness will leave 
a light in the home when he departs. 
That light will linger as long as the 
home shall continue to exist. 

Let the prayers in the home be 
bright. Let the conversation be bright- 
ened, not only by literary and scien- 
tific illumination, but also by the light 
which is kindled from above. A truly 
bright home, bright with love, bright 
with peace, bright with happiness, is 
a type of that home beyond the skies 
which is filled with everlasting sun- 
shine. — Selected. 



I send you forth as sheep in the midst 
of wolves." He saw the world bear- 
ing down on the little company of 
followers he was about to leave, and 
overwhelming them. But he said: 
"Blessed are ye when men shall re- 
vile you, and persecute you, and say 
all manner of evil against you falsely 
for my sake; rejoice, and be exceed- 
ing glad, for great is your reward in 
heaven." He said: "In the world ye 
shall have tribulation, but be of good 
cheer; I have overcome the world. He 
was a safe leader. He recognized the 
fury of the storm, but did not quail. 
He appreciated the strength of the 
foe, hut saw the triumph from afar. 
He has passed thraugh all the ills we 
are called to face and conquered, and 
standing on the mount of God he 
waves before the eyes of his tempted 
followers the signal of triumph, and 
cries: "In the world ye shall have 
tribulation, but be of good cheer; I 
have overcome the world." — Selected. 



SANE OPTIMISM 

Jesus was a sane optimist. He did 
not ignore the dark side. He saw the 
dark side of his own life — the cruelty, 
hypocrisy, treachery and wickedness 
of the foes that dogged his steps and 
hounded him to death. He saw that 
every step led him nearer to the 
cross. He saw clearly the tragic fate 
which awaited him, and the open sep- 
ulcher beyond the brow of Calvary. 
But beyond all he saw the morning 
shining — the morning of. the resur- 
rection and immortality^ He saw the 
tribulations to which his disciples 
would be exposed. He said: "Behold, 



JUST FOR TODAY 

Lord, for tomorrow and its needs 

I do not pray; 
Keep me, my God, from stain of sin 

Just for today. 

Let me both diligently work 

And daily pray; 
Let me be kind in word and deed, 

Just for today. 

Let me be slow to do my will, 

Promptly to obey; 
Help me to overcome my flesh, 

Just for today. 

Let me no wrong or idle word 
Unthinking say; : 

Set thou a seal upon my lips, 
Just for today. 

Let me in season, Lord, be grave, 

In season gay; 
Let me be faithful to thy grace, 

Just for today. 

So for tomorrow and its needs 
I do not pray; 
But keep me, guide me, love 

me, Lord, 
Just for today. 

— Canon Wilberforce. 



Let us only take care that, by the 
glance being turned inward or strain- 
ed onward or lost in vacant reverie, 
we do not miss our turn of service, 
and pass by those to whom we might 
have been sent on an errand straight 
from God. — Elizabeth Charles. 



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January 22, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 




On Wednesday, January 14, at the 
residence of the bride's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. A. Hewitt, in North New- 
ton, Miss Oro Hewitt and Mr. Taylor 
Cochran, Rev. W. M. Biles officiating. 

* * * * 

On December 28, 1913, at the Jona- 
than circuit parsonage, Mr. Grover 
Fowler and Miss Selma Moody, Rev. 
Joseph Pry officiating. 

* * * * 

By the same and at the same place, 
on December 30, 1913, Mr. David Hen- 
ry and Miss Blanche Wells. 

* * * * 

At Creston, Ashe county, on Wed- 
nesday, January 4th, Mr. A. H. Crow- 
ell, of Newton, to Miss Jennie Worth, 
of Creston, Rev. D. C. Ballard, pastor 
of Creston circuit, officiating. 

* * * * 

At the home of the bride's parents, 
in North Wilkesboro, on Tuesday, Jan- 
uary 13, Miss Nellie Forrester and 
Mr. L. E. Davis, Rev. Parker Holmes 
officiating. 

* * * * 

S In Salisbury, Monday afternoon, 
January 5th, Mr. Charlie Miller and 
Miss Ruth Booe, Rev. John W. Moore 
officiating. 

At the residence of the bride's par- 
ents, Dr. and Mrs. M. A. Royall, Elkin, 
N. C, on Wednesday, January 8th, 
Miss Fannie Royall to Mr. William 
Greer Ross, Rev. J. A. J. Farrington 
officiating. 




GWYN— On December 22, 1913, Chas. 
H. Gwyn went from his earthly to his 
heavenly home. In his going the town 
loses one of its best citizens, the fam- 
ily a kind husband and loving father. 
We were not prepared to learn of 
his going away from us so soon, for 
only a few of his closest friends knew 
of his serious illness. His death has 
thrown a mantle of sadness over the 
entire town. Chas. H. Gwyn was ev- 
erybody's friend. He always met you 
with a smile. May our heavenly Fath- 
er comfort the grief-stricken family. 
His funeral was conducted by Rev. 
Mr. Robertson, of the Presbyterian 
church, a very close friend of Mr. 
Gwyn, from the Methodist church, of 
which he was a member, assisted by 
the pastor, and we laid him to rest 
in the beautiful little cemetery on 
the hill. J. A. J. Farrington. 



SH ELTON — Stephen J. Shelton was 
a native of Haywood county, born 
August 27th, 1835, and was 78 years 
of age whon on the morning of No- 
vember 3rd, 1913, the death angel 
called. 

He was happily married October the 
26th, 1865, to Miss Mahale Conley, of 
Jackson county, this state. 

To say that these two were devoted 
and lived a happy life together, which 
ever enlarged, and filled as it enlarg- 
ed yrith the fellowship and devotion 
of sons and daughters, but feebly ex- 
presses it. There came to bless their 
home four daughters and three sons, 
all of whom survive except one son. 

Brother Shelton enlisted with the 
twenty-fifth North Carolina Regiment 
in the Civil War. Being a brave and 
faithful soldier he was promoted to 
the rank of lieutenant. 

His career as a soldier and his de- 
votion and enthusiasm for the cause 
of the South were steadfast. 

As a private citizen his public activ- 
ities and loyalty were constant. In 
the Centennial History of Haywood 




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County he is spoken of as one of the 
builders of Waynesville. 

He filled the position of sheriff and 
other offices of the county most cred- 
itably. 

He united with the Methodist 
church at the age of twenty-one and 
was a faithful member of the same 
for fifty-seven years. He served most 
faithfully as a steward nearly all of 
his married life, and was for a long 
time| superintendent of the Sunday 
school. He was a regular, faithful 
attendant upon all the ordinances of 
God's house. He put his time and 
money and energies into the erection 
of the church building from whose 
altar his sacred dust was taken to 
the beautiful cemetery on the hill 
to await the resurrection morn. 

His calmness and composure during 
his serious illness were the fruits of 
his Christian life. He was one of 
the most cheerful persons I ever saw 
to be so seriously ill. Always a word 
of cheer upon his lips and usually 
a smile upon his face. His patience 
in all of his sufferings was remark- 
able. An abundance of grace was giv- 
en unto him. His death was peace- 
ful and quiet His faith failed not, 
and triumphantly he entered in 
through the gates into the city. 

I miss him so much. He was one 
of my best friends. Always stood by 
me nobly. Peace to his blessed mem- 
ory. M. F. Moores. 



Over thirty years ago Brother John- 
son was converted and joined the 
Methodist church at Center, south of 
the town of Concord, and for many 
years has been one of the faithful 
members of Central church. 

In addition to being steward of the 
church he was for years district stew- 
ard, a man held in the very highest 
esteem by all the citizens of the coun- 
ty. He had been register of deeds for 
two years in the county, and the news 
of his death has brought great sorrow 
to all of our citizens. 

Harold Turner, P. C. 



JOHNSON — William Reece Johnson 
was born near Wilkesboro, North Car- 
olina, September 16, 1852 and died 
December 13, 1913, in the 62nd year 
of his age. 

September 22nd, 1881, he was mar- 
ried to Mrs. C. B. Litaker, who died 
years ago. June 5th, 1912, he was 
married to Mrs. Tabltha Holden, who 
with two brothers, A. Felix, of New 
Mexico, and Romulus, of Virginia, sur- 
vive him. 



HARTS ELL — Lewis Hartsell, the 
third son of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Hart- 
sell, was born at Mt. Pleasant, Sep- 
tember 23, 1885, and died January 3, 
1914, in the 29th year of his age. 

He was married February 28, 1909, 
to Miss Bessie Florence Long, to whom 
was born one daughter, Dorothy, two 
years old, who, with his wife and two 
brother's, A. F., Charles, and his par- 
ents survive him. 

He was converted and joined the 
Methodist church at Mount Pleasant 
under the ministry of Rev. C. M. Pick- 
ens, and has been a faithful member 
ever since. 

For some years he has taken an in- 
terest in the Masonic Fraternity and 
was at the time of his death Worship- 
ful Master of the Concord Lodge which 
had charge of the burial services. 

Peace be to his ashes. 

Harold Turner, P. C. 



STEEL E — Mrs. Sarah Adelaide 
Steele, wife of Hamilton B. Steele, of 
Yadkin Valley, N. C, died Dec. 17, 
1913, aged 53 years, 5 months and 29 
days. 

She had not been in good health 
for several years aDd had gone to 
Johns Hopkins Hospital for an opera- 
tion. She died in the hospital the 
day following the operation. 

Mrs. Steele had been a faithful and 



consecrated member of the Methodist 
church for about thirty-five years. She 
manifested the spirit of her Master in 
her love and sympathy for all classes 
of humanity. She said the day before 
her death: "I am ready to go if it 
is the Lord's will; I want all my sons 
to join the church and live good lives; 
and the whole family to meet me in 
heaven." 

The funeral service was held in the 
home by her pastor, Rev. J. C. Keever, 
and her body was laid to rest in the 
family graveyard. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, it has pleased our Heaven- 
ly Father, who doeth all things well, 
to remove from our midst our beloved 
sister and friend, Mrs. Betty Kellum, 
we, the undersigned committee, repre- 
senting the Ladies Aid Society of Zion 
church, offer the following resolutions 
as an expression of our love and es- 
teem: 

First, that in her death the church 
and Society have lost one of their best, 
most faithful and consecrated mem- 
bers; and the family a most loving, 
devoted mother. 

Second, that we extend to the be- 
reaved children and grandchildren our 
deepest sympathy in this their great 
loss and commend them to our Heav- 
enly Father and bid them look through 
the clouds of sorrow to the time they 
shall be a united family in the home 
"over there." 

Third, that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the family, a copy be 
sent to the bereaved family, a copy/be 
placed on our minutes and a copy be 
sent to our church paper. 
Signed, 

Mrs. J. W, Zink, 
Mrs. M. C. Field, 
Mrs. W. C. Lambert, 
Mrs. W. P. Mullicah, 
Mrs. W, B, Richardson, 



Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 22, 1914 




FIRST QUARTER— LESSON IV- 



Serving Jesus. Luke 8:1-3; 9:57-;62 



Oolden Text — Inasmuch as ye did 
it. unto one of these my brethren, even 
these least, ye did it unto me. Matt 
25:40. 



i Summary of the Lesson 

The study for today consists of sev- 
eral brief passages from different chap- 
ters of Luke's Gospel, which sets be- 
fore us the attitude of a number of 
people toward Jesus and His service. 
Tq begin with, there is a group of 
women who owed much to the Master 
and who gladly made material contri- 
butions and personally ministered to 
Him and the twelve. 

Then there are men who feel the 
compulsion of the personality of Jesus 
and desire to follow Him, but are held 
back by hesitations which He rebukes. 
At the home of Martha and Mary two 
other attitudes emerge. Both women 
are devoted to Jesus. Martha is so 
very busy ministering to the physical 
needs of Jesus that she quite forgets 
His spiritual message. Mary is so en- 
grossed in' listening to His words of 
Heavenly wisdom that she for the time 
forgets all other things. Jesus com- 
mends Mary and very gently rebukes 
Martha. 

Devoted Women 

With much discernment and sympa- 
thy and charm of style, George Mathe- 
son once wrote a book on The Repre- 
sentative Women of the Bible. The 
very title reminds us that women play- 
ed an important part in the life out 
of which the Bible came. Many re- 
markable women go walking through 
the pages of the Old Testament and the 
New. Some of them are good and 
some are bad. Some of them are 
strong and some of them are weak. 
Some are gentle and some have great 
robustness. Very distinct and human 
they are and very vivid is their por- 
trayal. To know well the women of 
the Bible is to have a new knowledge 
of womanhood itself. 

The group of women to whom we 
are introduced at the beginning of the 
lesson owed much to Jesus. They had 
been great sufferers and he had re- 
moved the cause of their suffering. 
Physical and mental diseases had rob- 
bed them of the very joy of life. Jesus 
had healed the body and given peace 
to the mind. 

Thus it came about that in the souls 
of these women there bloomed the 
most beautiful flowers of gratitude. 
Their eyes kindled and their hearts 
glowed at the very mention of the 
name of Jesus. In the most sponta- 
neous and eager fashion they wanted 
to serve Him. Some of them at least 
were women of means, and with open- 
handed generosity and hearty personal 
service they ministered to the needs 
of the Prophet of Galilee and His fol- 
lowers. 

It was not hard for Jesus to accept 
this sort of kindness. It was absolute- 
ly free from calculation and it was 
quite as free from any thought of 
proud condescension. These women 
felt that they were much more honored 
in the giving than He in the receiving. 
They felt that He did them a favor 
in allowing them to give to Him. 

There are gifts and gifts and there 
are givers and givers. A fine gift may 
be robbed of all attractiveness and 
power to please by the way in which 
it is given. It is a more wonderful 
thing to know how to give than to 
be able to give. The gift may be made 
priceless in one fashion alone. That 
is by the way in which it is given. 
It may be said in praise of these de- 
voted women that they knew how to 
give. 



Hesitating Men 

Admirers of James M. Barrie will 
remember with what mixed feelings 
they read his story Sentimental Tom- 
my and its sequel, Tommy and Grisel, 
both published some years ago. Pro- 
fessor Henry van Dyke gave the key 
to the two books when in his penetrat- 
ing fashion he said that Tommy was 
a man who never became a person. 
In truth Tommy was a sort of human 
chameleon, always reflecting the moral 
color of his environment. He did not 
have a definite character of his own. 
He was a mirror which showed pic- 
tures of his associates and not of him- 
self. So he vacillated between good 
and evil, just according to the charac- 
ter of the people with whom he chanced 
to be. 

The men who wanted to follow Jesus 
and yet were drawn by other interests 
represent this hesitating and vacillat- 
ing type of mind. They belonged to 
the company of people who are incap- 
able of a sharp "either — or" and al- 
ways want to say both. They belonged 
to the type of man who would like to 
be several kinds of people at once. Of 
course such a compromise was impos- 
sible, and Jesus sharply rebuked the 
attitude which was incapable of clean- 
cut and definite decision. 

If David Smith's suggestion is true, 
the man who wanted to go and bury 
his father was in reality asking to 
go home and take care of the old man 
until he died. He said in effect: "I 
want to be your follower and if you 
will let me live at home until my aged 
father has finished his course of years 
on earth, then I will remember your 
wonderful teachings and oome and fol- 
low you.,' 

The men who hesitated were plan- 
ning to put themselves under influ- 
ences which would have confirmed 
their hesitation and not their decision 
to follow Christ. Their attitude may 
be described with a justifiable touch 
of irony in the words: "We will fol- 
low you, but first let us put off follow- 
ing you. Let us get away with in- 
fluences which will be different and 
some of them hostile to our following 
you. We cannot make a sharp and 
final decision in your presence, but 
away from your persuasive power and 
in surroundings where the persuasion 
is all the other way we will come final- 
ly to breaking with old ties." Of 
course, they who hesitated in this 
fashion were sure to be lost as far as 
any right decision at all was con- 
cerned and Jesus sharply rebuked their 
hesitation. 

The Woman Who Served 
It must be conceded at once that 
our sympathy goes out to Martha. This 
efficient, bustling, busy nousewlfe Is a 
very modern figure. When the sons 
and daughters and grandsons and 
granddaughters go to the old home for 
Thanksgiving or Christmas there is 
always a Martha, eagerly hurrying 
about and seeing that all the prepara- 
tions are complete. Without her the 
delightful celebration would be impos- 
sible. If everybody was receiving in 
the parlor and nobody was looking 
after the kitchen, what would become 
of the dinner? 

""While this is true, it is not all the 
truth. If we are going to be perfectly 
candid and closely analytical in our 
study of the situation, we must frank- 
ly confess that Martha allowed her 
dinner party to get on her nerves. The 
fingers of hospitality were very busy, 
but the soul of hospitality was lost. 
She was looking after the wants of 
Jesus in such a flushed and nervous 
fashion that she was in a fair way to 
make him complete 1 v uncomfortable. 
The wheels of hospitality were creak- 
ing and grating in a very unpleasant 
fashion. Martha was so anxious to 
please Jesus that she was running a 
grave risk in the hot and irritated 
intensity of her service of not pleasing 
Him at all. 

But there was more at stake than 
the spirit of hospitality. Jesus did not 
come to be a guest of honor at dinner 




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parties. He came to make the king- 
dom of God real. With Martha in the 
kingdom of pots and pans and dishes, 
to drop into modern vernacular for a 
moment, was very real, but the king- 
dom of God for the time being was 
lost sight of. She was so busy minis- 
tering to the body of Jesus that she 
forgot that He had ^ome to minister 
to her soul. In her devotion to her 
work as a good housekeeper she was 
interfering with the work of Jesus as 
a keeper of the heavenly mysteries. 
For the moment the success of her 
dinner was more important to her than 
the success of the kingdom of God. 
At least of the one she was thinking 
intensely and of the other not at all. 

The Woman Who Listened 

It is very easy to criticise Mary. She 
allowed her sister to do all the work, 
we may say, and herself bore no share 
of the burden. Martha had all the 
work and Mary had all the pleasure 
of the visit. When she shifted all the 
responsibility on other shoulders, . of 
course it was easy for her to fill her 
mind with the teachings of Jesus. She 
ignored earthly responsibilities for the 
sake of heavenly thoughts. 

Now in such an indictment of Mary, 
if we make it, we are letting our im- 
agination quite run away with us. We 
are given no reason for supposing that 
she did not work as hard as Martha 
before His coming. It is only when 
He came she insisted on emphasizing 
the spiritual food He was giving to 
others rather than the physical food 
others were giving to Him. Now that 
the Master had arrived, the feast of 
the soul, and not the feast of the body, 
was to be kept in the foreground. When 
Jesus was gone she doubtless would 
use the inspiration of this visit in 
keeping her spirits high as she went 
about many a hard task, Mary had 



the true perspectve and for this Jesus 
commended her. 

The complaint of Martha, dictated 
by her overwrought condition, was 
dealt with gently and yet firmly by 
Jesus. There were times wnen u lis- 
tening ear was better than a nervous 
hand extended in service. In the long 
run Mary would serve all the better 
because se had listened, and in the 
long run service would lose all its 
charm to Martha unless she listened 
and received the spirit of true service 
into her soul. Because jviary knew 
when to listen, it did not fallow that 
she was a shirk, who did not know 
when to work. 

Jesus loved both of these sisters, 
and they both loved Him. His gentle 
word cleared the atmosphere, and we 
may think of Martha as letting down 
the high tension and giving ear as well 
as hand to the Master while He abode 
in her house. When Martha learns to 
listen as well as to work she becomes 
a spiritual power as well as an efficient 
housekeeper. 

And because Mary has listened she 
will work better all the rest of her life. 
— New York Christian Advocate. 



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January 22, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



N. B. Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as intormation, and are not 
guaranteed. 

12:25 a. m. No. 32, daily. The South- 
ern's Southeastern .Limited. Pull- 
man drawing-room, compartment, 
and open section sleeping cars 
Jacksonville, Augusta, and Aiken 
to New York. Day coaches. Dining 
car service. 

12:55 a. m. No. 112 daily. Local for 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Winston-Salem to 
Kaleign open at 9:30 p. m. 
1:20 a. m. No. 29, daily. Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and 
ODServation, sleeping cars New 
York, and Richmond to Birming- 
ham, and New York to ColumDUS, 
Ga. Daily tourist car Washington 
to San i<rancisco via Sunset Route. 
Dining car service. 
2:05 a. m. No. 30, daily. Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room, 
and observation sleeping cars Birm- 
ingham, Columbus, and Asheville 
to New York, and Birmingham to 
Richmond, Va. Tourist car San 
Francisco- Washington. Dining car 
service. 

2:45 a. m. No. 31, daily. The South- 
ern's Southeastern Limited. Pull- 
man drawing-room, open section, 
and compartment sleeping cars New 
York to Jacksonville, Aiken, and 
Augusta, and New York to Ashe- 
ville. Day coaches. Dining car 
service. 

3:45 a. m. 45 daily local for Charlotte, 
connecting for Atlanta and points 
south. 

7:10 a. m. No. 8 dally local for Rich- 
mond. 

7:15 a. m. 1st No. 37 daily. New York 
and New Orleans Limited, Pullman 
drawing-room, state-room, open 
section and observation sleeping 
cars, New York and New Orleans; 
club car Washington to Montgom- 
ery; Pullman parlor car Greensboro 
to Montgomery. Solid Pullman 
lanta. Pullman observation parlor 
cial. Pullman drawing-room, open 
section sleeping cars New York to 
Asheville, Charlotte, Macon and At- 
car Greensboro to Atlanta. Solid 
Pullman train, with dining car ser- 
vice. 

7:15 a. m. 2nd No. 37 daily Atlanta bpe- 
train with dining car service. 

7:30 a. m. No. 108 daily local Greensboro 
to Goldsboro. 

7:35 a. m. No. 11 daily local to Atlanta. 
Pullman drawing-room, sleeping 
cars Norfolk to Asheville, and Rich- 
mond to Charlotte. 

7:40 a. m. No. 154, daily except Sunday. 
Local to Ramseur. 

8:15 a. m. No. 237, daily for Winston- 
Salem and North Wilkesboro. Hand- 
les Pullman sleeping car Raleigh 
to Winston-Salem. 

8:20 a. m. No. 133 daily local for Mt. 
Airy. 

9:30 a. m. No. 44 daily for Washington 

and points north. 
9:40 a. m. No. 144 daily for Raleigh, 
Selma and Goldsboro; handles At- 
lanta-Raleigh sleeping car. 

12:30 p. m. No. 21 daily local to Ashe- 
ville and Waynesville, connecting at 
Asheville with Carolina Special for 
all points west. Coaches and Pull- 
man chair car. 

12:45 p. m. No. 7 daily local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Seneca and 
Columbia. 

12:55 p. m. No. 130 daily local for San- 
ford, Fayetteville and Wilmington. 
1:00 p. m. No. 14 daily local for Rich- 
mond. Sleeping car Danville te 
Richmond. 

1:35 p. m. No. 36, daily U. S. Fast Mall, 
for Washington, New York and 
points north. Pullman sleeping cars 
Birmingham and New Orleans to 
New York, and Asheville to Rich- 
mond. Pullman chair car Greenville 
to Washington. Dining car ser- 
vice. 

2:30 p. m. No. 151 dally except Sunday 
for Madison. 

2:00 p. m. No. 207 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

3:30 p. m. No. 230 daily except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

4:20 p. m. No. 22 daily for Raleigh, Sel- 
ma and Goldsboro. Pullman chair 
car Waynesville to Goldsboro. 

6:00 p. m. No. 131 daily for Mount Airy 
connecting at Rural Hall, daily ex- 
cept Sunday with train for North 
Wilkesboro. 

5:40 p. m. No. 13 daily local for Salis- 
bury; handles Pullman sleeping car 
Richmond to Asheville, which car 
may be occupied until 7 a. m. 

6:10 p. m. No. 35 dally U. S. Fast Mall 
through to Atlanta and New Or- 
leans. Pullman sleeping cars New 
York to New Orleans and Birming- 
ham, and Pullman chair car Wash- 
ington to Greenville. Dining car 
service. 

6:30 p. m. No. 132 dally local for San- 
ford. 

6:35 p. m. No. 235 dally for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:30 p. m. No. 43 daily for Atlanta and 
points south. Pullman sleeping car 
Raleigh to Atlanta. 

10:13 p. m. 1st No. 38 daily Atlanta Spec- 
ial. Pullman drawing-room, open 
section sleeping cars Macon, Atlan- 
ta, Charlotte and Asheville to New 
York. Pullman observation car At- 
lanta to Greensboro. Solid Pullman 
train with dining car service. 

10:20 p. m. No. 233 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

10:31 p. m. No. 12 daily local to Richmond, 
Handles Pullman sleeping cars 
Asheville to Norfolk and Charlotte 
to Richmond. 

11:13 p. m. 2nd No. 38 dally New York 
and New Orleans Limited. Pullman 
drawing-room, state room, open sec- 
tion and observation sleeping cars 
New Orleans to New York; club 
car Montgomery to Washington. 
Solid Pullman train with dining 
oar Mt-Ylco. t 




KNOWhJG HOW 

I've sometimes heard my grandpa tell 
That folks who know just how to 
smell 

Can get the summer from one rose 
Or from a little breeze that blows. 

And father says no matter where 
You live, if you will just take care 
And make the best of your two eyes, 
You'll see so much you'll grow real 
wise. 

And then my mother's often heard 
One little pleasant-spoken word 
That's made somebody smile and smile 
And feel cheered up for quite a while. 

They say it doesn't matter much 
Whether a child has such and such; 
It's how she'll learn to make things 
do. 

And p'r'aps it s so with grown folks, 
too. — The (Jongregationalist 



THE NEW LEAVES 

"Wake up!" said a clear little voice. 
Tommy woke, and sat up in bed. At 
the foot of the bed stood a boy about 
his own age, all dressed in white, like 
fresh snow. He had very bright eyes 
and he looked straight at Tommy. 

"I am the New Year!" said the boy. 

"Who are you?" asked Tommy. 
"This is my day, and I have brought 
you your leaves " 

"What leaves?" asked Tommy. 

"The new ones, to be sure!" said 
the New Year. "I hear bad accounts 
of you from my Daddy — " 

"Who is your Daddy?" asked Tom- 
my. 

"The Old Year, of course!" said the 
boy. "He said you asked too many 
questions, and I see he was right. He 
says you are greedy, too, and that 
you sometimes pinch your little sis- 
ter, and that one day you threw your 
Reader into the fire. Now, all this 
must stop." 

"O, must it?" said Tommy. He felt 
frightened and did not know just what 
to say. 

The boy nodded. "If it does not 
stop," he said, "you will grow worse 
and worse every year, till you grow 
up into a Horrid Man Do you want 
to be a Horrid Man?" 

N-no!" said Tommy. 

"Then you must stop being a horrid 
boy!" said the New Year. "Take your 
leaves!" and he held out a packet of 
what looked like copybook leaves, all 
sparkling white, like his own clothes. 

"Turn over one of these every day," 
he said, "and soon you will be a good 
boy instead of a horrid one." 

Tommy took the leaves and looked 
at them. On each leaf a few words 
were written. On one it said, "Help 
your mother!" On another, "Don't 
pull the cat's tail!" On another, 
Don't eat so much!" And on still an- 
other, "Don't fight Billy Jenkins!" 

"O!" cried Tommy. "I have to fight 
Billy Jenkins! He said — " 

"Goodby!" said the New Year. "I 
shall come again when I am old to see 
whether you have been a good boy or 
a horrid one. Remember: 

"Horrid boy makes horrid man; 

You alone can change the plan " 

He turned away and opened the 
window. A cold wind blew in and 
swept the leaves out of Tommy's hand. 
"Stop! stop!" he cried. "Tell me — " 
But the New Year was gone, and Tom- 
my, starting after him, saw only his 
mother coming into the room. "Dear 
child," she said. "Why, the wind is 
blowing everything about." 

"My leaves! My leaves!" cried 
Tommp; and jumping out of bed he 
looked all over the room, but he could 
not find one. 

"Never mind, said Tommy. "I can 
turn them just the same, and I mean 
to. I will not grow into a Horrid Man." 
And he didn't. — Ladies Home Journal. 



THE KIT THAT "GOT EVEN" 

The two plump house kittens were 
washing their faces on the front door- 
step as the thin barn kit came up the 
path. "Good morning, my dears," she 
said, stopping and grinning politely. 

The two house kits looked at each 
other, then they looked at the barn kit, 
then they made up two naughty faces. 

"You're very thin," said the black 
one. 

"And homely," added the white one. 

"And we don't wish to associate with 
you," said both at once, after which 
they stuck their tails out straight and 
marched around the corner. 

"Pooh! who cares for them, any- 
way?" cried the barn kit, fluffing her 
back up. "I'm sure I'd rather be home- 
ly than have such awful manners. But 
I'll find a way to get even with them," 
and she stalked slowly back to the 
barn. 

By and by the two house kits looked 
into each other's eyes, and, because 
they could see only a narrow thread of 
black in the green, they knew it must 
be twelve o'clock and dinner time. So 
back they trotted to the side door; 
and what do you think they found 
waiting for them? 

An empty saucer — just that and 
nothing else. 

"The shutters are all closed," said 
the black house kit. 

"Everybody is gone away," added 
the white house kit. 

"And we are forgotten," said both 
at once. So they sat side by side on 
the piazza, and cried into their left 
fore paws— their right forepaws they 
needed to sit up with. Now, when 
they had shed about seven tears, they 
suddenly stopped. 

"It seems to me," sobbed the black 
kit. 

"As if I smelled something good," 
sobbed the white kit. 

"Rather like mice," sobbed both at 
once. 

So they immediately dried their four 
eyes with the fore paws (and there 
were two eyes to each paw, which is 
a riddle), and then they looked around. 

Lo and .behold! in the saucer which 
had been empty lay two litttle brown 
mice, fairly begging to be eaten. 

"Who put those there?" cried the 
house kits, in surprise. 

"I did, my dears," answered the baru 
kit, popping out from behind the pump. 
"I put them there to get even with you 
for being so rude this morning." 

The two house kittens grew so limp 
with shame that their tails drooped off 
the piazza. 

"We're very sorry," whispered the 
black one. 

"And awfully ashamed," added the 
white one. 

"Will you please excuse us?" said 
both at once. 

"Pray, don't mention it," answered 
the barn kit, pleasantly; I've got even, 
and that's enough. Let's begm over 
again." — Sally Backus Griggs, in Harp- 
er's Young People. 



When the three children return ed 
from their walk, they found their moth- 
er waiting for them on chi porch 
Mother: "Well, dears, did you meet 
any one you knew?" The three chil- 
dren: "Yes, Ruby and Dereck." Moth- 
er: "Where did you meet them?" 
Barbara (the youngest) : "At the same 
place as we was." 



When you looked into my mother's 
eyes you knew as if he had told you 
why God had sent her into the world — 
it was to open the minds of all who 
looked to beautiful thoughts. — Sir J. 
M. Barrie. 



Many, indeed, think of being happy 
with God in heaven, but the being 
happy with God on earth never enters 
their thoughts. — John Wesley. 



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Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 22, 1914 




v 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT— C. A. Wood, 
Presiding Elder, Weaverville, N. C. 

First Round 

January 

Sulphur Springs, Pleasant Hill 24-25 

West Asheville 25 

Black Mountain 30 

Swannanoa Ct., Swannanoa 31 

February 

Central, Asheville 1 

Weaverville 1 

Fairview Ct., Tweeds 7-8 

Tryon and Saluda, Tryon 8 

Weaverville Ct.. Salem 14-15 

Mars Hill, Laurel 15 

Leicester, Leicester 21-21! 

Walnut, Jewell Hill 28 

March 

Spring Creek, Balm Grove 1 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— Plato T. Dur- 
ham, Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Weddington, Hebron 24 

Waxhaw, Waxhaw 25-26 

Prospect, Trinity 31 

February 

Monroe, Central 1 

North Monroe 1 

Ansonville, Ansonville 7-8 

Lilesville, Lilesville 8-9 

Morven, Sandy P 14-16 

Wadesboro, night IB 

Unionville, Grace 21-22 

Polkton, Peachland, night 22-23 

March 

Matthews, Matthews 1-2 

Marshville, Gilboa 7-8 

Mt. Zion, Mt. Zion 14-15 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT— G. T. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

Uwharrie Ct., Concord 24-25 

Denton Ct., Denton 2B-2t 

February 

Deep River Ct., West Bend 31-1 

Asheboro, a. m 1 

Rai.dleman and N. St. Ptul's 1-2 

Coleridge Ct., Concord 7-8 

Ramseur and F'ville, Ramseur 8-9 

Ruffin Ct., Ruffln 14-16 



MOUNT AIRY DISTRICT— R. M. Hoyle, 
Presiding Elder, Mount Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Walnut Cove Ct, Pin« Hall 24 

Madisen and Steneville, Madison ..25-26 

Rural Hall Ct., Rural Hall 31 

February 

Pilot Mountain Ct., Pilot Mountain ..1-2 

Jonesville Ct., Jonesville 7-8 

Elkin Station 8-9 

Danbury Ct., Davis' Chapel 14-15 

Spray and Draper, Spray 21-22 

Leaksville Station 23-24 

Dobson Ct.. Slloam 28 

March 

Yadklnville, East Bend ..1-2 

MORGANTON DISTRICT— J. E. GAY, 
Presiding Elder, Marion, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Broad River, Wesley's hapel 24-25 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Henrietta, 25-26 

Cliffside, Cliffside 27 

Morganton Ct., Mt., 

Pleasant 31, Feb. 1 

February 

Connelly Springs, Connelly Springs, 7-8 

Micaville, Shoal Creek 13 

Bald Creek, Eli Shoal 14-15 

Burnesville, Burnesville 15-16 

Spruce Pine and Bakensville, Spruce 
Pine 21-22 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— M. 
H. Vestal, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Jefferson, Creston 2 

Boone,. Fairview 10-11 

Wilkes, Beulah 17-18 

North Wllkesboro Station 25-26 

February 

Elkville Mission, Stanton 1 

Creston, Creston 7-8 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 10 

Elk Park, Elk Park 12 

Avery, PInola 14-15 

SALISBURY DISTRICT — W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Woodleaf Ct., Cleveland 24-25 

China Grove Station, night 26-26 

Concord Ct., Olivet 31 

February 

Concord Ct., Olivet 1 

Concord, Forest Hill, night 1 

Albemarle Circuit, Bethesda 7-8 

Albemarle, Central, night 8 

Kannapolls Station 14-16 

Landls Circuit, Landis 14-16 

Bethel and Loves Chapel, Bethel ..21-22 

Concord, Epworth, night 22 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m 28, Mar. 1 

Concord, Weatford, night 28, Mar. 1 



SHELBY DISTRICT— J. R. Scroggs, 
Presiding Elder, Shelby, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Polkville, Clover Hill 24-26 

South Fork, Plateau 31 

February 

Llncolnton Station 1 

Lincolnton Ct., Pisgah 7-8 

Lowell, Lowell 14 

McAdenvllle McAdenvllle, night 14 

Crouse, Antioch 21 

Cherry vllle, Mary's Chapel 28 

District Stewards will meet at Shelby 
on Wednesday, Dec. 31, 1913, at 2 o'clock 
p. m. 



STATESVILLE D I ST R I ST — L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January ; 

Tredell Ct., Olin, 11 a. m 24-25 k 

Race St., Race St., night 25-26 ; 

vlexander Ct., Hiddenite, \ 

11 a. m 31, Feb. 1 ? 

February j 

Stony Point Ct., Stony Ft., night 1-2 k 

Catawba Ct., Catawba, 11 a. m. ..7-8 > 
Cool Springs Ct., New Salem, 

11 a. m 14-15 J 

Troutman Ct., Vanderburg, 11 a. m., 21-22 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night, 22-23 
Mooresvllle Ct., Fairview, 

11 a. m 28, Mar. 1 



March 

Davidson Sta., Davidson, night 1-2 

Marlon Station 7-8 

N. Lenoir Ct., Mt. Zion, 11 a. m. . .7-8 
Lenoir Sta., Lenoir, night 8-9 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
dell, Presiding Elder, R. 2, Asheville, 
N. C. 

January 

aienvilla Ct., Glanvllle 23-24 

Highlands Ct., Highlands 25-26 

Franklin Ct, Salem 28-29 

Macon Ct, Union 30-31 

February 

Franklin Station 1-2 

Hayesville Ct, Bethel 4-5 

Ranger Ct, Ranger 7 

Murphy Station 8-9 

Robbinsville, Robbinsville 11-12 

Murphy Ct, Tomotla 14 

Andrews Station 15-16 

Crestmont 21-22 

Waynesville Station 24 

Canton Station 25 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, Pre- 
siding Elder, Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

Januar 

Linwood Circuit, Linwood 24-25 

Lexington 25-26 

Forsyth Ct, Bethel 31, Feb. 1.. 

February 

Forsyth Ct., Bethel 1 

Cooleemee, night 1-2 

Lewisville, Sharon 7-8 

Southsid.e night 8-9 

Centenary, 11 a. m 14 

West End, 7:30 p. m 14 

Farmington, Farmlngton 21-22 

■Vdvance, Advance 22-23 



CHARITY 

The little I have seen in the world 
and known of the history of mankind 
teaches me to look at their errors in 
sorrow, and not in anger. When I 
take the history of one poor heart 
that has sinned and suffered and rep- 
resent to myself the struggles and 
temptations it has passed through — 
the brief pulsations of joy; the tears 
of regret; the feebleness of purpose; 
the scorn of the world that has little 
charity; the desolation of the soul's 
sanctuary, and the threatening voices 
within; health gone; happiness gone 
— [ would fain leave the erring soul 
of my fellowman with Him from whose 
hands it came. — Dr. Chalmers. 



Look upon the bright side of your 
condition; then your discontents will 
disperse. Pore not upon your losses, 
but recount your mercies. — Watson. 



YOU WILL WRITE A LETTER 
LIKE THIS 

I wish that I knew which one of the 
thousands of letters I receive would 
have the most weight with you, my 
friend. I can't quote all of them here, 
but I am going to ask you to read this 
one carefully and then give me a 
chance to make you write me one very 
much like it. Here is the letter : 

701 Barnard St., 
Savannah, Ga., Dec. 28, 1910. 
Mr. N. F. Shivar, Shelton, S. C. 
Dear Sir: As you are aware, in 1909 
I was suffering with indigestion, stom- 
ach and liver disorders and all its train 
of horrifying phenomena for several 
months. I had lived on milk, soft eggs, 
shredded wheat, a very insufficient diet 



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If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
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tion, rheumatism, gall stones, kidney 
or liver disease, or any chronic ail- 



ment due to impure blood, I invite you 
to match your faith in the Spring 
against my pocketbook. If the water 
fails to benefit you simply say so, re- 
turn the empty demijohns and I will 
promptly and willingly refund your 
money — every cent. Sign below: 

Shivar Spring, 

Box 5B, Shelton, S. C. 
Gentlemen : 

I accept your guarantee offer and 
enclose herewith two dollars for ten 
gallons of Shivar Mineral Water. I 
agree to give it a fair trial, in accor- 
dance with instructions contained in 
booklet you will send, and if the re- 
sults are not satisfactory to me you 
agree to refund the price in full upon 
receipt of the two empty demijohns, 
which I agree to return promptly. 
Name 

Address i 

Shipping Point 

(Please write distinctly.) 

Note: — The Advertising Manager of 
the N. C. Christian Advocate per- 
sonally acquainted with Mr. Shivar. 
You run no risk whatever in accept- 
ing his offer. I have personally wit- 
nessed the remarkable curative effects 
of this water in a very serious case. 



January 22, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



The Christian Advocate Offers You 

This Well Known Bible Dictionary 

SEE SPECIAL OFFER BELOW 

Realizing the wide demand that exists among our constituents for this Bible Dictionary, we have 
made a special arrangement with the publishers of the work by which they agreed to supply it to 

us on exceptional terms, provided we 



Have your friends take advan- 
tage of this special offer 
as well as 
yourself 




This is a reduced 
photograph of the 
complete book 
which is Sfx7| inches in size 
and contains 834 pages, 440 
illustrations and 16 maps 
printed in colors. Bound in 
Cloth, gold and ink stamping 



would widely advertise it, and this 
enables us to offer this well-known 
Bible Dictionary in its original form 
and with all its important features, 
including over 400 illustrations and 
maps in colors, at less than half the 
regular price. 

THE FATHER OF ALL BIBLE 
DICTIONARIES 

Everyone acknowledges the superior 
value of Dr. William Smith's Bible Dic- 
tionary, ascontaining thefruitof theripest 
Biblical scholarship. It is practically the 
foundation, or father, of all other Bible 
Dictionaries. This late edition is brought 
down to the twentieth century and thor- 
oughly revised to incorporate modern re- 
search and discoveries in Bible lands. It 
has been adapted in its presentform to the 
convenience of teachers and scholar?. 

MAKES BIBLE STUDY EASY. 
MAKES THE BIBLE PLAIN 
TO EVERY READER 

This Bible Dictionary is a veritable 
treasureto Christian Workers. It contains 
in the simplest languages full explanation 
of all topics mentioned in the Bible — every 
place, nation, tribe, person, and historical 
event;every custom andrite; every instru- 
ment and implement; every animal, plant , 
flower, mineral, metal, etc. It is a system- 
atic collation of all the facts recorded in 
the Bible, supplemented and explained by 
materials supplied from authentic records 
of Biblical times. It gives in compact and 
lucid form the substance of the result of 
profound Biblical scholarship and research. 
IT OPENS A NEW UNDERSTAND- 
ING AND APPRECIATION OF THE 
BIBLE IN A WAY THAT NO OTHER 
BOOK DOES. 

Our Special Offer 

From this till February 28 
we offer the Advocate one 
year and this dictionary for 



$2.50 



This applies to new subscrib- 
ers and renewals. 



Address- CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 

Bntersd the 1 sit Office at Greensboro, N. C. , as 
mall matter o. the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year $1.60 

Six Months 76 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 
per year. 

Make aU remittances to CHRISTIAN 
ADVOCATE, Greensboro, N. C. 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION (INC.) 

D. B. Coltxane, President Concord 

Rev. J. R. Scroggs, Vlce-Pres., Charlotte 

N. L. Eure, Secretary Greensboro 

W. a. Bradshaw High Point 

T. C. Hoylo Greeasbore 





w - - - 

i 


Our Dead 


i 



CORAM — Nannie Alcorn was born 
on September 20th, 1868; died Janu- 
ary 5th, 1914, aged 45 years, 3 months 
and 15 days. 

She was reared in a Christian home, 
her parents being members of tjhe 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
When a young girl she joined the 
church of her parents. From youth 
she was pious and was a consistent 
member of the church and was a 
taithtul Christian. 

On February 10th, 1892, she was 
married to W. T. Coram. From this 
union were born four children. Three 
of these, two daughters and one son, 
survive their mother. And the hus- 
band is left without a companion. 
They are left lonely. It is sad that 
the two little girls, one seven and 
the other eleven years old, are left 
without mother just as she was so 
much needed by them. 

She was a loving mother, a faith- 
ful companion, a good neighbor, and 
was most loved by those who knew 
her best. She died without a fear, 
and with perfect resignation to the 
will of her heavenly Father. 

The funeral and burial service was 
conducted at the Alcorn cemetery by 
Rev. J. T. Strader, a local minister 
whom she esteemed very highly, and 
the writer, on Tuesday, January 6th, 
1914, in the presence of a large circle 
of relatives and sympathizing friends. 

"Blessed are the dead who die in 
the Lord." 

Her pastor, 

A. J. Burrus. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, our Heavenly Father in 
!his infinite wisdom has seen fit to 
.call J. M. Pettit, a member of Laurel 
Hill Sunday school, a consistent mem- 
ber of the M. E. Church, South, for 
fifty years and a Sunday school sup- 
erintendent for twenty-five years; 
therefore be it resolved: 

First, that we, the members of the 
Sunday school, bow in humble sub- 
mission to His will who doeth all 
things well. 

Second, that in his death the church 
and Sunday school have lost one of 
their best and most consecrated mem- 
bers. 

Third, that we extend to the be- 
reaved family our deep and heartfelt 
sympathy and commend them to the 
care of the heavenly Father, and bid 
them look through the clouds of sor- 
row to his eternal life. 

Fourth, that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the bereaved family 
and the N. C. Christian Advocate. 

Mrs. R. L. Brooks, 
Miss Elsie Miller, 
Mr. Stover Warren, 
Mr. B. F. Brooks. 



LEE — Frank Lee, Sr., was born Feb. 
18th, 1838, and died at the home of 
his son, Mr. S. B. Lee, in Anson Co., 
December 12th, 1913. 



Brother Lee was married to Mrs. 
Rosa Hiatt Allen, November 28th, 
1860. To this union were born seven 
children, four sons and three daugh- 
ters. His wife and one daughter pass- 
ed away some years ago. 

Brother Lee was a man greatly 
loved by all who knew him. His was 
a warm and generous heart; he loved 
every one. 

He was converted early in life and 
joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. During all the years he was 
loyal and served the church faithfully 
as a steward and trustee. He was a 
friend always to his pastor. 

He was burled from Wightman 
church Sunday, December 14th, in the 
presence of a large congregation of 
relatives and friends. 

May the grace of God sustain the 
sorrowing ones. 

L. L. Smith. 



GRIFFITH — Miss Gertrude Griffith, 
the only daughter of Mr. Geo. J. and 
Mrs. Annie Griffith, was born Decem- 
ber 12, 1894, and peacefully fell asleep 
in Jesus, December 29, 1913, being 19 
years and 17 days of age. 

She left father, mother, and two 
brothers. Gertrude joined the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South, when 



9 years old. Hers was a genuine 
Christian life. She was always inter- 
ested in the Lord's work. Her in- 
fluence was on the side of right from 
a child, being a leader of others when 
a child. 

As a daughter, she was obedient and 
loving. As a sister, she was affec- 
tionate and loyal. A spirit of self- 
sacrifice seemed to dominate her. When 
her mother was troubled about any- 
thing she would say: "Mother I will 
bear part of it." During her short 
illness she showed the same spirit, 
saying: "I would gladly die to save 
the soul of a loved one." 

Not only the family, but the com- 
munity is bereaved by her death. She 
will be sadly missed in the Sabbath 
school, the Epworth League and the 
hcoir in all of which she rendered 
efficient service. 

Burial services were held in Belmont 
Park Methodist church, conducted by 
her pastor, assisted by her uncle, the 
Rev. Mr. Griffith, of the Presbyterian 
church. 

She is still ours. She is not dead. 
"She has only moved to a fairer city 
than Charlotte." 

Miss Elizabeth Chapman, 
Mr. G. W. Ford, 
Rev. J. H. Bradley, 
Committee from Epworth League. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, it has pleased our heaven- 
ly Father to lay claim on one of our 
friends and co-workers, Mrs. Gertrude 
Tate, taking her from our midst; 
therefore be it resolved: 

First, that her sudden departure 
leaves a vacancy and shadow which 
will be deeply realized by the mem- 
bers of the Forest City Methodist 
church. 

Second, that we extend to the grief- 
stricken parents and two orphan chil- 
dren our profound sympathy and a 
continuation of prayer. 

Third, that in her departure a true, 
faithful mother has gone. 

Fourth, that the Missionary Society 
will greatly miss her presence and 
help. 

Fifth, that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be spread upon the record of 
the Sunday school, a copy sent to the 
bereaved parents, a copy be given 
for publication to the North Carolina 
Advocate and the Free Press. 

Mrs. Edd Watkins, 
Miss Mae King, 
Miss Kathleen Young, 
Committee. 



No one is ever happy or contented 
long without work. 



Page Sixteen NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE January 22, 1914 



Publisher's Appeal tor Advocate Campaign 

— — 1914 



The lists for each pastoral charge have been sent out and 
are now in the hands of the pastors. If any pastor has failed to 
receive lists or if any lists received are incomplete we will 
thank them to notify the office at once so correct lists may be 
sent. 

Now is the time to press the battle. These beautiful winter 
days offer great opportunity for pastoral work and there is 
no better way to carry on your Advocate campaign than in 
connection with pastoral visiting. To present the matter of 
family worship, family reading and the general subject of 
home culture makes the pastoral visit a matter of real value 
to the home and will make the pastor feel that he is really do- 
ing something worth while for his people. Working on this 
line a pastor can almost always leave the church paper behind 
him as a permanent blessing to the home he has visited. He 
may not always find the family with the money at hand, but 
if he will take the subscription to be paid in 30 or 60 days and 
send along the name we will start the paper at once. 

If at the expiration of the 30 or 60 days the money is not 
forthcoming, all the pastor has to do is to drop a postal card 
notifying the office and the name will be charged off the ac- 
count. This is the best way to sample our people and get them 
interested in the church paper. 

Many of our people know nothing about our church paper. 
They have not even seen a copy. It would be a revelation to 
many who have never thought of it, if they could make a 
list of the really intelligent families in our city churches, as 
well as in the country, where the inmates of the home could not 
even tell the name of their Conference paper. We desire this 
year to furnish sample copies to such homes if the pastors 
will give us names and addresses, provided the pastor will fol- 
low up the samples with a diligent effort to secure them as sub- 
scribers. 

Where the pastor prefers he can arrange for a canvass 
through a committee or some representative of the church. 
For instance, a Baraca class or Philathea class will frequently 
prove a very effective helper in such work. Always give us 
time to supply at least two sample copies before the canvass is 
made. 

We are trying very hard to give our people a paper without 
so much space devoted to advertising. We hope our people 
will show their appreciation of this by increasing our circula- 
tion. In order to have a paper clear of advertising of any 
doubtful character, we have cut out from $1200. to $1500. per 
annum of our usual income from this source. We must have 
a larger income from subscriptions in order to compensate for 
this loss. 

Our Job Printing Department is run to supplement the in- 
come of the Board so as to enable them to maintain a paper of 
worthy and high standard without depending upon the income 
from advertising. We shall be glad to discard all advertising 
except schools and other church institutions if our people will 
rally to us and make it possible for us to do so. 

Last year we distributed nearly 100 sets of China as pre- 
miums mostly among our pastors. This year we want to fur- 
nish every one of them with an outfit of nice silverware. 

Series of Premiums and Prizes 

Following is an outline of our premiums and prizes to 
which there may be some additions later, and of which we hope 
in a week or two to show cuts fully illustrating each one. 
Our friends may rest assured that all the goods offered are 
genuine first class articles, and every one will appeal especially 
to a preacher's wife. While we prefer that the pastors and 
their wives take up this work and secure the premiums, yet, in 
case they do not care to they may turn it over to any members 
of the congregation who are willing to undertake it. 

List of Premiums and Prizes 

No. 1. One 26-piece Wm. Eogers Triple Plate 12 oz. Silver 
Set, consisting of one Oak or Mahogany Chest, Six Knives, 
Six Forks, Six Tablespoons, Six Teaspoons, One Sugar Bowl 
and One Butter Knife. The above will be given to the one 
who secures fifty new subscribers. 



No. 2. To the one who will secure thirty-five new sub- 
scriptions, we will give the same assortment of ware only 
without the chest. 

No. 3. One Set Eogers Triple Plate Knives and Forks 
and Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twenty-five 
new subscribers. 

No. 4. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons and one 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in fifteen new sub- 
scriptions. 

No. 5. One Set Rogers Teaspoons, one Sugar Shell, and 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twelve to fifteen 
new subscriptions. 

No. 6. To the ones who will secure ten subscriptions, we 
will give their choice of the following premiums: 

A. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons, one Set 
Rogers Nickle Silver Knives and Forks in a nice box. 

B. One Set Stag Handle Carver, consisting of Carving 
Knife, Fork and Steel. 

C. One Set Aluminum Ware, consisting of one Aluminum 
6-quart Pudding-Pan, one 5-quart Aluminum Milk Pan, one 
Aluminum Dipper, and one Aluminum Cake-Pan. 

# # # * 

In addition to the above we offer the following 
Grand Prizes 

1. To the one sending' in the largest number of new sub- 
scribers, provided the number shall not be less than 50, we 
offer, in addition to the premium, one No. 2690 Forbes Quadru- 
ple Plate Tea Set, consisting of one 2% pt. Tea Pot, one Sugar 
Bowl, one Cream Pitcher, one Spoon Holder handsomely en- 
graved, and one Butter Dish. 

2. To the one securing the second largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 40, we offer : One 
Nickle-Plated Coffee Percolator Machine, that does away 
with the tannic acid in coffee, and furnishes the pure juice 
of the coffee, especially adapted to the use of old persons 
who are deprived of the use of the beverage on account of its 
injurious effect. With this machine, you can make the best 
drip coffee in five minutes, without injurious qualities. 

3. To the one securing the third largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 30, we offer: 
One Satin-Finished Tilting Triple Plate Water Pitcher, in 
tilting frame. 

4. To the one securing the fourth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 25, we offer : One 
Housekeeper's Casserole, with nickel outside cover — a beauti- 
ful article, and suitable for anyone's table. 

5. To the one securing the fifth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 20, we offer: One 
Kitchen Set, consisting of one Meat Broiler, Ice Pick, Meat 
Fork, Basting Spoon, Butcher Knife, Bread Knife, Cleaver, 
Paring Knife, Can Opener, Bread Toaster, and one ten-hook 
rack to- hold above — eleven pieces in all. 

6. To the one securing the sixth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 15, we offer : One 
Ladies' or Gents' Pearl Handle Good Metal Pocket Knife. 

In each case it is understood that the renewals are to 
be collected and in case of the failure of any old subscriber to 
renew, a new subscriber is to be found to take the place of 
the one discontinuing. In no case can a premium or prize be 
awarded where the renewals are neglected. 

Cash must accompany each name sent in, except where 
the pastor is willing to become absolutely responsible. 

Let the work begin at once so that all may have the benefit of 
the paper for the Conference year. 

Address all correspondence regarding the above to 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



m 



m 



Doril) Carolina 



0)1i$M 




Official Organ of tte Western north &rolma £onf erence 
TOetboaist episcopal £l)urcl) f Soutl) 



Thursday, January 29, 1914 





Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 29, 1914 



♦ ♦ 

Note and Comment 

♦ » 

The Parcel Post and the Express Companies 

For years the express companies, instead of 
serving the people as public carriers should, 
have been public bosses, arrogant and exorbi- 
tant, almost beyond endurance. But a new 
day has come through the good services of the 
parcel post, the success of which has surprised 
even the most zealous advocates of this innova- 
tion of the United States postal service. The 
express companies are now seeking terms with 
the public. 

On February 1, new rates go into effect that 
equals a general reduction for all articles car- 
ried of 15 per cent., but many of the rates 
have been cut as much as 40 per cent, and 
some even more than that. And with the cut 
in freight charges will be given a more satis- 
factory service by these carriers that hitherto 
have cared nothing for the rights or wishes of 
the public. This is another evidence that com- 
petition is for the public good in some instances 
if not in all. 

# # * * 
"Peace Hath Her Victories" 

Two weeks ago the Advocate in this depart- 
ment announced the dissolution at the instance 
of the Department of Justice of the New Hav- 
en System that had put the transportation of 
New England almost wholly in the hands of 
one corporation. By the terms of the dissolu- 
tion, the Merchant and Miners Transportation 
Company, the Eastern Steamship Company, 
all the trolley systems and the Boston and 
Maine road were surrendered. As a result 
the United States government will abandon its 
suit for dissolution that it had prepared to file. 

# • # » 

Now comes the press reports that the kodak 
trust is ready to dissolve if the Department 
of Justice will agree to reasonable terms. Other 
corporations, it is said, are instituting negotia- 
tions for peace with the Department of Jus- 
tice. All of which seems to indicate that 
notice is being taken of the man in the White 
House and "big business" may yet learn that 
a brave, honest man vested with the authority 
of the American people can compel it to be 
obedient to the requirements of business and 
social righteousness. 

Jb Jfc JL . Ufc 

•Jr tp tp "Jr 

A Word about Dr. Elliott's "New Religion" 

The metropolitan dailies in their mad search 
for reading matter that will interest the pub- 
lic reverts every once in a while to some 
feature or other of Dr. Elliot 's so called ' ' New 
Religion. ' ' Even a periodical like the Literary 
Digest serves every few weeks some "New 
Religion" hash. 

It seems to us that Bishop Berry of the 
Methodist Episcopal church has spoken to the 
point in the following: 

"Why do not Dr. Elliot and his Boston 
friends suggest something new? His words 
are only a rehash of old platitudes which has 
been given currency in that quarter for years. 
I suppose it is necessary to do something peri- 
odically in defense of a religion which has no 
missionary propaganda, no reformatory power, 
has never had any message for men and women 
who have gone into the depths of sin and de- 
spair. I do not at all agree with those who 
insist that the good old Doctor is in his dotage. 
He has been and is a thinker of respectable 
ability, and his present theological vagaries are 
only the logical outcome of a system of teach- 
ing which spurns the Christ as the Redeemer of 
mankind. ' ' 

# # # # 

Our Gains for the Past Quadrennium 

In the last four years the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, according to the figures 
of the Southern Methodist Handbook, has made 
gains that should be carefully noted, in order 
to see at what points we are making the great- 
est progress. The increase in church members 
has been 168,499, in Sunday school officers, 
teachers and scholars, 245,589 ; in contributions 
for ministerial support, $907,714; in contribu- 
tions for missions and church extension (on 



regular assessments) $210,790; in number of 
houses of worship, 767 ; and in value of houses 
of worship and parsonages, $15,473,751 ; in per 
capita payment to the support of the ministry, 
an increase of $0.24 ; payment to missions and 
church extension, an increase of 8 cents per 
capita. 

Our total membership, including travelling 
and local preachers, is now 2,004,080, and the 
total enrollment of the Sunday schools reaches 
1,614,917. A gain of a quarter of a million 
in the Sunday schools during the last four 
years is one of the most encouraging features 
of this qaudrennial report. Another satisfac- 
tory showing is the building of a new church 
every two days, which does not include the 
erection of new churches in the place of old 
ones, or the improvement of existing churches. 

With the South 's large increase in wealth, 
the figures showing the per capita gain in con- 
tributions do not indicate any marked growth 
of liberality by the church as a whole. 

# # # # 
"Last Chance Boy's Club" 

Twenty-seven miles from Reno, Nevada, Up- 
ton Sinclair and Jack London have selected a 
ranch upon which they plan to establish the 
"Last Chance Boys' Club." The purpose of 
this reform experiment is to take the worst 
boys to be found and to try to make valuable 
citizens of them. 

Twelve boys, judged by various moral stan- 
dards, pronounced the worst among nine thou- 
sand who were real competitors for the posi- 
tion, have been selected for the test of con- 
verting boys, rated at more than eighty-seven 
bad, into useful citizens. Of the dozen, seven 
are Americans, three Hungarians, one a Jew, 
and one an Italian. If the efforts with these 
boys prove successful, the promoters of this 
project will start one of the biggest bad-boy 
reclamation clubs in the country. 

# * # # 

The Liquor Question Before the Virginia Law- 
makers 

The legislature of Virginia has a bill pend- 
ing that would give the people, upon petition 
of one fourth of the legal votes, the right to 
vote for statewide prohibition. On January 
22nd, the measure passed the Lower House of 
the General Assembly by a vote of 75 to 19 
and is now before the Senate. The same meas- 
ure passed the House of Delegates two years 
ago, but was defeated in the Senate. What the 
Senate will do this time remains to be seen. 
The liquor interests are strongly entrenched 
in Virginia, but the people are going to win 
at no distant day. 

*#*.'• 

Anti-Trust Legislation Pending in Congress 

In less than eleven months a Democratic 
President and Congress have accomplished two 
tremendously important pieces of constructive 
legislation. They have revised the tariff down- 
ward, and enacted the new Currency Law. 
There remains one other great task for the 
President and the majority in Congress, and 
that is to give the country the proper trust 
legislation. 

On January 20th, in the presence of the 
Senate, the House of Representatives and vis- 
itors that packed the galleries of the House 
Chamber, President Wilson delivered a special 
message to Congress in which he pointed out 
what ought to be done to properly regulate the 
big corporations of the country. 

The President's message suggests the pro- 
hibiting of interlocking directorates, the estab- 
lishing of an Interstate Trade Commission, 
which would indicate to business what is a vio- 
lation of the law and also inform the public 
whether business is being legally conducted. 
Instead of punishing business for violations of 
the law, the President would have the individ- 
uals who manage the business punished — a most 
effective method. Multi-millionaires do not en- 
joy wearing prison stripes. The President 
intimates that it might be well to give 
to business injured by the illegal conduct of 
corporations the right to collect damages out 
of such corporations when their guilt has been 
once legally established, without showing it in 
each particular case. 

These are the most important suggestions of 
President Wilson, and will be written doubt- 



less, into the laws of the country, practically, 
as the President indicates. For President Wil- 
son has been the real leader in all the impor- 
tant legislation of the present Congress. 

# * * # 

It Begins to Look Like Real Federation 

At its meeting in Nashville, Term., on Jan- 
uary 23rd, the federal council of the Northern 
and Southern branches of the Methodist church 
decided that a conference committee of three 
for each town or city in which both branches 
of the church have work, shall be elected by 
the conference concerned, and this committee 
shall become a board of arbitration to settle 
any disputes or allay friction that may arise 
betweeD the two churches. In case of dissatis- 
faction on the part of either.church, the right 
of appeal to the federal council is granted. 

It is provided, also, that "where either 
branch of the Methodist church is doing the 
work expected of Methodism in the community, 
the other branch shall be restrained from estab- 
lishing a church there or trying to operate it 
in any way in that community." 

This is an effort to put a stop to the friction 
that exists in many places between the two 
branches of Methodism, and also to prevent the 
establishment of rival altars. These are ends 
to be devoutly desired. If once accomplished, 
these results will do more to hasten organic 
union than all the fraternal pleas that have 
been made upon General Conference platforms. 

Some of us are sincerely in favor of the two 
great bodies of Methodism being united, and we 
heartily approve of every honorable means that 
will further the cause of organic union. While 
other agencies are at work, let us have appoint- 
ed by the General Conference a commission on 
organic union which shall take the matter up 
with a like commission of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

Emperor William as a Wood Chopper 

' ' Chopping, sawing and carrying wood from 
one to three hours a day ' ' is the German Em- 
peror 's prescription for nervousness and for 
the reduction of surplus flesh. The Kaiser has 
his woodyard in the gardens of San Souci Pal- 
ace, Potsdam. 

The school boys who have to cut stove wood 
of evenings after school may be able to find a 
grain of comfort in the fact that the strenuous 
Emperor of the German people cuts wood for 
his health, so fond is he of this occupation 
which few American boys have ever learned to 
enjoy. 

# # # # 
Senate Passes Alaska Railway Bill 

By a vote of 46 to 16 the Senate, January 24, 
passed a bill that directs the President to buy 
or construct a railroad of one thousand miles 
in Alaska, at a cost not exceeding $40,000,000. 
Into this fund shall go 75 per cent, of all mon- 
eys secured through the sale of public lands in 
Alaska, or of coal and mineral rights. The 
machinery used in the construction of the Pan- 
ama Canal is made available for the construc- 
tion of the proposed railway. 

The bill places upon the President the re- 
sponsibility of selecting the route from the 
tidewat er to the interior of Alaska, also to con- 
struct, buy or lease such lines as are necessary 
to constitute the route of travel as proposed by 
the government. A similar bill is pending in 
the House. 

# # # • 

Catholic Church to Use $100,000 in North Car- 
olina 

Cardinal Gibbons proposes to distribute one 
hundred thousand dollars for mission work in 
North Carolina. None of it will go to educa- 
tional institutions, but will be given to strength- 
en present parishes in need of funds and to es- 
tablish new ones. 

The money comes from the estate of Miss 
Ella Andrews, who, died in Norfolk a few weeks 
ago, leaving to Cardinal Gibbons $265,000 to 
distribute for mission work in the dioceses of 
Richmond, North Carolina and West Virginia, 
with instructions to the Cardinal as to how he 
should disburse this large legacy. 



"Pray without ceasing" means that we 
should always maintain the prayerful spirit. 



HortD Carolina Christian Advocate 

ESTABLISHED 1855 



h. m. blair. Editoi Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference oj the M. E. Church, South $1.50 p« Annum in Adv«n Cl 



Volumn LIX GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 29, 1 91 4 Number 4 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 

Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



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office. 



■«- 




EDITORIAL 


t 




GLEAMS OF LIGHT 





They say that to a man lost on the prairie in 
a dark and stormy night, nothing thrills the 
heart so much as the glimmer of a distant light. 
This is the assurance of a human habitation and 
brings hope of rest and shelter from the storm. 
It helps the struggling one to hold out a little 
longer. So of the mariner at sea, when, by the 
winds and waves, he is driven in the darkness. 
So also of one whose task sometimes seems too 
great for him — when nerve and brain and heart 
seem almost exhausted, words of cheer come like 
gleams of light. 

"We very much appreciate a number of such 
messages that have come to us recently and take 
the liberty of giving extracts from two which 
we prize very highly and which we think our 
readers will be glad to share with us. The first 
is from Dr. E. H. Rawlings, Educational Sec- 
retary of our Board of Missions, and reads as 
follows : 

"My Dear Brother:— I cannot go into the 
new year without writing you a word of ap- 
preciation in regard to the North Carolina 
Christian Advocate. Your paper has been a 
welcome visitor to my desk during the past 
year, and I have read its contents always with 
the keenest interest. Then, too, when I have 
asked for space to be used in connection with 
my work as Educational Secretary of the Board 
of Missions, my request has always received 
courteous consideration. ' ' 

The other letter is from our staunch layman, 
brother J. L. Nelson, of Lenoir, who, in a pri- 
vate letter, takes occasion to say : 

" I hope you will allow me this opportunity 
to express to you my appreciation of the ex- 
cellent paper you are giving us in the Advo- 
cate. Its editorials are timely and 'speak forth 
the words of soberness and truth' in no uncer- 
tain 'sound. The reading matter it contains 
is wholesome and instructive. The information 
it gives as to what our church has done, is do- 
ing and ought to do in the future is essential 
to intelligent progress and to the loyalty of 
our people, and a copy of it should be in every 
Methodist home in our Conference. 

It is my opinion that if our pastors will avail 
themselves of the suggestions set forth in the 
Publisher's Appeal and work along these lines 
that the lists apportioned to our different charg- 
es can, in most, if not all, instances be secured. 

In this enlightened Christian age, when there 
are opportunities all about us to prevent it, 



it should not be said as it was said in ancient 
days: 'My people are destroyed for lack of 
knowledge.' " 

We trust that this heartening message from 
Brother Nelson will prove a word in season, 
and that it will give real inspiration, as it 
should, to our pastors and leading laymen ev- 
erywhere in their purpose to place the Advocate 
in every home. There is nothing more clearly 
manifest today than that the Lord's people, as 
of old, perish for lack of knowledge. The weak- 
est point in all the organization of the church 
is its crude provision for publicity. The peo- 
ple know but little of what the church is try- 
ing to do, and are incapable of being mustered 
as a body into the service of the Kingdom. 

The attitude of the church toward its press 
has been, and is yet, a sort of open bid for men 
to exploit the church in their own interest, or 
else sacrifice health and life in the effort to 
furnish good, clean periodicals in spite of indif- 
ference. While the work is hard and the situ- 
ation not without its discouragements, the peo- 
ple of our church in Western North Carolina 
show signs of awakened interest in the Advo- 
cate. We are praying that it may result in 
sending us far up the hill this year toward our 
goal of a paper in every family. 



THE MISSIONARY COLLECTIONS 

The Advocate would call attention this week 
to the following paragraph in the report of the 
Board of Missions as adopted at our last An- 
nual Conference : 

' ' We again urge the Every Member Canvass 
and early collections. We gain nothing and 
lose much by putting off our missionary collec- 
tions to the last of the year. We ask that all 
the domestic missionary assessments be collect- 
ed and paid in January and February, and the 
foreign in March and April." 

It is so easy for us to adopt resolutions like 
this and forget to see that an honest effort is 
made to carry them into effect. We say, and 
do not. Such a habit is bad in more ways 
than one. In the first place it has very much 
the same effect upon the work and business of 
our Boards as a number of delinquent busi- 
ness concerns have upon the trade and com- 
merce of the country. We all know very well 
what becomes of the business of the country 
when the majority of those who have made 
promises to pay at a given time fail to do so. 
It stops the wheels of commerce and precipi- 
tates a panic, causing stagnation and ruin in all 
lines of trade. 

There are many of our ministers and laymen 
who have not fully realized that our mission- 
ary enterprise is a vast business undertaking, 
to which the Board sustains a relation very sim- 
ilar to that of the Board of Directors of a great 
corporation, and that a failure to keep our 
promises is a very serious matter indeed. The 
men and women, schools, hospitals, etc. that 
they have in charge are compelled to have 
money for their support, and when we as a 
church fail to respond in keeping with our 
promise there is embarrassment of a very se- 
rious nature, and the only thing the Board can 
do is to borrow money from the banks to keep 
the work going while waiting for us to meet 
the pledge which we have solemnly made. 

It is a matter of fact that our Boards, from 
year to year, spend thousands of dollars in 
meeting the interest account on our deferred 
payments. This matter has not been impressed 
upon our people as it should. 

In the second place, the subjective effect of 
saying and doing not is bad. There are well- 
meaning individuals everywhere that have gone 
to sleep on their promises till they have no con- 
science any more in such matters. They have 



no conception of the enormity of the sin of 
promising to pay at a given time and straight- 
way forgetting the promise, leaving those 
dependent upon their promise to shift for them- 
selves. Our whole church needs waking up to 
the fact that we are sinning against ourselves 
as well as against our fellowmen and against 
God, when we, by resolution, agree to pay our 
missionary money at a given period and fail to 
do so by many months. Let us lay this matter 
upon our consciences. 

The pastors are not infrequently at fault in 
this matter because of a timidity about present- 
ing the matter at the time. The Advocate 
would urge that next Sunday the pastors every- 
where lay this obligation upon the hearts of the 
people and act at once. 

For years it has been the policy of our church 
to develop the missionary spirit in our Sunday 
schools, by using the first Sunday in each month 
as a day of special education on the subject of 
missions and allowing the collection of that day 
to augment the collections for missions. An 
average of ten cents per member for our more 
than 80,000 Sunday school scholars on each 
first Sunday would give us over $96,000. for 
missions, and who will say that, with diligent 
effort and organization with this in view, 
such a thing is impossible? It is a shame that 
we groan over our assessments when we look at 
the matter thus and see what splendid oppor- 
tunities we are throwing away for lack of de- 
termined organized effort. 

The Virginia Conference last year raised 
$89,000. on an assessment of $33,000., mainly 
through specials taken through the Sunday 
schools. 

Let the pastors sound the keynote next Sun- 
day if possible, and let us this year redeem 
our pledge. 



GLIMPSES 

Those who are striving so hard to make of the 
Sabbath a day of sport and frolic will find 
themselves very tired after awhile, and will 
discover that no man can violate such a natural 
law with impunity. The body will be weary 
and the soul will be very hungry. 

A New York school man would make the 
school a social center for the community. 
Among many forms of recreation he suggests 
the dance for one evening in each week. How 
does this strike those who want a Christian 
education for their children? 

* # # # 

The social service which is so much in the 
public mind today is one of the new evidences 
of Christianity. If there had been no gospel 
that saves men from sin there would be no social 
service calling for emancipation from social 
wrongs. 

The Sunday paper is not calculated to sharp- 
en one's appetite for the sermon. 

• * # » 

A pastor was recently reported to have 
changed his subject after entering his pulpit be- 
cause he found that a certain man of distinction 
was in his congregation. Commenting, the ed- 
itor of the New York Christian Advocate says : 

To change his subject after he has entered his 
pulpit is one of the most stupid things that any 
preacher could be betrayed into doing. If he 
has labored diligently on his sermonic prepara- 
tion and has prayerfully beaten out the gold 
which he proposes in the name of the Lord to 
give his people, it is little short of infidelity for 
him to substitute an impromptu deliverance. He 
should remember that God alone is great. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 29, 1914 



» 

Contributions j 

♦ « » 

CHURCH EXTENSION AID 

The Annual Meeting of the Board of Church 
Extension will be held about May 1st. This 
is the meeting where applications for aid are 
considered. That those interested may know 
exactly how to proceed, the following is sub- 
mitted : 

1. All applications must be made upon the 
printed form provided by the Board for that 
purpose. These application blanks may be had 
without cost by applying to this office. 

2. After the application has been properly 
prepared, it should be sent at once to the Sec- 
retary of the Annual Conference Board as 
the following rule provides: 

"Every application for consideration at the 
hands of the General Board must first receive 
the approval of the Board of Church Exten- 
sion of the Conference from which it comes, 
and said approval must be given at the reg- 
ular meeting of said Board or of its Executive 
Committee held in the month of March. Said 
boards and committees shall consider all the 
applications from their respective Conferences 
and forward such as they approve so as to 
reach the Board's office at Louisville, Ky., 
by April 1st of each year. Each application 
so approved must have the action of the Con- 
ference Board written therein, certified by the 
President and Secretary, and all the applica- 
tions from a given . Conference must be by the 
Conference Board, graded and marked in the 
order of their relative importance, and the 
Secretary is hereby directed not to put on the 
calendar any application not in conformity with 
this rule." 

3. The mid-year meetings of the Confer- 
ence Boards or their Executive Committees 
are held in March. Do not fail to have your 
applications in the hands of your Conference 
Board Secretary by March first. 

4. Personal representation in the interest of 
applications by other than members of the 
Board is not permitted, as the following rule 
declares : 

"The Board has not time to hear oral argu- 
ments or statements in behalf of applicants, 
and while considering applications for aid, its 
doors are closed. Representations other than 
those contained in the application can be made 
in writing or through members of the Board. 
A different rule would be obviously unfair to 
applicants too far away or too poor to send 
representatives. ' ' 

5. The demands upon the Board have been 
so numerous and so urgent that over-appropria- 
tion has resulted. The fiscal year will close 
with many unpaid grants on the book which 
must be taken care of out of next year's re- 
ceipts. The Board at its closing session last 
May, having knowledge of this fact, adopted 
the following: 

' ' In view of the fact that the conditions which 
have confronted the Board at this meeting 
have caused us to make appropriations largely 
in excess of the amount of money likely to be 
available during the coming year; and, in view 
of the fact that the next annual meeting of this 
Board will be the last for the quadrennium for 
which we were elected to serve; and, in view 
of the further fact that the Board is not a 
self-perpetuating organization, 

Resolved, That we hereby declare our purpose 
to limit the appropriations at the next meet- 
ing to the amount of money that is then report- 
ed by our Executive Committee as probably 
available for that purpose, to the end that the 
new Board, which will be elected by the next 
General Conference, may not be embarassed in 
the beginning of its administration by the ne- 
cessity of carrying over large grants which 
have been made by this Board. 

In order that we may be able to carry out 
this purpose without injury to the building 
operations of our Church, we earnestly request 
our Bishops, Presiding Elders, Pastors and 
Conference Boards of Church Extension to dis- 
courage applications for aid except in cases 
where serious injury would result from delay. 



In view of the fact that 192 out of the 327 
applications of this year were by churches 
which have heretofore received aid through as- 
surances that the grant would make possible 
the completion of the enterprise free from 
debt, be it hereby declared to be the policy of 
the Board to refuse to make grants in such 
cases, unless it can be clearly shown that the 
failure to carry out the assurances has been 
due to uncontrollable circumstances. 

And in view of thy fact that we are con- 
stantly asked for large sums to relieve emer 
gencies, occasioned by large debts, be it hereby 
Resolved, That we urge all in authority to 
carefully guard against extravagant enterpris- 
es, and to enforce more strictly the law pro- 
vided in paragraph 447 of our Book of Disci- 
pline." 

For further information, application blanks, 
etc., address W. . McMurry, Corresponding 
Secretary, 1025 Brook Street, Louisville, Ky. 



PROMOTION IN THE KINGDOM OF GOD 

Olin P. Ader 

What is the true principle of promotion in 
the church and in the kingdom of God? To 
find this principle and to stick to it is to be 
a true man of God. To neglect or reject this 
principle is to undo one's self, is to unhitch 
one's self from the chariot of God; it is more, 
it is to do violence to a fundamental law in 
the kingdom of God. 

One of the finest things in the world is the 
inspiring possibility of eternal progress. It 
is not wrong for a Christian man to desire 
and to see promotion in life. But this fine 
passion if a progressive spirit may be and often 
is prostituted. 

There is one method in the world of seeking 
promotion that we need to guard against es- 
pecially, and that is the effort to secure pro- 
motion through the arbitrary action of a friend 
— that is, to secure promotion on the principle 
of favoritism. Now it is fine to have friends 
and to enjoy their favor when it comes to 
securing a position. This counts powerfully 
in the ways of this world, in politics, etc. It 
is fine too to be able to make friends and to 
enjoy their favor. He who is lacking in this 
is poor indeed, and is lacking in one of the 
finest qualities of the human spirit. But to 
set up the principle of arbitrary personal fav- 
oritism against the true principle of promotion 
is a fearful blunder, a subtle sin that in our 
Methodist system young preachers are especi- 
ally subject to. 

The disciples made the same mistake. They 
fancied that it was merely a matter of favor- 
itism on the Messiah's part as to who should 
have the highest place in His kingdom, soon 
to be set up, as they supposed. But the Mas- 
ter cut short their conceit and shows that 
character, childlike and true, determines one's 
place in the kingdom of God. 

Some people seem to think that it is the 
arbitrary personal favoritism of God that fixes 
the destiny of the soul in eternity. This is 
the old error trying to do business "beyond 
the Jordan." 

Character determines destiny here and ev- 
erywhere. ''God is no respecter of persons." 
Peter found that out once for all. (Acts 10: 
34). 

Character is what a man is and has become 
under the tuition of God with all the teachers 
that God has given him in his development. 
Every man has a chance to grow into Godlike, 
Christlike, childlike greatness under the gen- 
tle care of God. "Thy gentleness hath made 
me great," says David (2 Sam. 22:36). This 
greatness in character is David's everlasting 
crown. 

"So nigh is grandeur to our dust, 
So near is God to man." 
He who "prays as if all depended on God" 
and works as if all depended on him" and 
counts upon God to promote him into the 
truest, noblest character and capacity, and 
so through that into the lowliest places of 
highest service, counts well; but, prithee, Pe- 
ter, James and John, let us not ask, or ex- 
pect, the Master to promote us just as a mere 
matter of arbitrary, personal favoritism, and 
thus violate a fundamental law in the King- 
ship of God. 



CHRISTIAN LIFE 
The Pharisee and the Publican 

The Publican had made a deep discovery. 
He smote on his breast, as if to indicate that 
■he knew his troubles lay deeper than his ac- 
tions. The seat of the trouble was in the 
heart. Until we make this discovery we will 
never offer the penitent prayer of the Publi- 
can. The prayer we need to make is for the 
cleansed heart. We cannot purify the water 
in the well by painting the pump. "Create 
in me a clean heart, 0 God," is the prayer 
that brings the blessing. 

Let us look at this moving picture once 
more. The Pharisee prayed, asking for noth- 
ing, confessing nothing, desiring nothing, leav- 
ing the temple as proud and •self-satisfied as 
when he entered it, and "he had his reward." 
The Publican, unnoticed by any but God, goes 
on his way "justified" by faith, and with a 
heavenly peace in his soul. There was no 
change outwardly. He was still a Publican, 
and the same old temptations were to meet 
him, and new ones, but he has a new spirit 
in which to meet them. He is a new man in 
a new moral world. Which of these two men 
knew most of God? To which one of us is 
the prayer of the Publican unsuited? Let us 
make this prayer our own, "God be mericful 
to me the sinner," and like this man, confess- 
ing our sins, go from His presence believing, 
trusting, and satisfied. — Exchange. 

•ff 4£ 45- 

A Sermon That Was a Life Line 

One Sunday evening, in his own church, 
Dr. Hall was delivering a written sermon on 
temptation, and suddenly felt that his address 
was unlike his usual style, and too argumenta- 
tive for many of the people. He suddenly 
paused, looked away from his manuscript, and, 
appealing with a loud voice to the more dis- 
tant of his audience, said: ''Perhaps among 
those pressing in at the door there may be 
some one so miserable as to think of throwing 
himself over yonder bridge, saying, perhaps, 
'It's too late to tell me not to enter into temp- 
tation. I have done it; I am in it. There ia 
no hope for me. ' Stop ! Stop ! There is 
hope. Christ died for thee. He will pardon, 
he will save, even thee!" A few weeks after- 
ward one of the members of his church told 
him that he had called to see a woman who 
had made up her mind to throw herself over 
the Blackfriars Bridge, one Sunday evening, 
but she thought it was too light and a police- 
man might stop her; so in order to wait for 
the darkness she went into the church and 
stood in the crowd inside the door. Standing 
there it seemed to her that Dr. Hall had called 
to her directly to stop, and come to Christ, 
and she went back to her home to pray, and 
became a true and happy Christian. — Louis 
Albert Banks. 

# # # # 
Good-bye to Mother 

Representative Norris, of Nebraska, was on 
a street car one Sunday when there entered 
a white-haired woman, a man of, say, thirty, 
and a well-dressed young woman. The con- 
versation soon made it apparent that the young 
man and his mother were from a farm, and 
that they were visiting Washington for the 
first time. The young woman was the sister 
of the young man. The man was starting 
for home, leaving his mother to visit longer. 

The car was crowded when it came to a 
transfer point. Here the young man was to 
leave his mother and sister. He arose, took 
up his bag, and turned to kiss his mother. 
She stood up and threw her arms about his 
neck. For some minutes she delivered a last 
motherly message. 

"All out for Union Station!" shouted the 
conductor with his hand on the bell cord. 

Embarrassed, the young man still held his 
arm about his mother's waist. 

"Start the car, conductor," said a man in 
a silk hat. "It's church time now." 

Still the aged woman poured out her ad- 
monitions. 

"Why can't people do this sort of thing 
before they start for church?" the man with 
the silk hat grumbled. 

It had gone far enough for Mr. Norris. 



January 29, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



"Young man," he said to the farmer, "you 
just take all the time you want to say good-by 
to your mother. You don't know when you 
will say it to her for the last time. And if 
any of these people are so worried about their 
sins that they must hurry to church, why, 
they might get down on their knees right here 
and pray." — Cleveland Leader. 

* * * * 

We Must Revive the Family Altar 

It can be done. It is no greater task than 
bringing in the ''every member canvass plan" 
of collection. 

The key note of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, according to one of its eminent min- 
isters, is "Revival." The heart throb of the 
Prebyterian Church is "home religion." Min- 
isters, elders, and members rarely rise above 
the home that produces them. When the pas- 
tor gets his heart burdened with the subject, 
he can work the change. 

A cardinal point in this connection is that 
our church will make its first advance, not 
through the evangelistic arm, but through sav- 
ing all our children for our own church. The 
Kingdom was projected along that line in 
the period before the coming of Christ. 

The spiritual descendants of Abraham today 
number a numerous progeny. If all the chil- 
dren of a given home could be saved for a 
given church, they would ultimately take the 
world. The two ways to compass that end 
are by the revival of home religion and cate- 
chetical instruction in the home. These two 
things make members who are such from prin- 
ciple, not from prejudice. — Christian Observer. 

Experience of William Carvosso 

One of the most striking examples of what 
God can do for a man without natural talents, 
without education, and without worldly advan- 
tages of any kind, is found in the "Memoirs of 
William Carvosso." 

Truly converted from a life of sin at twen- 
ty-one years of age, Carvosso soon afterward 
sought for and obtained a still deeper Chris- 
tian experience, after which he became a great 
means of blessing to thousands of persons with 
whom he prayed and conversed personally. 
He was one of the greatest soul winners of 
the early Methodist Church. He served as 
class leader in the Methodist Church in Eng- 
land for over sixty years. He learned to 
write after he was sixty-five years of age. 

Of his deeper experience, Carvosso says : 
"What I now wanted was 'inward holiness;' 
and for this I prayed and searched the Scrip- 
tures. Among the number of promises, which 
I found in the Bible, that gave me to see it 
was my privilege to be saved from sin, my 
mind was particularly directed to Ezekiel 36 : 
25-27 This is the great and pre- 
cious promise of the eternal Jehovah, and I 
laid hold of it, determined not to stop short 
of my privilege; for I saw clearly the will of 
God was my sanctification. ... At length, 
one evening, while engaged in prayer meeting, 
the great deliverance came. I began to ex- 
ercise faith, by believing, 'I shall have the 
blessing now.' Just at that moment a heaven- 
ly influence filled the room; and no sooner 
had I uttered or spoken the words from my 
heart, 'I shall have the blessing now,' than 
refining fire went 'through my heart — illumi- 
nating my soul — scattered its life through ev- 
ery part, and sanctified the whole. ' I then 
received the full witness of the Spirit that 
the blood of Jesus Christ had cleansed me 
from all sin. I cried out, 'This is what I 
wanted ! I have now got a new heart. ' . . . 
0 what boundless, boundless happiness there 
is in Christ, and all for such a poor sinner 
as I am! This happy change took place in 
my soul March 13, 1772." — Experiences of 
Famous Christians. 

# # # # 

D. L. Moody's Faith 

With Mr. Moody God was ever present. 
Wanting anything, he would tell God of it 
just as he would a friend at his side. Here 
is a nincident that showed the mighty force 
and trust in God that made him laugh at im- 
possibilities. During one of his campaigns for 
funds there was a certain wealthy builder that 



he greatly desired to enlist. The amount con- 
sidered as his share was $10,000. When call- 
ing on him the gentleman said to Mr. Moody : 
"I have decided to give $5,000, and will go 
upstairs for a pen." Down upon his knees 
went Moody, crying unto God to lead his 
friend to sign for the full amount. In a few 
moments the gentleman returned saying : 
' 'While I was upstairs something said to me, 
"Make the amount $10,000,' and I have done 
so." 

Blessed is the Christian worker who can so 
pray that those for whom he prays will be 
instantly moved to say, "Something said to 
me." That still small voice would soon con- 
quer the world if men could only be made to 
hear it. — Michigan Christian Advocate. 



BIGGER AND BETTER EVERY YEAR 

The Southern Assembly at Waynesville, N. 
C, was projected as an institution for the phy- 
sical, social, mental and spiritual uplift of the 
people called Southern Methodists, who con- 
template with legitimate pride the fact that 
they represent a vast territory and a great 
church with more than two million members 
and five million church population, and with 
great enterprises which are ever growing great- 
er. Therefore the Southern Assembly was pro- 
jected on a big scale, a scale that will require 
not simply years but decades and decades for 
development and completion. 

The public was surprised when they looked 
upon the Assembly last summer and saw that 
so much had been done. They were somewhat 
dazed by the magnitude of the plans. The huge 
dam had been completed at a cost of nearly 
$100,000. The lake had spread for miles like 
a silver mirror between the smiling wooded hills, 
and gave back here and there the reflection of 
some majestic mountain peak. All over the 
crests and along quiet streams serpentine ave- 
nues, walks and drives had begun to trail. A 
magnificent auditorium, with a seating capacity 
for four thousand and nestling on the lakeside, 
had been constructed. Numerous picturesque 
cottages, beautified by the first roses of summer, 
had been planted on the hilltops and on the 
shady slopes. A resting place for the large 
modern hotel, from whose extensive plaza one 
will look down into the tranquil water, had 
been prepared. The attractive depot of the 
Southern Railway which has entered so heartily 
into the spirit and plans of the Assembly, has 
been constructed. It was all an inspiring won- 
der. Yet it "was plainly and impressively seen 
that it was only a beginning. 

Visitors this summer will be surprised at the 
progress that will have been made since last 
summer. The lake will be more beautiful. A 
proud steamer for passengers from the station 
will plow the waters. The grass will more lux- 
uriantly adorn the slopes, the yards, and the 
edges of the drives, and it will be so much 
greener. New cottages will be seen. And yet 
the work of development will be only in its 
infancy. Only our children and grandchildren 
will have the opportunity of looking upon the 
Southern Assembly in its completed glory. 

We wonder if Southern Methodists are really 
beginning to take in the fact that the Southern 
Assembly is their own institution and not the 
institution of the loyal, far-sighted men who, 
through pure love for their church, projected it. 
If Southern Methodists have not taken in this 
fact, the light should break in on them at once. 
If there has been the slightest suspicion that 
the projectors have been doing all this great 
work for their own interests, this suspicion 
should vanish. There is not the slightest foun- 
dation for it. The projectors did not begin 
their work with the expectation of making a 
cent for themselves. They have not made a 
cent. They have made, however, financial and 
other sacrifices in order to establish a great 
institution for Southern Methodists. The South- 
ern Assembly is ours, not theirs. Shall we not 
get this fact firmly fixed in our minds ? If we 
do, there will be such a co-operation on the part 
of Southern Methodists that the rapidity of 
the Assembly 's growth will be a marvel. 

There was an important meeting in Nash- 
ville a few days ago. There were present Sup- 
erintendent Cannon, Bishop Atkins, Mr. John 
R. Pepper, Dr. George Stuart, and the secre- 
taries of our various educational boards. They 



met to make preparations for the meetings to 
be held at the Southern Assembly next sum- 
mer. The whole situation was carefully and 
prayerfully canvassed. It was determined to 
give Southern Methodists an opportunity of at- 
tending next summer at Lake Junaluska the 
greatest meetings so far known in the history 
of our church. 'Better and bigger every year" 
is the motto of those in charge. The Confer- 
ence of the Epworth League will be held July 
15th-23rd; that of the Sunday School, July 
24th-August 2nd; of the Educational Board, 
August 3rd-6th ; Mission Board, Aiigust 7th- 
16th; Bible Conference, August 16th-23rd ; Con- 
ference of Deaconesses, August 24th-26th. No 
pains will be spared to make these occasions 
full of interest and profit. The most capable 
men and women of the whole country will be 
selected for the programs. There will be lec- 
tures, concerts, and other entertainments of 
the very highest character. You may expect a 
great summer at Lake Junaluska. Look out for 
the announcements and begin at once your 
preparations to be there. — Christian Advocate. 



ORGANIC UNION 

In discussing Methodist union one should 
not ignore the ethnological features involved. 
If qualified, the negro has a logical right to 
episcopal recognition in the church to which 
he belongs. If our very dear northern breth- 
ren desire to unite with us they should make 
it possible by organizing their negro members 
into a separate church. They are showing 
race partiality if not race prejudice by trying 
to change their constitution so that when they 
elect a negro bishop he may hold only the 
negro conferences in their church. Our South- 
ern church has no serious race problem now, 
except to do more than we have been doing 
for the salvation and uplift of the negro. 

Gold Hill, N. C. Jno. M. Price. 



RUTHERFORDTON 

It was with great pleasure this writer re- 
ceived his appointment for another year to this 
charge. Last year was one of the happiest 
years of my ministry. If things continue as 
they have begun I am expecting to be able 
to say at the close of the year that it is the 
happiest of all. I want to recite some of the 
things that have made my stay so happy, and 
of course I must confine myself to the more 
recent events and kindnesses. The Senior Phi- 
lathea class gave me a nice Masonic fob. A 
number of the Gilkey brethren gave me a fine 
rain coat. The teachers and pupils of the 
graded school gave me a silver handled um- 
brella. Then came a large list of other gifts 
just as highly appreciated. As a cilmax of 
all this the Rutherfordton church gve us the 
very biaggest pounding we ever had. Added to 
this was a nice new year's box from Gilboa. 

Our first quarterly conference was held last 
Saturday and Sunday. Brother Gay was pres- 
ant and in his kind, considerate way presided. 
The stewards had their yearly meeting and 
were good to their preacher to the tune of an 
increase of $50.00 on salary, making the sal- 
ary now $1,000.00. This step on the part of 
the board makes Rutherfordton rank now 
among our best charges. 

To the host of friends of Rev. J. R. Scroggs, 
I take this method of stating that he has been 
here in the hospital since Sunday, the 11th. 
His trouble at first was sciatica. The treatment 
of this developed kidney and bladder disease, 
and he felt it best to come here. He has not at 
any time been seriously ill. Dr. Henry Norris, 
of the hospital force, assures me that he will 
be able to send him home in a few days. 

Albert Sherrill. 



There is nothing that makes the seasons and 
the year so interesting as to watch, and especial- 
ly to keep record of, the changes by which na- 
ture makes the ebb and flow of the great ocean 
of sunshine which overspreads the earth. — Ol- 
iver Wendell Holmes. 



"If we only strive to be pure and true, 

To each of us all there will come an hour 
When the tree of life shall burst into flower, 
And rain at our feet a glorious dower 

Of something grander than ever we knew. ' ' 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 29, 1914 



» + 

J From the Field 

» 

Notes and Personals 

— Rev. A. C. Swafford, pastor of the Morgan- 
ton circuit, was the recipient of a "severe 
pounding" last week. 

— Eev. C. S. Kirkpatrick, of Mooresville, vis- 
ited and addressed the Epworth League in 
High Point last week. 

— The Methodists of Sanford are preparing 
to erect a new house of worship which will 
cost, it is estimated, about $20,000. 

— The Mangum Street church, Durham, has 
raised $3,500 for the erection of a new church 
on a new site recently purchased. 

— Our people in Danbury have disposed of 
their parsonage property and will erect a new 
home for the preacher at an early date. 

— Rev. and Mrs. W. L. Sherrill and their son, 
Mr. H. C. Sherrill, left Charlotte on Wednesday 
of last week for an extended visit to Florida 
and Cuba. 

— Mrs. C. C. Spainhour, a faithful and devot- 
ed member of Mount Pleasant church, in Stokes 
county, died at her home in Winston-Salem on 
Tuesday of last week. 

— Rev. R. L. Davis, Superintendent of the 
North Carolina Anti-Saloon League, spent last 
Sunday in Leaksville and Spray, speaking three 
times during the day. 

- — Mr. Robert L. Keesler, who for fourteen 
years has been organist at Trinity church, Char- 
lotte, has accepted a similar place with Main 
Street church, Gastonia. 

— Mr. J. W. Flynt, a highly respected citizen 
of Forsyth county and a faitful member of our 
church at Walkertown, died at his home near 
Belews Creek on January 11th. 

— The Woman's Missionary Society of the 
North Carolina Conference was in session at 
Memorial church, Durham last week. There 
was a large attendance and much interest. 

— Rev. R. L. Ferguson, pastor of Southside, 
Winston-Salem, was a pleasant caller at the Ad- 
vocate office on Monday afternoon. He was on 
his way for a visit of a few days to Oxford. 

— We learn with much pleasure that the con- 
dition of Rev. J. R. Scroggs, presiding elder of 
the Shelby District, is very much improved. A 
host of friends will rejoice at this announce- 
ment. 

— Revs. J. H. Barnhardt and W .C. Jones, of 
High Point, were in the city on Thursday of 
last week and made the Advocate office a pleas- 
ant call. They report everything in hopeful 
condition in the young city. 

— Bishop McCoy preached the sermon be- 
from the Woman's Missionary Conference in 
the Memorial church in Durham on last Sun- 
day morning. Another distinguished speaker 
was Mrs. Spillman, of Kentucky. 

— The Kings Mountain Herald of last week 
says : — Charles, the seven year old son of Rev. 
and Mrs. M. B. Clegg, is very sick. About six 
weeks ago he suffered an attack of pneumonia 
which had some bad after effect. 

— Rev. Frank Siler spent last Sunday in 
High Point, speaking in all our churches on 
missions. This week he is speaking each night 
in one of the churches in Salisbury and Spen- 
cer, making a campaign in behalf of missions. 

- — Rev. P. E. Parker and family were agree- 
ably surprised on Friday night of last week 
when their people called and gave them a gen- 
erous pounding. The work of the new year on 
the Thomasville circuit starts off very hopefully. 

— The Concord Times, of January 22nd, 
says : — Mr. D. B. Coltrane left this morning for 
Davidson College, where he will deliver an ad- 
dress to the Young Men 's Christian Association 
this evening. Mr. Coltrane 's subject will be, 
' ' The Business Man and Religion. ' ' 

— The West Market Street congregation of 
this city enjoyed the third of a series of sacred 
musicals on last Sunday evening. These occa- 
sions are made very attractive as the church 
enjoys the advantage of abundance of fine mu- 
sical talent and culture upon which to draw. 

— We have learned with deep regret of the 
death of Mrs. Abernethy, wife of our dear 
Brother, Rev. M. A. Abernethy, of Newton. Mrs. 
Abernethy was a woman of fine Christian char- 
acter, devoted to her church and will be greatly 



missed. May God's richest comfort abide with 
the bereaved. 

— Our people in Charlotte are planning for a 
great union protracted meeting to be held in 
Trinity church, beginning March 8th. This is 
to be a united meeting of Methodists in the 
city. Bishop Kilgo is to be the leader, and we 
trust great results may be realized. Let all the 
people work and pray for a great awakening. 

— The death of Mr. John H. Maner, who lost 
his life by a collision with the train while driv- 
ing his automobile in Thomasville on Thurs- 
day of last week, was a sad blow to his family, 
also to Prospect church, where he held his mem- 
bership and served as a faithful steward. He 
leaves a wife and two children, also an aged 
mother and one brother. 

— Bishop J. M. Walden, a venerable and 
honored member of the College of Bishops of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, died at Day- 
tonia, Florida, on the night of Jan. 21, at the 
age of 83. Bishop Walden resided in Cincin- 
nati, but was spending the winter in Florida. 
He was one of the oldest of the College of 
Bishops, and was a great and good man. 

— Just as we go to press, Wednesday morn- 
ing, we learn of the death of Mrs. A. E. Pease, 
of Asheville. Mrs. Pease was a member of Cen- 
tral church and frequently wrote for the relig- 
ious press. She was the founder of the Normal 
and Collegiate Institute and her whole life was 
one of self-sacrificing beneficence. 

— Rev. H. K. Boyer, presiding Elder of Win- 
ston district of the M. E. Church, preached a 
very impressive sermon at the M .E. Church 
here on Wednesday night of last week. This 
was his first opportunity to meet with this 
congregation. A large congregation was pres- 
ent and seemed very much impressed by his 
personality and earnestness. — Kernersville 
News. 

— A special from Topeka, Kansas, dated Jan. 
21st, says: — Only fifteen Kansas men and wo- 
men went insane last year because of the habit- 
ual use of alcoholic liquors and only six others 
gave alcohol as a contributive cause of the 
breaking down of the mind. Kansas is ' ' dry. ' ' 
In New York hospitals 31 4-10 per cent, of the 
insane patients were sent to asylums as a direct 
result of the use of liquor. 

— A good layman writing to the editor from 
Hickory, tells of a crowded house at every ser- 
vice in First church. It does not seem from 
this report that the Hickory people have lost 
interest in church going. Our correspondent 
says : ' ' Even my Amen Corner is crowded. ' ' He 
says also that under Brother Standford's lead- 
ership they are praying for and expecting a 
revival. Twenty-five have been added to the 
membeship already since Conference. 

— Rev. Dr. James Cannon spent a recent Sun- 
day in Lexington. The Dispatch of that town, 
referring to his visit, says : — ' ' Dr. J ames Can- 
non preached a strong sermon at the Methodist 
Church Sunday night. Dr. Cannon is the man 
at the head of the great Methodist Assembly 
Ground project at Waynesville and he has been 
doing fine work for it. He is a wonderful 
man, and comes just about as near deserving 
General Walser's pet 'description of 'T. R,' a 
'steam engine in breeches,' as any man in the 
land. He made a fine impression on the peo- 
ple here." 

— Mr. Dorman Thompson, of Statesville, who 
is one of our lay delegates to the General Con- 
ference, delivered an address before the Ire- 
dell County Teacher's Meeting last week, in 
which he gave them some excellent suggestions. 
The Landmark, reporting the meeting, says: 
— Mr. Dorman Thompson delivered an ex- 
cellent address on the work of th eteacher ; one 
that was high-toned and an inspiration to the 
teachers to higher things. Mr. Thompson em- 
phasized the fact that the children of the State 
are its most valuable asset and for this reason 
the public school teacher holds a most impor- 
tant place. They should teach the children the 
things that will help them in everyday life and 
stir them to higher aspirations. The teachers 
should ever strive to improve themselves, being 
learners as well as teachers, and thus become 
more efficient in their work. 

— The death of Mr. Joseph Reece Blair, a 
prominent attorney, of Troy, which occurred at 
his home at that place on Monday night of this 
week, removes another conspicuous figure from 



the political arena of North Carolina. Mr. 
Blair was a native of South Carolina, but re- 
moved with his father, the late Dr. Isaac H. 
Blair, to Monroe when but a boy. He studied 
law, and about 1886 located in the town of 
Troy, and identified himself at once with the 
community, taking great interest in politics. He 
was married in 1904 to Miss Allen, of Montgom- 
ery county, who survives him. The immediate 
cause of his death was a stroke of paralysis 
which he suffered on Saturday preceding his 
death while engaged in his duties in the court 
house in Troy. The funeral was held from Cen- 
tral church, Monroe, on Wednesday morning, 
conducted by Rev. Dr. J. H. Weaver. May God 
greatly comfort the bereaved ones. 



Leicester Circuit 

We have just closed a glorious meeting at 
Brick church. Rev. E. M. Hoyle, of Haywood 
Street, Asheville, did some great preaching for 
us. Some professed religion, several pledged 
family altars and twenty of my members pledg- 
ed to pay the tithe this year. We are planning 
to have Brother Siler ,et al, with us Feb. 19-22, 
in a general missionary rally for the whole 
circuit. Truly, J. H. Green. 



Fifty Boys Boarding in Rutherford College 
Dormitories at Less Than Six Dollars a 
Piece Per Month 

We are more than half way on our second 
hundred students this year and others coming 
in almost every day. Fifty of these boys are 
boarding in the club dormitory at less than 
$6.00 a piece per month. The board is good 
and gives satisfaction, as the patronage indi- 
cates. Let other boys take advantage of this 
economy. M. T. Hinshaw. 



Dilworth-Big Springs 

I am glad to say that the good people of 
Dilworth and Big Springs quietly submitted to 
the will of the conference, and without any un- 
usual kicking or unnecessary "pounding" re- 
ceived us as servants of the Lord, and, of course, 
raised the pastor 's salary. So, with many tokens 
for good will and manifestations of the goodness 
of God on every hand, we think we are headed 
for the report, "the best year in the history of 
this charge. ' ' 

God bless the Advocate, the editor and his co- 
laborers and everyone of her readers. 

J. O. Ervin. 



Davenport College 

A note from President Craven brings encour- 
aging news of the progress of things at Daven- 
port. The student body is now the largest it 
has been during the present administration, and 
the president says the student body is the best 
they have ever had. 

There is the most perfect harmony among 
students and between students and faculty. To 
say that this is "the best year in its history" 
is not a mere boast but a living truth, says 
president Craven. 

In very many respects Davenport College 
presents one of the finest educational opportuni- 
ties in North Carolina, and we are glad to have 
this cheering report from the president. 



Thermal City Circuit 

Please allow me space in our Advocate to give 
a short account of myself and work. It has 
been some time since I wrote to the Advocate, 
and many changes have taken place. I have 
been pastor on this work since July, 15, Bro. 
Dibble resigning at or about that time, and 
these good people began with many kindnesses 
and we are thankful to say that they have not 
ceased. We were warmly received. We have 
had a generous pounding from the Thermal 
City congregation and our work is progressing 
nicely. When we came here the preacher had 
no home. We bought a nice little cottage and 
have it nicely furnished. Did good on our 
Conference collections, and all is working beau- 
tifully. We are going to build a new church 
on this work this year, nothing preventing. 
We have live folks and good folks to serve. 
They believe in bringing Methodism and all 
good work right up to the front. We will make 
this the best year of ouy life. Pray for us. 

H. H. Mitchell. 



January 29, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



Matthews 

Perhaps a few words from the Matthews 
charge would be of some interest to some of 
the Advocate readers. We find ourselves in the 
midst of a very kind people. Upon arriving 
here, we were met by a company of the breth- 
ren and sisters who had prepared for us a 
nice super, and with it a generous pounding 
which kept us supplied for several days. Many 
material tokens of kindness have been coming 
ever since. We have received a warm welcome 
all over the charge. We are enlarging, repair- 
ing and refurnishing the parsonage at a cost of 
over $1,000.00. When we have finished this, 
we will have a good, convenient home for the 
preacher. The work is very compact, there 
being three churches on the railroad, the farth- 
est one only about six miles from the parson- 
age. While making some material parsonage, 
we are praying for an outpouring of the Holy 
Spirit upon the church. We shall not be sat- 
isfied with any thing less than a glorious re- 
vival in each church, resulting in the deepening 
of the spiritual life of the church, and the sal- 
vation of many precious souls. We are also 
repairing and repainting the church at Mat- 
thews. We are sure that this spirit of material 
development is only a forerunner of a great 
spiritual revival. Let the readers of the Ad- 
vocate pray for us. W. L. Dawson. 



A New Era in Charlotte Methodism 

On Wednesday, Jan. 21st, at 7 :30 p. m., Rev. 
Plato T. Durham, presiding elder of the Char- 
lotte district, held a joint session of the quar- 
terly conference of Charlotte Methodism. The 
meeting was held in Tryon Street church, which 
bears the distinction of the mother of Meth- 
odism in this city. 

Brother Durham stated at the outset that one 
purpose of the meeting was to bring the Meth- 
odist churches of the city closer together. He 
contended that though theoretically connection- 
al, yet practically each church stood alone. He 
made a strong appeal for a closer relationship, 
and a more united effort among our city church- 
es. With these introductory remarks, secre- 
taries were elected and the minute questions 
were answered by representatives from the va- 
rious pastoral charges. These questions 
brought to light the following interesting facts : 
The Belmont congregation is preparing to im- 
mediately replace their parsonage, which was 
recently destroyed by fire, with a three thou- 
sand dollar brick structure to be covered with 
slate. One third of this amount has been raised. 
Steps are being taken to build a parsonage for 
the Chadwick and Seversville charge. The com- 
mittee appointed by Tryon Street to select a 
lot upon which to build a church in Elizabeth 
Heights reported that no final decision had been 
reached as to location. This enterprise will be 
carried through in due time. Brother J. O. Er- 
vin made a strong plea for a new church in 
Dilworth. The location of this church seems 
problematic. The need of a new building is 
imperative. Brother Durham regards the ma- 
terial equipment of the Dilworth congregation 
as the "mired wheel" of Methodism in this 
city. The congregation has raised twelve hun- 
dred dollars as a starter for this movement ; the 
balance will be forthcoming. The spiritual 
state of the various churches appears from the 
reports of the pastors to be encouraging. Dr. 
T. F. Marr'left us in a quandary by saying: 
"The spiritual state of Trinity church is as 
good as it ever was. ' ' 

At the close of the minute business of the 
conference Brother Durham spoke of the most 
important of all considerations. He stated that 
another purpose of the meeting was to give em- 
phasis to an evangelistic movement for the en- 
tire city and district. His purpose is, working 
through the church officials first of all, to arouse 
the latent power of the five thousand Methodists 
of this city and concentrate this power upon 
the extension of the Kingdom of God. A series 
of evangelistic services will be held in Trinity 
church, beginning the second Sunday in March. 
Bishops Kilgo and McCoy or Candler will have 
charge of these services. Brother Durham will 
call all the pastors on the district into the city 
for this meeting. Other plans will be worked 
out in detail as occasion may demand. Through 
these human agencies it is believed that the 
Spirit of the living God will accomplish a great 



work. When these plans were outlined Brother 
Durham asked for an expression of approval 
and co-operation. The one hundred or more of- 
ficials present pledged to a man their loyal sup- 
port to the movement. 

Thus, with song and prayer, closed a great 
meeting; great in spirit and great in purpose. 

R. S. Howie. 



Mount Holly and Belmont 

We have been very kindly received by the 
good people of Mt. Holly and Belmont charge. 
We are pleased to serve them. The fine graded 
rock road leading from the parsonage to the 
churches is delightful to travel over. We took 
up the matter of building a new brick church 
at Mt. Holly with the congregation here last 
Sunday, and I think the vote to build, making 
provision for several Sunday school class rooms, 
was unanimous. By the summer we hope to 
have a beautiful modern church ready to occu- 
py. Brother Bowles had a strong hold on the 
membership of the charge. The people love 
him and sister Bowles. He did substantial, 
faithful work, and it is delightful to follow such 
a true, solid man. 

Brother Scroggs being sick, our first quarter- 
ly conference was postponed. He is in the hos- 
pital at Rutherfordton and hopes to be at his 
loved work very soon. So we will hold our 
first quarterly conference at South Point on 
Monday morning, February 2nd.. 

Mt. Holly, N. C. N. R. Richardson. 



Hendersonville Charge 

At our last Annual Conference at Charlotte 
we were returned to the Hendersonville charge 
for our fourth year. Our first quarterly confer- 
ence was held with Moores Grove church Dec. 
27th and 28th, with Brother C. A. Wood in the 
chair, who looked after the business of the 
church with much interest. The outlook for 
a prosporous year is encouraging, in that we 
have met with good congregations at each 
church and our people are taking great interest 
in Sunday school and church work. We note 
with special interest the prayer meetings at 
Moores Grove and Fruitland, each having Sun- 
day night meeting and midweek cottage prayer 
meeting which is bringing our people in closer 
touch with each other. 

We were not surprised when we learned that 
our big-hearted Christian people of Fruitland 
church were coming to the parsonage for a mid- 
week prayer service on New Year 's night, which 
turned out to be a generous pounding for the 
pastor and his family, for which we are very 
grateful and pray that this year may be the 
very best year in the history of the charge. 

A. L. Latham, P. C. 



An Appreciation 

Appointed to Broad River circuit some years 
ago to fill out the unexpired term of Rev. M. 
C. Fields, the writer in a few days found him- 
self in the home of Mr. J. Louis Doggett. He 
had spent but a few hours in the company of 
this godly couple till he felt that here was the 
kind of home that has made our nation great 
and given to us the finest type of that home 
beyond, ' ' where the surges cease to roll. ' ' 

Here were a husband and wife who thorough- 
ly understood and cordially loved each other. 
Here was a man who could sing with Byron as 
he drew near home at night: " 'Tis sweet to 
know there is an eye will mark my coming and 
look brighter when I come." 

Eight years ago, while busy making himself 
ready to attend the quarterly conference of the 
church he loved so devotedly, with astonishing 
suddenness a convoy of angels appeared to this 
good man and carried him away to the home of 
the soul. 

On Sunday morning, January 11th, while 
busy about the yard "Aunt Samantha" walked 
into the home to find another company of an- 
gels. This time they were come for her, and 
without a moment's hesitancy she joyfully went 
to join the Christ and her beloved husband. The 
immense throng of people from all over the 
country-side and from nearby towns who at- 
tended her funeral, attested the very high es- 
teem in which she was held. 

The honored sons and daughters, every one of 
whom gave their hearts to God and his church 



in early childhood, should be glad all their days 
and through eternity because it was given to 
them to be children of such parents. May a 
keen appreciation of such a goodly heritage 
keep them from sin and lead them to make the 
fullest consecration of all their powers to the 
conquering cause of Christ. 

J. Frank Armstrong. 



Jefferson 

We left Marshall at eight o'clock Friady 
morning, the twelfth of December. We changed 
trains at Morristown, Tenn., and at Bristol, 
Va. Bristol is partly in Tennessee and partly 
in Virginia. A long street running with the 
state line divides the town. On the Virginia 
side there are saloons in abundance. We saw 
a demijohn about six or seven feet hibh. After 
resting here awhile we took a train for Moun- 
tain City, Tenn. We reached there about seven 
o'clock P. M. This was the terminus of the 
railroad. We spent the night here. The next 
day, Saturday, 13th, we left Mound City in a 
surrey for Jefferson. The moring was quite 
cold. But the Lord gave us the best day of 
that week. The sun was soon shining warmly 
on that mountain road as we drove on toward 
Jefferson. However, much of the road was 
covered with oce — more ice than we had ever 
traveled over before. It was dangerous travel- 
ing, but God was with us and on we went. 

We stopped at Creston for dinner. This is 
where Rev. D. C. Ballard has charge at present 
and works for the Lord. He came in while we 
were eating dinner with some of his good Meth- 
odist folks. He told us of the fine people and 
delightful times that awaited us at Jefferson. 
May the Lord bless him and his good folks 
who encouraged and helped us on our way. 
We arrived at Jefferson about seven o'clock. 
We stopped in front of a house to learn where 
to find the parsonage. This happened to be 
the home of Dr. Colvard, who is one of our 
right-hand members. So his two sons went 
with us ust a few steps to the parsonage. 
One of them stepped across the street to the 
Mountain Hotel and returned with Professor 
Scott who had the key. They soon had large 
wood fires in two chimneys. While we warmed 
Professor Scott ordered supper for us at the 
hotel. Then as we looked about in the parson- 
age we saw and they told us that the ladies 
had prepared supper for us Thursday evening, 
when they expected us. So for several days 
we enjoyed the nice things which the ladies had 
left for us. 

Sunday morning, the 14th, George Todd Col- 
vard drove me out four miles to Orion to my 
appointment. That evening I preached here 
at Jefferson to a large and appreciative audi- 
ence. 

Monday, the 15th, many came in and assured 
us that they were glad to have us here. Also 
some of the stewards came in and left some 
cash as well as kind words. 

Sunday, the 21st, I preached at Pine Swamp 
and Cranberry, the two weakest points which 
we have. 

Wednesday evening, the 24th, Santa Clans 
delivered from a large tree presents to the 
Sunday school children, in the presence of a 
packed house. Also large packages were given 
to many of the poor people. 

Sunday, the 28th, I preached at Bethany 
and Mill Creek, which are two very good so- 
cieties. Large crowds greeted me at both places. 
Also the stewards inquired into our financial 
condition and made some provision for the same, 
and spoke many encouraging words to me. 
Bethany has sent out such men as T. E. Wagg, 
Tom Houck, Jim and John Green. Besides the 
many good laymen who remain to help with 
the work of the Lord there are two local 
preachers — Brother Roten, of Bethany, and 
Brother Greer, of Mill Creek ;also Professor 
Scott is a member of Mill Creek. 

Professors Scott and Eller are building up 
a good school here. If the Conference will do 
her part this school will help satisfy a long 
felt need, and start boys and girls in the way 
to make great men and women. 

Wishing for you and the Advocate another 
happy and successful year, I am sincerely, 

E. P. Stabler. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 29, 1914 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mrs. W. R. Harris, Ashevlllo, N. C. 



THE PRAYER OF LIFE 

Spirit of truth, severe and stern, 
Conquer my fancies vainly wild; 

Teach me thy ways, that I may learn 
To be an honest, useful child. 

'Spirit of courage, when I read 

My heart, and find my soul's great 
truth, 

Give me the strength to own my creed 
And trust myself — a fearless youth. 

Spirit of love, in me awake 

Such deference to the Father's plan 
That I may live for His dear sake 

And serve the world as God's good 
man. — Alice Hartich. 



The many friends of Mrs. R. L. 
Hoke, Conference Treasurer, Home De- 
partment, will be glad to know that she 
i's recovering from a very serious oper- 
ation recently performed in a hospital 
in Baltimore. Her physician, Dr. Fin- 
ney, gives every assurance of her com- 
plete restoration to health. 



The following paper was read re- 
cently at an interdenominational mis- 
sionary meeting held n the Lutheran 
church at Concord, N. C. It is sent us 
by a friend in the hope that just at 
this time when we are trying to enlist 
every woman in the church in our mis- 
sionary work it may find a response 
in the heart of some one who has not 
yet identified herself in this great work 
for the Master. 

It was written by Mrs. James F. 
Dayvault, a loyal member of the Wo- 
man's Missionary Society of Central 
church, Concord. 



JESUS IS CALLING FOR YOU AND 
FOR ME 

The year 1913 has come and gone. 
To many of us it has brought sorrow 
and isappointment; to others has come 
happiness and success. 

To those of us who have experienced 
deep sorrows, let us remember that 
sometimes our Father sends these sor- 
rows to our lives to bring us nearer 
to Him, and my prayer is that in the 
beginning of this new year 1914 the 
call of Christ will not be in vain, that 
we as a band of Christian women will 
resolve to follow where the Master 
leads. 

Let none of us think that Christ has 
no need for us— -that we are of no 
serviceto Him in this great missionary 
work. Handel, the great musician, in 
his orchtstra of a thousand instru- 
ments, could detect the absence of one 
flute or the false note of one violin. 
God ontes the lack of His humblest 
child's service. Some women fancy 
that their humility keeps them from 
work, an excuse which is vain. I am 
glad we do not have to be gifted to 
be of use in Christ's kingdom. Some 
one of authority has said: "The ser- 
vices of the one-talented million are 
more manifested in missions than the 
services of the richly endowed few." 
Our weakness is God's strength. He 
has promised for the weak that He 
will not quench the smoking flax. We 
often think, O, if we could only speak 
in public like Mr. So and So, or if we 
could lead in prayer we would be glad 
to do it. Dear sister, will you be dis- 
obedient to the call of Christ? He is 
calling you today — perhaps 'tis only 
to give a cup of water — 'speak a kind 
word or some small service for Him. 
God has wonderfully blessed the sing- 
ing of a little song or the praying of 
a simple prayer. If we love the cause 
we will not calculate the cost of the 
effort. Love helpo us to accomplish 
hard things. 

God could do without me as f can 
do without the services of my little 
girls; but what of their housewifery 
twenty years hence? Shall we be con- 
tent to be spiritual dwarfs while His 
cause suffers because of our failure 
to do our part? 



Are we doing our very best to make 
our monthly meetings interesting and 
profitable as they should be? If we 
will imagine ourselves missionaries in 
the foreign field, we can at once feel 
the inspiration that would come to 
us if we knew that each society in the 
dear home land was encouraging us 
with their prayers, their love and their 
gifts. 

Suppose we, that are mothers, were 
treated as Chinese mothers are at the 
birth of a daughter, and suppose when 
this daughter reached the tender age of 
five years, we had to submit to seeing 
her married and knew that she was 
to be subjected to all the cruel treat- 
ment which the heathen wives have 
to endure. 

If one of our very own litttle girls 
was a child widow in India would we 
not think it worth all Christendom to 
rescue her? If we, like those who are 
in darkness, had to see our loved ones 
sicken and die without the blessed 
hope of immortality, no knowledge of 
sin forgiven, or of the reunions of loved 
ones in the spirit land, would not our 
hearts ache? 

Horace Mann once said in a speech 
to the boys of a large reformatory: 
"If just one boy is reformed his refor- 
mation will well be worth every cent 
this institution cost.' You do not 
mean the reformation of just one boy 
would pay for the monty here invest- 
ed," said one who had listened to his 
speech "Yes, said Mr. Mann, "especi- 
ally if he were my boy." 

This putting of self in the place of 
another is the only just way of esti- 
mating duty. Whittier, the poet, says: 
"Heaven's gate is shut to him who 

comes alone ; 
Save thou a soul and it shall save 
thine own." 

Is not the need of the heathen wo- 
man pathetic and appealing enough to 
us to call forth our best efforts? Can 
we not give them at least one full 
hour of each month? Dear sisters, let 
us launch out, this is what God wants 
us to do. Why does not God relieve 
the Chinese woman of her ignorance 
and suffering? Why does He not res- 
cue the child widow? He is calling for 
you and me to let Him work through 
us. 



A WIDER HORIZON 

What is your life? What do you con- 
ceive the end of life to be? To many, 
especially to young people, life stretch- 
es out ahead as one long pleasure ex- 
cursion — to be well fed, well clothed, 
happily occupied, to keep warm in win- 
ter and cool n summer. Thousands of 
human beings created in the image of 
God are born, grown into maturity, and 
die without ever rising to a higher con- 
cenception of life than this. This is 
the useless life, the wasted life; life 
that leaves no mark or impress upon 
God's great scheme of things; the pla- 
cidly selfish life; the fig tree leafy 'but 
bearing no fruit— the class which our 
Lord himself strove to stir by the 
heart-searching question, "Is not your 
life more than meat?" 

Oliver Wendell Holmes, the New 
England sage, holds that every life 
is built around self as a center, and 
that those we call selfish are the 
lives of narrow circumference, so that 
an arc taken anywhere shows the curve 
around self. But there lived long be- 
fore the sage of New England a sage 
of Tarsus who exclaimed: "For me to 
live is Christ." He placed Christ 
at the center of the circle of 
bis life; and every tho.ight and imag- 
ination and energy and power and 
choice of his being revolved about 
tin? holy central magiet. Let ur 
pause to ask ourselves the most vit.il 
of all questions, searcjiiirj our own 
hearts with the clear light of the Holy 
Spirit, "What is the center of my life? 
Is it self or is it Christ who sits in 
the throne room of my heart, issuing 



orders to all my members and facul- 
ties? What are my familiar guides 
directing my choice? Do I say of 
every action, Will this please and glo- 
rify Christ? or do I secretly turn 
aside to inquire, Will this be pleasant 
and comfortable for me?" Just here 
is the chief distinction between the 
ordinary and the extraordinary life. 
No life, however lowly and humble 
its setting, need be ordinary. God 
lets us decide for ourselves. The 
minute we make the great exchange, 
when we dethrone self in our own 
hearts and crown Him king, the life 
is no longer petty. It has become 
divinely irradiated. The new name 
is written upon our foreheads. Shall 
we ever rest satisfied until we have 
assured ourselves upon this point? Is 
there one willing to settle down and 
remain in the narrow circumference 
around the self sircle? 

Nor, if we find that Christ is the 
center of our lives, does that settle 
the whole problem for us. What is 
bility of your vision. But you can re- 
attainment of the life ''for which we 
are apprehended" to choose the true 
center, but next in importance are 
the questions, "What is the horizon of 
my life? How wide is the circle?" 
As you sit reading this article your 
physical sight is circumscribed by the 
walls of the room, and, so far as your 
present experience extends, you have 
no concept of the far-reacing possi- 
member one day when you stood on a 
great mountain peak, and these same 
tyes swept over vast expanses of cky 
and earth to the utmost limit of their 
capacity, and your vision was satisfied. 

So with the spiritual vision. Some 
gentle Christian women dwell so con- 
tinually on the dear home duties that 
they do not know that their spirits are 
capable of stretching out into wider 
circles of usefulness. Home is th/ 
center of the narrow circles of their 
lives. Other Christian women have 
made their central interest in the wel- 
fare of their cliurch or their commun- 
ity. Lives rich in Christian beauty are 
these. But have they yet attained 
unto the full capacity of the spiritual 
vision. If we have purposed that 
Christ shall be the center of our lives, 
shall we not now take the next step 
and decide that the horizon of his 
life shall also be the horizon of our 
lives, and that we will remain 
content with nothing short of that? 
The great circle of His life, we remem- 
ber, includes the whole world unto 
the last man. It includes the poor 
beggar at the gate, the blind, the halt, 
the sick, the sorrowful, the fallen wo- 
man at the well, the demoniac, the 
possessed of devils, the nobleman's 
son, the daughter of the Syrophenician 
woman, the Greeks, the Gtntiles, the 
uttermost parts of the earth. May 
we climb higher and higher in our 
spiritual experiences, in our consecra- 
tion, until our horizon too stretches 
beyond home, out beyond our own 
church, our own community, our own 
dear land, 'but including all of these, 
until it swings out and embraces in 
its love and service the last sinful, 
suffering woman and child in Cuba, 
Mexico, Brazil, Korea, Japan and Chi- 
na, out into the uttermost parts of the 
world. — Missionary Voice. 



ITEMS FROM MISSIONARY 
BULLETIN 

February the 25th, don't forget to 
have a Home Mission Day of Prayer. 
This meeting should be interdenomina- 
tional, when all the missionary soci- 
eties in a town or commuity may come 
together to pray for the spread of the 
Christian religion in America. Send 
to Mrs. B. W. Lipscombe, 810 Broad- 
way, Nashville, Tenn., and get the pro- 
grams for this occasion. 

* * * * z z z 

It is cause for great rejoicing that 
Nashville, the first city in Southern 
Methodism to establish a Wesley 
House, is at last properly housed. 
In December the new Wesley House 
there was formally opened. The 
building is worth $17,000 and is ideally 
arranged for work. It will be inter- 
esting to the friends of Miss Bessie 



Allen to know that she is head resi- 
dent, and is ably assisted by Miss 
Annie Rector and Miss Sue Herrick. 

* * * * z z z 

Woman has been pushed out Into 
the world as a bread winner by this 
modern industrial age. Fifty-nine per 
cent, of the women between sixteen 
and twenty years of age in the United 
States are engaged in some gainful 
pursuit. There are 239,077 stenogra- 
phers, 327,635 teachers and professors, 
481,159 in various trades, 770,055 en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, 7,300 
physicians and surgeons, ,7,395 preach- 
ers, 2,193 journalists, 1,037 architects, 
designers and draftsmen; 1,010 law- 
yers, 429,497 women in various pro- 
fessions and domestic work. 

» * * * 

The Student Volunteer Convention, 
held at Kansas City, Dec. 31-Jan. 4, 
was a most wonderful meeting — won- 
derful in size, scope, aim and influ- 
ence, most wonderful in the spirit of 
prayer that pervaded the atmosphere 
of the great gathering. The person- 
nel of the body; students, professors 
and representatives of colleges and 
schools, missionaries, representatives 
and secretaries of mission boards, edi- 
tors and correspondents of religious 
press, special delegates, guests and 
laymen. 

In one section sat one hundred and 
fifty Chinese; there were also groups 
of Koreans and Japanese, Arabs and 
Abyssinnians, Turks and Siamese seen 
here and there in the audience. Our 
Scarritt Bible and Training School 
had present eighty-four of their own 
number. The missionary force of the 
Council was represented by Miss Wa- 
ters, of China; Misses Case and Fox, 
of Mexico; and Miss Richmond, of 
Brazil. 

The Student Volunteer Movement 
began twenty-six years ago with "The 
Evangelization of the World in This 
Generation" as its watchword. The 
first emphasis was placed on the words 
'of the world.' When the scope of the 
missionary movement was broadened 
to include all the countries of the 
globe, later the emphasis was trans- 
ferred to the words, "in this genera- 
tion." Now the great need is to place 
a new stress upon the idea of "evan- 
gelization." — Robert E. Speer. 



GOOD ADVICE 

A Chicago father, sending his boy 
out into the world, gave him the fol- 
lowing as a "chart of life:" 

Do as you say — you will need no 

excuses. 

You do not need clean cuffs every 
day, but you need a clean conscience 
all the time. 

Shine the heels as well as the toes 
of your shoes. 

Don't watch the clock — it will keep 
on going — you do the same. 

Don't borrow money — unless you 
positively have the wherewithal to 
pay; then you don't need it. 

Don't lend money to your friends- 
you will lose both. 

Tell the truth — lies are hard to re- 
member. 

He might have added: 

Have a friend, the diviner the bet- 
ter. — Selected. 



THE ART OF BURDEN BEARING 

They only can bear others' burdens 
who quietly and firmly bear their own. 
The principle of service involves the 
possession of strength. To stoop in 
pity one must first stand erect. Each 
one who bears his own burden has 
added to him the further blessing 
that he may bear others' burdens, too. 
— F. G. Peabo&y. 



Claude Robeson 

ORGAN RECITALS 
New Organs Opened 

Teacher of Organ, Greensboro College 
for Women; Organist and Choirmaster 
West Market St. M. E. Church, Organist 
and Director Temple Emanuel. Address 

Greensboro College, Greensboro, N. C. 



January 29, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Epworth League Department 

Conducted by Miss A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. C, 



A BEACON PACE 

Today a passing throng with anxious 
pace 

Brought me a glimpse of one sweet, 

tender face 
Transfigured by the tenderness and 

grace 

Of seasoned sorrow and a hard lost 
race. 

It shamed me that I looked so sullen, 
sad, 

When I, full richly blessed and amply 
clad 

Should live in smiles and making 

others glad, 
And keep within whatever spite I had. 

This face, whose smile was born of 

grief lived through, 
Both lifted up my own, yet warned 

me, too, 

For as the smiling beacon, child of 

barren rocks, 
And reared on reefs that hide their 

rending shocks, 

Would not ibe t/here dispensing its 

warm light 
Were there not dangers lodged in 

rocky night; 
Just so this passing, patient face 
Could ne'er have touched me at my 

hurried pace 
But for the courage of its tender grace 
That came with sorrow and a hard 

lost race. — Madeline Sweeney Mil- 
ler. 



SILENT, YET SPEAKING 

Rev. J. M. Evans 

A small girl desired to unite with the 
church. On account of her extreme 
youth there was decided opposition. 
She became insistent, and declared her 
intention to unite that day. 

A friend whom she loved and who 
exercised great influence over her was 
appealed to to dissuade her if possible. 
The utmost was done to accomplish 
this. But one reason was given — "You 
are too young." 

When the last argument was made 
she said with childlike simplicity, "I 
am not too young to die." 

All opposition was withdrawn and 
she was received. A short time elaps- 
ed and the great Shepherd sent a band 
of angels to remove his lamb from the 
sterile soil of earth to the richer pas- 
ture lands above. Her dust awaits the 
resurrection in one of the most beau- 
tiful cemeteries in the "Blue Grass Re- 
gion" of Kentucky. 

On the cold marble marking her rest- 
ing place are chiseled these words: 
"I am not too young to die." 

How impressive, eloquent and true. 
What a lesson! May the multi f udes 
I of children who gaze upon the silent 
| words on the monument or read them 
- do as she did, and be prepared to 
"meet her in heaven. For, like Abel, 
she "being dead, yet speaketh." — Chris- 
tian Observer. 



UNREALIZED IDEALS 

Who has not fallen discouraged be- 
fore the ideals which he has set up 
for himself to attain unto? He is a 
weak and ambitionless man that has 
not had an experience of this kind. 
The young person who does not place 
before himself certain lofty ideals, 
with the iron purpose of making all 
possible efforts to attain their high- 
ness, is not likely to achieve any mark- 
ed success in life. He is sure to be 
satisfied with himself and whatever 
he does, whereas he ought to often feel 
so dissatisfied with both himself and 
with the result of his efforts that he 
will cry out in desp ir. One of the 
greatest of personal disciplines is that 
of one's doing his utmost to reach 
the top of a high ideal, and yet fail to 
realize its accomplishment. The fail- 
ure may make one feel indescribably 
weak, so that momentarily he resolves 
that he will not ma.Ke another such 
attempt. But this inaction will soon 
pass away and the fires of a noble am- 
bition burn again, leading one onward 
in the pursuit which he had purposed. 
They who succeed largely in any chos- 
en calling are the ones who will not let 
any temporary defeat of high purpose 
keep them back from still greater 
efforts to realize their golden ideal. 
Those very efforts bring a degree and 
quality of strength which could not be 
had in any other way. The apostle 
Paul was an intellectual and spiritual 
giant, but he did not become such by 
the sheer grace of God independently 
of his own mightiest efforts to reach 
a capital ideal. He was never quite 
satisfied with the attainments which 
he had already made, whether intel- 
lectual or purely spiritual. Did he re- 
alize- the attainment of any of his best 
ideals? I am sure that he did not. 
There were majestic heights which he 
failed to reach, but he pushed on un- 
daunted by failure and unslacked in 
his purpose to glorify God in the high- 
est. — C. H. Wetherbee, in Texas Advo- 
cate. 



THE VIOLET, THE EPWORTH 
LEAGUE FLOWER 

The five petals have their signifi- 
cance. The first petal signifies spir- 
ituality; the second petal, resourceful- 
ness; the third petal, growth; the 
fourth petal, perseverance; the fifth 
petal helpfulness to others — Sel. 



WHAT CHRISTIANITY HAS DONE 

Some gentlemen tell us very com- 
placetly that they have no need of re- 
ligion; they can get along well enough 
without it. Let me tell you, my 
friends, the worst kind of religion is 
no religion at all. And these men who 
live in ease and luxury, indulging 
themselves in the amusement of going 
without religion, may be thankful that 
they live in lands where the gospel 
they neglected has tamed the beastli- 
ness and ferocity of the men who, but 
for Christianity, might long ago have 
eaten their bodies like the South Sea 
Islanders, or cut off their heads like the 
monsters of the French Revolution. 

When the microscopic search, of 
skepticism, which has hunted the heav- 
ens and sounded the seas to disprove 
the existence of a creator, has turned 
its attention to human society, and has 
found a place on this planet ten miles 
square where a decent man can live in 
decency, comfort and security, support- 
ing and educating his children unspoil- 
ed and unpolluted; a place where age 
is reverenced, infancy respected, wo- 
manhood honored, and human life held 
in due regard — when the skeptic can 
find such a place on this globe where 
the gospel of Christ has not gone and 
cleared the way, and laid the founda- 
tions and made decency and security 
possible, it will then be in order for the 
skeptical literati to move thither, and 
there ventilate their views. 

But so long as these men are depen- 
dent upon religion which they discard 
for every privilege they enjoy, they 
may well hesitate a little before they 
sep# to rob the Christian, of his hope 
and humanity of its faith in that Savior 
who alone has given to man that hope 
of eternal life which makes life tol- 
erable and society possible, and robs 
death of its terrors and the grave of 
its gloom. — James Russel Lowell. 



Some one has analyzed the fruit of 
the Spirit and found it to be the dif- 
ferent forms of love. "Love stands 
first by itself; then there is joy — love 
excelling; peace — love in repose; long- 
suffering — love untiring; gentleness — 
love in society; goodness — love in ac- 
tion; faith — love on the battlefield; 
meekness — love at school; temperance 
— love in training." — Selected. 



Some people's cast-off happiness, like 
their cast-off clothes, would make some 
other people very happy. — Warner. 



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Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 29, 1914 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by Walter Thompson, SopeiiatemdeBt 



The financial repoirt is small this 
week. The support given the home in 
recent months is fine. We started 
the new Conference year with the sup- 
port fund in good condtion, but it 
takes a little replenishing to keep it 
so. Last year when Dr. Boyer took 
charge it was necessary to borrow a 
considerable sum to begin with — the 
maintenance treasury being empty. At 
Conference we were able to pay this 
back and have a goodly amounc left 
to start the new year. I trust we 
shall not have to borrow to meet tem- 
porary needs and we shall not do so 
if it can be avoided. 

1. If there are those in arrears on 
special support will they not send 
what is behind as early as possible? 

2. Will not our preachers in charge 
send us a part of the ten per cent, 
in quarterly payments? 



The health of the children continues 
good. We have some colds and coughs, 
but nothing serious, and all are about 
well now. 



The weather has been fine for farm 
work and we are getting quite a good 
deal done in preparation for spring. 



RECEIVED ON TEN PER CENT., 
GENERAL AND SPECIAL SUP- 
PORT, WEEK ENDING JAN. 

24, 1914 

Rev. E. Myers, Mooresville circuit, 
Thanksgiving offering, Wm's. cnapel, 
$1.46; Triplett, $1.49; McKendree's, 
$1.25. Centenary, $1.84— total, $7.59; 
Rev. E. Myers, Mooresville, ct., general 
support, $20.00; Mrs. R. J. Foster, 
special support, Hickory W. M. S., 
$5.00; R. H. Page, Cool Spring Union 
Baraoa Class, $3.00; cash, for phone 
use, 65c; total $34.69. 



RECEIVED ON BUILDING FUND— 
J. H. WEST, AGENT 

Paid on Subscription 

Candler: Max Miller, $5.00; R. J 
Gaston, $10.00. Lawndale: T. G. Phil- 
beck, $12.50. Concord: Miss Bessie 
Utley, $2.50. Total, $30.00. 

Paid on Note 

F. S. Thomas, Hendersonville, $1.00 
Loose collection, Murphy church, 
$14.05. Grand total, $45.05. 



temper and manners as you prefer to 
do with your clothes — wear them right 
side out. Do not be so foolish any 
more, little man, as to persist in turn- 
ing things wrong side out." — Olive 
Plants. 



THE WRONG SIDE OUT 

Jack was cross. Nothing pleased 
him. His mother gave him the choic 
est morsels for his breakfast and the 
nicest toys, but he did nothing but 
fret and complain. 

At last his mother said: "Jack, I 
want you now to go right up to your 
room and put |on all your clothes 
wrong side out." 

Jack stared. He thought that his 
mother must be out of her wits. 

"I mean it, Jack," she repeated. 

Jack had to mind. He had to turn 
his stockings wrong side out and put 
on his coat and his pants and his 
collar wrong side out. 

When his mother came up to him, 
there he stood — a forlorn and funny 
looking boy, all linings and seams 
and ravelings — before the glass, won- 
dering what his mother meant; but he 
was not quite clear in his conscience. 

Then his mother, turning him 
around, lid: "This is what you have 
been doing all day, making the worst 
of everything. You have been turn- 
ing everything wrong side out. Do 
you really like your things this way 
so much, Jack?" 

"No, mamma," answered Jack shame- 
facedly. "Can't I turn them right?" 

"Yes, you may if you will try to 
speak what is pleasant and do what 
is pleasnt. You must do with your 



NAMING THE SHIP 

Doris and Robert could hardly wait 
for the story that grandfather had 
promised them. 

"A long time ago, when I was a 
little boy," began Grandfather Alden, 
"there used to be shipyards, where ves- 
sels were built, very near my father's 
house. And one year there was a 
ship built there and named 'Robin.' 
Now you little people can't guess why 
she was named after a bird." 

Doris, who was not quite five, owned 
at once that she could not guess, but 
Robert was two years older and was 
full of guesses. 

"He named her 'Robin' so she would 
fly through the water," he ventured. 

"That would have been a very good 
reason, but it isn't the right one," 
responded grandfather smilingly. "I 
will tell you the story. While the 
ship was being built a bird began to 
build her nest well up toward the 
bow. The men worked round her nest, 
hammered and planked, but she did 
not mind. When the children came 
down into the shipyard, the carpen- 
ters would tell them about the nest, 
and I remember being lifted up to see 
the four little eggs in it. Then there 
came a day when the eggs hatched, and 
there were four young robins, and in 
a few weeks away flew the mother 
with her little family. That very week 
anoter bird built a nest over on the 
starboard side and reared four more 
young ones. The owner of the ship 
was so interested that he di not finish 
the planking till the last one was 
hatched out. Then when the last 
small bird came, the vessel was fin- 
ished and was named the 'Robin,." 

"What became of the ship?" ques- 
tioned Robert. 

"She sailed off across the seas," re- 
plied grandfather, "and I have heard 
was always a fortunate vessel, as she 
ought to have been, because she was 
built by a good man who respected 
the rights even of a family of birds." 

"How did the mother robin know 
about the ship?" asked Doris. 

"O, I suspect a little bird told her," 
replied grandfather laughingly. — The 
Youth's Companion. 



A LAZY FELLOW 

When cold weather approaches near- 
ly all the little forest people, and 
some of the big ones, begin to think 
about their winter retreats. As soon 
as grains and nuts are ripe they go 
busily to work laying up their winter 
stores of food. What do you think of 
one of the wood folk who never hides 
so much as a kernel of corn or an 
acorn, and never gives a thought to 
his cold weather snuggery, but just 
leads a happy-go-lucky life all his 
days? Such a one is Mr. Hedgehog — 
the porcupine. He may be ambling 
along through the woods gazing up 
the tree trunks as he passes by to see 
which has the tastiest looking bark, 
when suddenly Jack Frost drops down 
and gives his toes a sharp nip. Even 
this disturbs him little, and he says 
to himself: "Well, after I've swal- 
lowed all the bark I can I'll look 
about a bit for a hollow log, or a rocky 
cave, where I can curl up for the 
winter." 

You see, when your food grows on 
every tree and you can have it ror the 
taking it seems quite unnecessary to 




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J. P. Wyatt & Sons Co.. Ealeigh, Wake Co. 
Gorham & Matthews Hdw.Co.,Rocky Mount, 
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Hardy Hdw.Co., Scotland Neck, Halifax Co. 
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Benj. Brannock, Boone, Watauga Co. 
Miller Supply Co.,Brevard,Transylvania Co. 
Hutchison, Sehorn & Hipp, Charlotte, 

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China Grove Hdw. Co., China Grove, 

Rowan Co. 
Yorke & Wadsworth Co., Concord, 

• • Cabarrus Co. 

Case & Freeman, Dana, Henderson Co. - 
W.H.Chester,Davidson,R4,MecklenburgCo. 
Pollard Bros., Durham, Durham Co. 
Hub Hdw. Co., Farmville, Pitt Co. / 
FayetteviUe Sup.Co., Fayetteville, 1 

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Standard Hwd. Co., Gastonia, Gaston Co. 
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J. A. Hornaday, Liberty, Randolph Co. 

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lay up any. Mr. Hedgehog never goes 
unarmed, and his weapons are the 
dread of all the other wood folk. Even 
the mighty grizzly has been known 



to fall victim to the lazy porcupine. 
Most of the forest people let the hedge- 
hog severely alone, hut if one of them 
is starving he will brave the porcu- 
pine's quills for the chance of satis- 
fying his hunger. When an enemy 
arrpoaches, "Porky" rolls himself 
into a ball bristling all over with 
sharp, barbed quills. The hunter soon 
has his nose, lips, and paws filled with 
the piercing weapons, which work 
deeper and deeper into his flesh the 
harder he tries to brush them away. 
Each quill has backward - pointing 
barbs by which it works inward till 
sometimes the victim dies from the 
effect. — Margaret W. Leighton. 



MEN WHO MAKE THE WORLD 

Men who make the world of today 
are making the Youth's Companion 
what it is today. It is very much 
more than The Iompanion you may 
remember; no higher in purpose, but 
more lavish in material — larger and 
improved with special Family Pages, 
Boys' Pages, Girls' Pages, and a con- 



stant supply of serials and Ihorter 
stories. 

The editorial page of information, 
comment, science and events will keep 
any man well informed, wblie the 
Family Page helps one home improve- 
ments and ideas, and both boys and 
girls have special pages for them- 
selves. 

You do the family a good turn when 
The Youth's Companion "as it is to- 
day" is sent to the home. Fifty-two 
issues a year — not twelve. More read- 
ing than is found in any monthly 
magazine at any price. 

You may not know The Companion 
as it is today. Let us send you three 
current issues free, that you may thor- 
oughly test the paper's quality. 
THE YOUTH'S COMPANION 
144 Berkeley St., Boston Mass. 



"Why don't you ever go to Europe, 
Mr. Banks?" 

"Because, young man, I am one of 
the people who can afford to stay at 
home." — Selected. 



January 29, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 




At Tuckertown, N. C, January 18, 
1914, Mr. Luther D. Hatley and Miss 
Mary Morris, both of Montgomery 
county, Rev. C. C. Williams officiating. 

* * * * 

At the Greensboro circuit parson- 
age, January 14, 1914, Miss LenaZink 
and Mr. W. T. Purgason, Rev. F. L». 
Townsend officiating. 

At Hickory, on January 15, Mr. 
Harry Riddle to Miss Helen Davis, 
daughter of Mr. I. I. Davis, of Mor- 
ganton. 

* * * * 

At the Methodist church in Moores- 
ville, January 20th, Miss Lottie Kerr, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Kerr, 
to Mr. Lake Templeton, Rev. C. S. 
Kirkpatrick officiating. 

* * * * 

At the residence of the bride's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Win. Cline, Mont- 
gomery county, N. C, on Sunday, Jan. 
25, Miss Laura May Cline to Mr. John 
Morris, Rev. C C. Williams officiating. 



BOWIE — Angeline Bowie was born 
in Iredell county, Norh Carolina, Jan. 
22nd, 1850 and was taken to her re- 
ward Jan. 2nd 1914, at 7:30 A. M., 
aged 63 years, 11 months and 21 days. 
She was married to Franklin Alexan- 
der Bowie about 1877, whom she sur- 
vived by more than three years. 

The issue of this union was ten 
children — eight sons and two daugh- 
ters, all of whom survive her. With 
these there are five grandchildren liv- 
ing, with some dead. 

In 1869 she professed faith in Christ 
and about December 15th, of the same 
year she joined the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, South, an Zion church on 
Mulberry and Walnut Streets, States- 
ville, and what is now known as 
Broad Street church. This was under 
the ministry of Rev. L. F. Way, who 
was then pastor of this church. For 
a number of years she has been a 
member of Race Street church. 

J. J. Eads. 



RICHARDSON— Harold Richardson 
was born September 1, 1909, and 
died January 15, 1914, aged 4 years, 
4 months and 14 days. He had not 
been a strong child for some months, 
but the immediate cause of his death 
was pneumonia. He was an unusual- 
ly quiet, and obedient child, and loved 
to go with his father to Sunday school, 
but he has been transplanted to the 
land where Sunday schools ne'er break 
up and where he will forever behold 
the face of Christ who loved little 
children on earth, and has gone to 
prepare a place for them where there 
will be no sickness, pain or death. 

His funeral was conducted at Mt. 
Olivet church on Saturday following 
his death by the writer, and the little 
grave was covered with flowers. 

May God comfort hose who are so 
sorely bereaved. R. L. Melton. 



BROWN — Mary Elizabeth Pitchford 
Brown was born in Guilford county, 
North Carolina, on January 1st, 1860; 
and was taken January 17th, 1914 at 
5:30 P. M. 

She was married to John B. Brown 
on January 1st, 1882. Of this union 
there were born six children — three 
sons and three daughters, all of whom 
'are living. 

At her marriage she became a step- 
mother of three sons ana two daugh- 
ters. In this relation she was faith- 
ful. She ministered to these with 
| love and affection. In turn these 
proved affectionate and obedient unto 
her. 




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Many years ago she made public 
profession of faith in Jesus Christ, 
and joined the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. In the communion of 
this church she remained until she 
was called to her reward. 

Practically there has been four 
deaths in this family within sixteen 
months, entailing much suffering, 
much watching and much anxiety, to 
say nothing of the material loss. Oh! 
how helpless and how hopeless would 
we be without the comforting prom- 
ises of God. May He comfort this 
greatly bereaved family. 

J. J. Eads. 



SARAH ELLEN SHAW 

This good woman passed away 
Thursday, January 8th, 1914, from 
her home in South Greensboro, where 
she and her beloved husband were liv- 
ing when the end came. 

Sister Shaw was born December 21, 
1842, and was the daughter of Rev. 
Emsley Stafford, a local Methodist 
preacher of Montgomery county, N. 
C. She was born and brought up in 
the midst of warm religious influences 
and very early in life professed faith 
in Christ and united with the Meth- 
odist church at Eleazar in Randolph 
county. These were the days of camp 
meetings, and when shouts of praise 
went up from revival altars. This 
kind of religion she obtained and this 
sort of faith she lived. 

She was married to Henry Shaw, 
and to their union were born two 
noble sons. Her life was given to her 
home, her husband, her sons. She 
was a gentle, patient wife, a tender, 
affectionate mother. She was faithful 
to her loved ones and to her Master 
until He called her to her home on 
high. May her husband be comforted 
with the hope of meeting her again. 

We laid her body to rest in the 



quiet graveyard near Zion church, 
south of the city. 

"Why should we shrink at pain and 
woe? 

Or feel at death dismay? 
We've Canaan's goodly land in view, 
And realms of endless day." 

F. L. Townsend. 



ALLEN — Died at the Allen home 
near Canton, N. C, on the 20th, of 
November, 1913, Miss Kittie Allen, 
one of God's elect ladies. She lived 
in our home as a member of our fam- 
ily for some time during the year 
1900, and we speak from personal know- 
ledge when we say she was one of 
the purest spirits we have ever met. 
She was modest and retiring in her 
nature, and a splendid specimen of 
Christian womanhood. She was de- 
voted to her aged parents during their 
lifetime. She was an affectionate sis- 
ter, a steadfast friend. She loved the 
church, and lived a consistent Chris- 
tian life. 

She came of good family lineage, 
and was a worthy child of a worthy 
parentage. She leaves to her loved 
ones the precious heritage of a spot- 
less character and an untarnished 
name. 

She was gentle, yet firm for the 
right, refined, simple, childlike, and 
with a beautiful spirit of unselfish- 
ness, ready to give herself in service 
for others. 

But this charming life of unselfish 
service here on earth is finished and 
she has passed over to join her saint- 
ed parents and loved ones in the beau- 
tiful city of God. 

Mr. and Mrs. F- L. Townsend. 



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Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 29, 19V. 



The Sunday School j 
Lesson i 



FIRST QUARTER— LESSON V— FEB. 

1, 1914 



The Unfriendly Neighbor. Luke 11. 1-13 



Golden Text — Ask, and it shall be 
given you; seek and ye shall find; 
knock, and it shall bt opened unto you. 
Luke 11:9. 

The Prayer of Jesus 

In a beautiful passage in one of his 
writings Saint Justin the Martyr de- 
scribes the effect of the words of 
Christ: "Moreover, I would wish that 
all, making a resolution similar to my 
own, would not keep themselves away 
from the words of the Saviour. For 
they possess a terrible power in them- 
selves, and are sufficient to inspire 
those who turn aside from the path of 
rectitude with awe; while the sweet- 
est rest is afforded those who make a 
diligent practice of them." Those who 
heard the words of Jesus with alert 
minds and open hearts have all been 
ready to bear the same testimony. And 
from the pages of books His words 
have gone leaping into the life of the 
world with undiminished power. Not 
only the direct teachings of the Mas- 
ter, but also His prayers, have this 
quality of singular and commanding vi- 
tality. The men who heard Jesus pray 
came to have a new definition of re- 
ligion. 

Our study today begins with a prayer 
whose words are not recorded. All 
that we know about it is its effect. Je- 
sus was accustomed to pray in the 
presence of His disciples, and these 
family prayers were an important part 
of His ministry. You may overhear a 
man saying prayers without knowing 
much about him, but if you hear a man 
when he really prays, you have come 
into the presence of his very soul. Mat- 
thew Arnold in a fine line described a 
man whose "soul looked out of his 
eyes." It may be said of many a saint 
that his soul looks out through his 
prayers. 

When Jesus prayed the curtains 
were withdrawn and the ligbt of His 
soul flashed forth. Such communion 
with the Father, such crystal clear 
sincerity of purpose, such deep under- 
standing of men expressed in simplt, 
living words, such passionate pur- 
pose to do the Father's will and such 
golden vision of the glory of His God 
and His kingdom glowed in the 
words of Jesus that it was like the 
sudden shining forth of the sun from 
behind a cloud. The qualities which 
stirred and mastered men were partic- 
ularly evident in this unrecorded pray- 
er of Jesus, and at its close the dis- 
ciples were moved with one desire. 
"Lord," they said, "teach us to 
pray." 

They had heard many voices lifted 
in prayer, they bad rtpeated prayers 
themselves, and in some stressful and 
earnest places in their lives they had 
truly prayed, but prayer like that of 
Jesus was beyond anything they had 
ever known or experienced. It was like 
the opening of many doors, and the 
vistas seen beyond were wonderfully 
beautiful and infinitely alluring. The 
disciples wanted to go through those 
doors. They felt that they did not 
know how to pray at all; so they asked 
Jesus to teach them. 

The Prayer for the Disciples' Use 

An American poet has written: 

"Though smooth be the heartless pray- 
er, no ear in heaven will mind it: 

And the finest phrase falls dead if 
there is no feeling behind it. 

"So it is not the speech which tells, but 
the impulse which goes with the 
saying. 

And it is not the words of the prayer, 
but the yearning back of the pray- 
ing." 

Because prayer at its highest is a 
matter of a great heart, a mighty pas- 




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acre, giving a clear profit of $500. 00 per acre. One of the large orchards we are 
interested in produced on a few select acres as high as 1000 bushels per acre, but 
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The apple is a long lived tree and will bear profitable crops for a genera- 
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reensboro Nurseries 

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sion and the tide of a full life turning 
home to God, the desirt to be taught 
to pray involves vastly more than is 
usually realized. Experience, struggle, 
the pang of defeat, the joy of victory, 
the discipline of suffering, the habit of 
a constant outreach after the strength 
of God — these must come before a man 
really is able to pray. 

"While all this is true, Jesus did not 
want to discourage His disciples and 
He knew that a simple form of peti- 
tions, asking for the right things, could 
be of the greatest practical value to 
them, as through experience and con- 
flict and trust they came to the place 
where great prayer was actually pos- 
sible. They must do more than say 
this prayer if it benefited them. They 
must live it. When they put it into 
command of their lives they would 
come to know its meaning. 

The prayer itself touched the things 
of God and the things of men. It in- 
cluded the loftiest worship and a sense 
of the most practical needs. The cry 
of adoration and the cry for bread 
were found together in one prayer. It 
was a social prayer, and with the 
whole sweep of the kingdom of God 
included in its range. It was an in- 
dividual prayer, with the desire for 
forgiveness and personal moral safety 
expressed in it. It had the profound- 
est spirit of rotherhood and mercy, 
for it taught men how to forgive as 
well as to ask for forgiveness. When 
men began to spell out its petitions 
with the passion of a deep personal 
desire a new day had dawned in their 
lives. 

Encouragement by Means of a Contrast 

If a man can appreciate the amazing 
epigrams and delightful paradoxes in 
such a volume as Gilbtrt Chesterton's 
Orthodoxy he finds it easier to under- 
stand s|ome things hi the Gospels. The 
essentially commonplace mind has al- 
ways gotten into trouble with certain 
sayings of Jesus, and the mechanically 
lteral mind has made confusion enough 
in interpreting the Gospels. It must 
always be remembered that Jesus was 



an Oriental, delighting in vivid hyper- 
bole in striking epigram and in power- 
ful paradox. Again and again He fair- 
ly shocked people into thinking by the 
sheer verbal audacity of the things 
which He said. 

After giving His disciples a form of 
prayer He wanted to make the whole 
matter strongly human and practically 
powerful to His hearers. There is no 
subject on wbich men are more likely 
to become piously sluggish than the 
subject of prayer. Jesus decided to 
startle His disciples into a sudden con- 
sciousness of how real and human and 
graspable it all was by a very unusual 
illustration. He told the story of a 
selfish man of more or less morose 
disposition. When a friend came for 
a favor in the middle of the night he 
gruffly growled out his refusal The 
friend simply kept on asking, and at 
last the sullen man, worn out by the 
persistence of the midnight caller, 
gave him what he wanted. 

The disciples listened wide-eyed and 
astonished to this story. There was a 
glowing human light in Jesus' eye as 
He suggested that God would do at 
least as much for them as this churl- 
ish man had done for his friend. The 
force of the contrast was irresistible. 
Suddenly against this background of 
irony the disciples caught a new vision 
of the great, good, generous God. And 
Jesus cried out, His eyes flashing and 
His voice vibrant, "I say unto you, 
Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, 
and ye shall find; knock, and it shall 
be opened unto you." In the moment 
of illumination it seemed a's if the very 
windows of heaven were opened. 

Encouragement by Means of a Parallel 

Jesus had by no means complted 
His attempt to make His teaching 
about prayer intimate and telling. He 
had tried the effect of a strange con- 
trast; He now tried the effect of a 
startling parallel. Look into your own 
hearts and you will find something of 
what God is like. This was His sur- 
prising teaching. Some of you are 
fathers. You do not give pebbles to 



your children instead of bread, or littl 
snakes ready to bite instead of fist 
or coiled scorpions instead of eggi 
It is of the very nature of huma 
fatherhood to love to give good gift 
Now God is just like that. Your hea 
enly Father and a human father hav 
this in common. They love to giv 
good things to their children. Do n< 
think of God as less generous tha 
yourselves. 

You have no end of faults and sel 
ish sins coil themselves about yoi 
hearts, but for all that you know ho 
to love and you know how to giv 
Do not make the mistake of thinkir 
that the perfect God, all spotless ar 
holy can be outdistanced by a hums 
parent in the matter of loving and tl 
matter of giving. Indeed, he not on 
delights to give, but He wants to gn 
His very best, and even to share H 
own divine life through the gift of tl 
| Holy Spirit to those who care enouj 
| to ask for that high gift. God is infi 
itely more than human fatherhood 
its best, but in our emphasizing the 
finitely more we must not forget th 
it includes as much. All the instinc 
of hearty, loving fatherhood dwell fc 
ever in the life of God. 

By such illustrations as these Jes 
made very vivid and concrete the Fat 
erhood of God. And by such teachii 
he sought to inspire in His discipl 
a boundless trust in the heavenly Fat 
er. — N. Y. Christian Advocate. 



GLADNESS IN EVERYTHING 

A bright, happy soul, rejoicing 
all God's gifts, seeing cause for thai] 
fulness and gladness in everythii 
counting up mercies rather than tria 
looking at the bright side, even 
sickness, bereavement and death 
what a very fountain of goodness a 
love of Christ such an one is! I 
member one who, worn with sickn( 
and sleepless nights, answered to t 
question if the nights did not se< 
interminable: "O no; I lie still a 
count up my blessings!" — H. L. S 
ney Lear. 



January 29, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



N. B. Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as information, and are not 
guaranteed. 

12:25 a. m. No. 32, daily. The South- 
ern's Southeastern .Limited. Pull- 
man drawing-room, compartment, 
and open section sleeping cars 
Jacksonville, Augusta, and Aiken 
to New York. Day coaches. Dining 
car service. 

12:55 a. m. No. 112 daily. Local for 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. Pullman 
sleeping car Winston-Salem to 
Kaleign open at 9:30 p. m. 
1:20 a. m. No. 29, daily. Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room and 
observation, sleeping cars New 
York, and Richmond to Birming- 
ham, and New York to ColumDUS, 
Ga. Daily tourist car Washington 
to San .b'rancisco via Sunset Route. 
Dining car service. 
2:05 a. m. No. 30, daily. Birmingham 
Special. Pullman drawing-room, 
and observation sleeping cars Birm- 
ingham, Columbus, and Asheville 
to New York, and Birmingham to 
Richmond, Va. Tourist car San 
Francisco-Washington. Dining car 
service. 

2:45 a. m. No. 31, daily. The South- 
ern's Southeastern Limited. Pull- 
man drawing-room, open section, 
and compartment sleeping cars New 
York to Jacksonville, Aiken, and 
Augusta, and New York to Ashe- 
ville. Day coaches. Dining car 
service. 

3:45 a. m. 45 daily local for Charlotte, 
connecting for Atlanta and points 
south. 

7:10 a. m. No. 8 daily local for Rich- 
mond. 

7:15 a. m. 1st No. 37 daily. New York 
and New Orleans Limited, Pullman 
drawing-room, state-room, open 
section and observation sleeping 
cars. New York and New Orleans; 
club car Washington to Montgom- 
ery; Pullman parlor car Greensboro 
to Montgomery. Solid Pullman 
lanta. Pullman observation parlor 
cial. Pullman drawing-room, open 
section sleeping cars New York to 
Asheville, Charlotte, Macon and At- 
car Greensboro to Atlanta. Solid 
Pullman train, with dining car ser- 
vice. 

7:15 a. m. 2nd No. 37 daily Atlanta Spe- 
train with dining car service. 

7 :30 a. m. No. 108 daily local Greensboro 
to Goldsboro. 

7:35 a. m. No. 11 daily local to Atlanta. 
Pullman drawing-room, sleeping 
cars Norfolk to Asheville, and Rich- 
mond to Charlotte. 

7:40 a. m. No. 154, daily except Sunday. 
Local to Ramseur. 

8:15 a. m. No. 237, daily for Winston - 
Salem and North Wllkesboro. Hand- 
les Pullman sleeping car Raleigh 
to Winston-Salem. 

8:20 a. m. No. 133 daily local for Mt. 
Airy. 

9:30 a. m. No. 44 daily for Washington 

and points north. 
9:40 a. m. No. 144 daily for Raleigh, 
Selma and Goldsboro; handles At- 
lanta-Raleigh sleeping car. 

12:30 p. m. No. 21 daily local to Ashe- 
ville and Waynesville, connecting at 
Asheville with Carolina Special for 
all points west. Coaches and Pull- 
man chair car. 

12:45 p. m. No. 7 daily local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Seneca and 
Columbia. 

12:55 p. m. No. 130 daily local for San- 
ford, Fayetteville and Wilmington. 
1:00 p. m. No. 14 daily local for Rich- 
mond. Sleeping car Danville to 
Richmond. 

1:35 p. m. No. 36, daily U. S. Fast Mail, 
for Washington, New York and 
points north. Pullman sleeping cars 
Birmingham and New Orleans to 
New York, and Asheville to Rich- 
mond. Pullman chair car Greenville 
to Washington. Dining car ser- 
vice. 

2:30 p. m. No. 151 daily except Sunday 
for Madison. 

2:00 p. m. No. 207 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

3:30 p. m. No. 230 daily except Sunday 
for Ramseur. 

4:20 p. m. No. 22 daily for Raleigh, Sel- 
ma and Goldsboro. Pullman chair 
car Waynesville to Goldsboro. 

5:00 p. m. No. 131 daily for Mount Airy 
connecting at Rural Hall, daily ex- 
cept Sunday with train for North 
Wllkesboro. 

6:40 p. m. No. 13 dally local for Salis- 
bury; handles Pullman sleeping car 
Richmond to Asheville, which car 
may be occupied until 7 a. m. 

6:10 p. m. No. 35 daily U. S. Fast Mall 
through to Atlanta and New Or- 
leans. Pullman sleeping cars New 
York to New Orleans and Birming- 
ham, and Pullman chair car Wash- 
ington to Greenville. Dining car 

SGfVlCG. 

6:30 p. m. No. 132 daily local for San- 
ford. 

6:35 p. m. .No. 236 daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

7:30 p. m. No. 43 daily for Atlanta and 
points south. Pullman sleeping car 
Raleigh to Atlanta. 

10:13 p. m. 1st No. 38 daily Atlanta Spec- 
ial. Pullman drawing-room, open 
section sleeping cars Macon, Atlan- 
ta, Charlotte and Asheville to New 
York. Pullman observation car At- 
lanta to Greensboro. Solid Pullman 
train with dining car service. 

10:20 p. m. No. 233 daily for Wlnstan- 
Salem. 

10:31 p. m. No. 12 daily local to Richmond, 
Handles Pullman sleeping cars 
Asheville to Norfolk and Charlotte 
to Richmond. 

11:13 p. m. 2nd No. 38 daily New York 
and New Orleans Limited. Pullman 
drawing-room, state room, open sec- 
tion and observation sleeping cars 
New Orleans to New York; club 
car Montgemery to Washingten. 
Solid Pullman train with dining 
oar lerytce. 



Our Little Folks 



MUCH WITH LITTLE 

It was at recess that the whisper 
went around that Jane Thorton was go- 
ing to have a party — poor little mother- 
less Jane, who kept house for her fath- 
er and little sister in the tiny, weather- 
beaten house in the edge of town. And 
it created no end of a "stir" among 
the girls; in fact, nothing else was 
talked of during the half hour, usually 
given over to play. There had been 
many parties of various kinds given 
by the girls -of the school — birthday 
parties without number — very nice 
ones they were, too, with "contests" 
like the grown-ups had, and delicious 
refreshments. It had gotten to be a 
matter of pride with the mothers to see 
which child could give the nicest par- 
ty, and each one was eagerly looked 
forward to by the "small fry," as the 
older /brothers liked to call them. 

"I suppose we will have to go, for 
Jane is nice, even if she does live in a 
tumble-down house," said Louise Lan- 
drum, who was the leader of the girls 
in all their good times. "But I'm afraid 
she'll feel very much ashamed, for you 
know she can't have things like the 
rest of us. I'm sure I shouldn't try 
to have anything when I had nothing 
to have it with!" 

After all, it was not Jane's party, but 
her little sister's — fair-haired Lillian 
— whom she had cared for so tenderly 
since her mother's death. She had 
been thinking of it a long time, put- 
ting aside gay bits of paper, scraps 
of silk and ribbon that she found. 
When she was busy with her house- 
work she found herself thinking of 
things to do at this wonderful party, 
and the tasks did not seem nearly so 
long nor hard. She had been greatly 
puzzled as to what she would serve, for 
even if she had ice cream, she had no 
dishes to serve it in. And all at once 
she thought of the well-filled keg of 
molasses down in the cellar an uncle 
from the country had sent them at 
Christmas time. 

Why not have a "candy-pull!' Of 
course, there would be a great deal of 
work to do afterward, but she did not 
mind that, and not a single candy-pull- 
ing had been given in a long time — ■ 
they were so "old-fashioned!" And so, 
when she carefully wrote the invita- 
tions she asked each girl to wear her 
plainest dress and an apron. And all 
the children wondered why they should 
be asked to do this, and declared it 
was because Jane herself would only 
wear a gingham or a calico! 

Jane was a famous candy-maker, 
making the old-fashioned molasses taf- 
fy that her mother had taught her to 
make, and the children, when they 
came first smelt the delicious candy as 
it bubbled on the stove, and they re- 
membered how good it was, and fairly 
danced for glee. They understood why 
it was they had been asked to wear 
their plainest clothes. 

"Oh, Jane! it's a candy pull, isn't 
it?" they asked, as they trooped into 
the kitchen. And Jane nodded happily, 
and little Lillian showed them the row 
of plates ready for the catuly — a placa 
for each child to pull. 

What a merry time followed. No 
"grown-up" contest had proved such 
fun! The children forgot their usual 
"party" manners, and were gay and 
happy as children could be. And after 
the candy was pulled, with many acci- 
dents that caused great laughter, there 
were all sorts of old-fashioned games- 
many quite new to the children. But 
the best thing of all was the wonder 
ful "grab-bag," with its treasures. And 
every one made by Jane. "Penny 
dolls, in long crepe dresses, funny men, 
made of corn-stalks, handkerchief hold 
ers of fancy paper napkins, things for 
dolls of scraps of ribbon and lace. The 
children shouted with delight as they 
drew forth these treasures, one by one. 
And Jane was happy, because they 
had cost her nothing but work in odd 
hours, and that she gladly gave. 



"There have been many parties," 
said Louise Landrum when the time 
came to leave, "but there hasn't been 
one so nice as this." 

And as she walked homt she thought 
of the many things she had to make 
her happy, and how little Jane had. 
and she remembered what her grand- 
mother had often told her: 

"People who make much out of little 
are always happier." 

She had not believed it before and 
yet, when she saw Jane's shining face 
and what happiness she had made 
with only a few cents to spend, she 
saw what her grandmother meant. And 
as soon as she got home she told her 
about this simple party of Jane's for 
her sister, and how well she had man- 
aged on "nothing!" 

"It is a gift, dear child," said grand- 
mother, softly. "This making happi- 
ness within ourselves. No one can be 
truly happy without being content with 
what they have. That lesson Jane has 
learned." 

"And a lot of us are going to learn 
it, too," said Louise, with a smile. — 
Selected. 



ENTERTAINING MRS. VON TOBEL 

Alice Carter and her mother were 
going over to Aunt Jane's. Betty and 
Ted were to stay at home, because the 
grocer was coming, and somebody 
must be there to take the things. Ted 
and Betty sat on the front steps. 

"If Mrs. Von Tobel calls," laughed 
Alice, "you can entertain her, and tell 
her we will be back in a little while." 

"Yes, I will," answered Betty. 

The carter family had lived in the 
neighborhood only a few weeks; but 
everybody had called except Mrs. Von 
Tobel, the lady who lived in the grand 
house across the street Her possible 
visit had been the subject of much 
speculation among the children, Alice 
insisting that of course she would call 
and Ted declaring that she would not. 

"I guess she's coming," whispered 
Betty as the opposite door opened and 
a tall, handsome woman walked down 
to the gateway. 

Betty arose to meet the visitor, and 
politely held out her little band. "How 
do you do?" she said. "I thought you 
would come, and Alice did too, but Ted 
said you wouldn't. Mamma and Alice 
have gone over to Aunt Jane's; but 
Alice said if you came to tell you that 
they'd be back soon, and that I could 
en'tain you. Please walk in." And 
she led the way to the parlor. 

"I am glad that you expected me," 
the lady said. "I should have come 
before if I had not benn ill." 

"Why didn't you bring your little 
girl? Is she as old as I am? I'm six 
and a quarter." 

"Gladys is only three and three-quar- 
ters," laughed Mrs. Von Tobel. 

"What does she eat? Did she have 
oatmeal and milk for breakfast this 
morning? I did." 

"Really, I don't know what she had. 
Her nurse attends to her breakfast. 
Gladys has had a little cold, but I think 
she will be well enough to come to 
see you soon." 

"O, won't that be nice!" cried Betty. 
"Will she come in the automobile?" 

"No, I think she will be able to 
walk," replied the lady very soberly. 

"Does she like to ride in the automo- 
bile?" 

"Very much. Do you enjoy auto rid- 
ing? Then I shall have to take you 
and Gladys for a long, beautiful ride 
some day." 

"O-o-o!" squealed Betty delightedly. 
And then Mrs. Carter and Alice came 
home. 

"Your little daughter has been enter- 
taining me very pleasantly," Mrs. Von 
Tobel said. 

Betty smiles up into her sister's face. 
"I did just as you told me, and she's 
going to take me to ride in the auto- 
mobile!" — Emma C. Dowd. 



If it's Gardner's it's Good 




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and 
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week for disability as long as you 
live. Write me. 

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Aetna Life Insurance Co. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Your Money 
Will Earn 



6f 



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keep off trespassers, as 
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^^Greensboro^N^l^^^^ 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



January 29, 1914 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
HOLT'S CHAPEL 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



MOUNT 



tftCame 



Date. 



79/.... 



Dollars Cents 



MISSIONS AND CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

MOUNT ZION CHURCH 



Name. 
Date .. 



Dolla 



Cents 



$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1.40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities.' 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. [C. 



* »» » 



Quarterly Meetings 



ASH EVI LLE DISTRICT— C. A. Weod, 
Presiding Elder, Weaverville, N. C. 



First Round 

January 

Black Mountain 30 

Swannanoa Ct., Swannanoa 31 

February 

Central, Asheville 1 

Weaverville 1 

Fairview Ct., Tweeds 7-8 

Tryon and Saluda, Tryon 8 

Weaverville Ct.. Salem 14-15 

Mars Hill, Laurel 15 

Leicester, Leicester 21-22 

Walnut, Jewell Hill ,.28 

March 

Spring Creek, Balm Grove 1 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— Plato T. Dur- 
ham, Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 



January 

Prospect, Trinity 31 

February 

Monroe, Central 1 

North Monroe 1 

Ansonville, Ansonville 7-8 

Lilesville, Lilesville 8-9 

Morven, Sandy P 14-15 

Wadesboro, night 16 

Unionville, Grace 21-22 

Polkton, Peachland, night 22-23 

March 

Matthews, Matthews 1-2 

Marshville, Gilboa 7-8 

Mt. Zion, Mt Zion 14-15 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT— G. T. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 

First Round 

February 



Deep River Ct., West Bend 31-1 

Asheboro, a. m 1 

Rai.dleman and N. St. P*ul's 1-2 

Coleridge Ct., Concord 7-8 

Ramseur and F'ville, Ramseur 8-9 

Ruffln Ct., Ruffln 14-15 



MOUNT AIRY DISTRICT— R. M. Hoyle, 
Presiding Elder, Mount Airy, N. C. 



First Round 

January 

Rural Hall Ct., Rural Hall 31 

February 

Pilot Mountain Ct., Pilot Mountain ..1-2 

Jonesville Ct., Jonesville 7-8 

Elkin Station 8-9 

Danbury Ct, Davis' Chapel 14-15 

Spray and Draper, Spray 21-22 

Leaksville Station 23-24 

Dobson Ct., Siloam 28 

March 

Yadkinville, East Bend 1-2 



MORGANTON DISTRICT— J. E. GAY, 
Presiding Elder, Marlon, N. C. 



First Round 

January 

Morganton Ct., Mt., 

Pleasant 31, Feb. 1 

February 

Connelly Springs, Connelly Springs, 7-8 

Micaville, Shoal Creek 13 

Bald Creek. Elk Shoal 14-15 

Burnesville, Burnesville 15-16 

Spruce Pine and Bakensville, Spruce 
Pine 21-22 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— M. 
H. Vestal, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

February 



Elkville Mission, Stanton 1 

Creston, Creston 7-8 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 10 

Elk Park, Elk Park 12 

Avery. Pinola 14-15 



SALISBURY DISTRICT — W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 



First Round 

January 

Concord Ct, Olivet 31 

February 

Concord Ct, Olivet 1 

Concord, Forest Hill, night 1 

Albemarle Circuit, Bethesda 7-8 

Albemarle, Central, night 8 

Kannapolis Station 14-15 

Landls Circuit, Landis 14-15 

Bethel and Loves Chapel, Bethel ..21-22 

Concord, Epworth, night 22 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m 28, Mar. 1 

Concord, Westford, night 28, Mar. 1 



SHELBY ulSTRICT— J. R. Scroggs, 
Presiding Elder, Shelby, N. C. 

First Round 

January 

South Fork, Plateau 81 

February 

Lincoln ton Station 1 

Llncolnton Ct, Pisgah 7-8 

Lowell, Lowell 14 

McAdenville McAdenville, night 14 

Crouse, Antloch 21 

Cherryville, Mary's Chapel 28 



District Stewards will meet at Shelby 
on Wednesday, Dec. 31, 1913, at 2 o'clock 
p. m. 



STATESVILLE D I ST R I ST— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

January 

Alexander Ct., Hlddenite, 

11 a. m 31, Feb. 1 

February 

Stony Point Ct, Stony Ft, night 1-2 

Catawba Ct, Catawba, 11 a. m. . .7-8 
Cool Springs Ct., New Salem, 

11 a. m 14-15 

Troutman Ct, Vanderburg, 11 a. m., 21-22 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night 22-23 
Mooresville Ct, Fairview, 

11 a. m 28, Mar. 1 

March 

Davidson Sta., Davidson, night 1-2 

Marlon Station 7-8 

N. Lenoir Ct, Mt. Zion, 11 a. m. ..7-8 
Lenoir Sta., Lenoir, night 8-9 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
dell, Presiding Elder, R. 2, Asheville, 



N. C. 

January 

Franklin Ct, Salem 28-29 

Macon Ct, Union 30-31 

February 

Franklin Station 1-2 

Hayesville Ct, Bethel 4-6 

Ranger Ct., Ranger 7 

Murphy Station 8-9 

Robbinsville, Robbinsville 11-12 

Murphy Ct., Tomotla 14 

Andrews Station ...15-16 

Crestmont 21-22 

Waynesville Station 24 

Canton Station 25 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer. Pre- 
siding Elder, Winston, N. C. 
First Round 



Januar 

Forsyth Ct, Bethel 31, Feb. 1.. 

February 

Forsyth Ct, Bethel 1 

Cooleemee, night 1-2 

Lewlsville, Sharon 7-8 

Southsid.o night 8-9 

Centenary, 11 a. m 14 

West End, 7:30 p. m. 14 

Farmlngton, Farmington 21-22 

Advance. Advance 22-23 



THE BEAUTY THAT IS NEAR 

Many complain that their life is 
all gray days, that there is little 
beauty or pleasure in it, that it is 
just one hard grind from morning 
until night year in and out. The 
complaint goes up .everywhere, from 
monotonous round from cookstove to 
dishpan; from workers who go from 
home to store or factory and back 
again; even from the butterfly whose 
endless social engagements become a 
weariness alike to flesh and spirit. 

But isn't this complaint a matter 
of viewpoint father than of actual 
fact? 

Two office girls were walking home 
one night after a bad snow storm 
which left the city -streets as only 
city streets can be after a snowstorm. 
One grumbled and growled the whole 
way about the mud and slush. The 
other was looking up to a patch of 
blue sky and a glorious sunset in the 
west. It is a question of choice. One 
can look at mud or one can look at 
stars. If one can remedy the mud 
by seeing it, then see it. But if no 
good can be done, then why not face 
the other way? 

There is beauty all around us to 
brighten our lives, and it does brigh- 
ten life, if we let it work its will with 
our spirit. Alice Freeman Parker, 
that wonderful woman who was col- 
lege president at 26, tells of a little 
child of the slums of Boston to whom 
she had given that famous recipe for 
happiness: "See something beautiful 
every day." The child fervently fol- 
lowed the advice and each day walked 
the streets until she found something 
to her childish eyes beautiful, and 
then returned to her miserable home 
happy because of it. But one day she 
ihad to mind the baby and so could 
not go out. She was mourning over 
missing her gleam of happinetes when 
suddenly a ray of sunshine struck the 
baby's hair. "And there was my 
beauty," she said ecstatically, when 
telling Mrs. Palmer. "It was all gold 
in the sunlight and soft and curly. I 
never knew it was so : beautiful." 

Every one has beauty just as near, 
the sales-person has Tinder her finger 
rich silks, filmy laces, dainty embroid- 
eries, exquisite potteries — things she 
would need to travel the world around 
to see. A modern department store 



is a world in miniature, The jewelry, 
the artwares, the dress goods, each 
have a tale to tell of beauty, of mar- 
velous and intricate making, perhaps 
of the life of the country from which 
they come. An open mind in a store 
can reap a harvest of interest from 
the good alone to say notnmg or the 
entertainment that comes from con- 
tact with the human nature there. 

The same is true of almost any work, 
for labor reaches out through many 
avenues now to all parts of the world, 
avenues through which the mind and 
imagination of the worker may fol- 
low and glean beauty and delight. 

A woman because of her health is 
condemned to spend her life far from 
home and friends and her days are 
days of gloom and despondency in 
consequence. But she is in a land of 
enchantment, of marvelous blue skies 
and blue waters, of beautiful flowers 
and majestic palm trees. This beauty 
would offer some consolation if she 
would but see it. It is all about her 
but she shuts her eyes to it and thinks 
only of that which is beyond her 
reach. 

Robert Louis Stevenson, that prince 
of optimists, says: "The best things 
are nearest: breath in your nostrils. 



light in your eyes, flowers at you 
hand, the path of God just before you 
Then do not grasp at the stars, bu 
do life's plain, common work as i 
comes, certain that daily duties an 
daily bread are the sweetest things o 
life." 

If you will look with seeing visioi 
you will find beauty about you everj 
where. And beauty puts so muc 
pleasure in life it is worth while t 
cultivate the eye that sees. — Barbar 
Boyd. 



BIG SAVING ON PIANOS 

By clubbing your order with nlnetj 
nine other subscribers through th 
North Carolina Christian AdvocateuP 
ano Club, you save about one-third th 
price on a high grade Piano or Playei 
piano. A new Cluib is now forming 
Write for descriptive catalogue an 
testimonials from old Club members 
Address the Managers, Ludden i 
Bates, North Carolina Christian Adv< 
cate Piano Club Dept., Atlanta, Ga. 



"This," said the man of the housi 
as he mournfully surveyed three ca: 
pets and ten rugs hanging on tl 
clothes line, "this is a combinatio 
hard to beat." — Princeton Tiger. 



January 29, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



North Carolina 
Christian Advocate 

Entered the 1 ost Office at GiMBgboro, N. C. , 
mall matter o the second clan. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One year $1.6* 

Six Month* 76 

Te all preachers »f the Oeaeel at $1.«0 

par year. 

Make all remittances to CHRISTIAN 
AX>VOOATB, Greensboro, N. C. 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION (INC.) 

D. B. Coltrane, President Concord 

Rev. J. R. Scroggs, Vlce-Pres., Charlotte 

N. L. Sure, Secretary Greensboro 

W. G. Bradsbaw High Point 

T. C. Hoyle Greensboro 







Our Dead 


- - - V 

i 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, God in His infinite wis- 
dom has seen best to remove from 
our midst out beloved .scholar and 
classmate, Webb Ripple, aged 19 years, 
and whereas he was a most faithful 
and loyal member of our Sunday 
school class and church at ML Olivet, 
therefore be it resolved: 

First, that while it is sad and pain- 
ful to us and we cannot understand 
why a life so filled with all he prom- 
ise of a bright future should be taken 
at the very threshold of young man- 
hood, yet we humbly bow in submis- 
sion. 

Second, that in the death of Webb 
Hippie, we have lost a most valuable 
member, one who was kind and true. 
He was always considerate, courteous 
and unselfish, and while his seat in 
our class is vacant and his voice 
wnich we so much loved to near 
among us is forever stilled in death, 
we shall ever remember and cherish 
his open, manly character. 

Third, that we render to the be- 
reaved family our deepest and most 
heartfelt sympathies in their sad af- 
fliction. 

Fourth, that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the family and copies 
to the North Carolina Christian Ad- 
vocate and Davidson Dispatch with a 
request to publish. 

Mrs. J. L. Zimmerman, 

Teacher. 

Paul F. Evans, 
Stamey L. Craver, 
Fred W. Tesh, 
Grady L. Zimmerman, 

Committee. 



JOYNER — Samantha Adda Dawson, 
youngest daughter of M. H. and W. 
S. Dawson, was born July 28, 1870, 
and died January 15, 1914, aged 43 
years, 5 months and 17 days. She 
was married to A. C. Joyner August 
31, 1890. She was the mother of eight 
children, Pearl, Bertie and May; two 
fancy. She leaves a husband, three 
childrtn, Pearl, Bertie and May; two 
sisters, Mrs. S. J. Holder and D. A. 
Craver; and one brother, the writer; 
with many relatives and friends to 
mourn their loss. In early life she 
professed religion and joined the M. 
E. Church, South, but after her mar- 
riage she joined the Missionary Bap- 
tist church with her husband. She 
was a devoted wife and mother, a 
loving sister, a true friend and neigh- 
bor. For more than a year she was 
a great sufferer, but bore it patiently, 
willingly submitting to the will of 
God and expressing a willingness to 
die and be with Jesus. 

W. L. Dawson. 



Life is made up, not of great sac- 
rifices or duties, but of little things, 
in which smiles and kindnesses and 
small obligations, given habitually, are 
what win and preserve the heart and 
secure comfort. — Sir H. Davy. 



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Address- CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



MISS ALICE NEILSON 

One of the world's greatest sopranos, 
and Mr. E. Bomayne Simmons, the 
famous Piano accompanist, both give 
their highest endorsement of the 

WEAVER 
PIANO 

to a newspaper critic after having 
used it in concert, and for private 
rehearsal. 

Copied from "The Dispatch," York, Pa., March 2, 1912. "Miss 
Neilsen used one of the Colonial style 20 Weaver Pianos in her room 
at the hotel for private rehearsals. She remarked afterwards: 'It is 
a dear little Piano, a lovely instrument. It suited me exactly and I 
mean it.' 

"The Weaver Grand used for the Concert in the Opera House, was not one of the large size Concert 
Grands, but the tone appeared to be larger than the Piano. Mr. E. Eomayne Simmons, the marvelous accom- 
panist, demonstrated the class of the Weaver Piano when he drew from it effects that can only be pro- 
duced by a great Artist with a great Piano. Such extremes of light and shade, of legato and staccato, 
of brilliancy and sympathetic delicacy are seldom found combined in one Piano. Mr. Simmons said, 
'It is a great Piano.' " 

WEAVER ORGAN & PIANO COMPANY, m To f bk?™. eb8 ' 





fr'l ' '" " • » ' " 11 -1 1 - M l I i , , | l.i 

Page Sixteen NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE January 29, 1914 



1 




SI 




Publisher's Appeal for Advocate Campaign 

1914 — 

The lists for each pastoral charge have been sent out and No. 2. To the one who will secure thirty-five new sub- 
are now in the hands of the pastors. If any pastor has failed to scriptions, we will give the same assortment of ware only 
receive lists or if any lists received are incomplete we will without the chest, 
thank them to notify the office at once so correct lists may be XT n _ _ 

sent No - 3 - 0ne Set Rogers Triple Plate Knives and Forks 

' Now is the time to press the battle. These beautiful winter Jj£ fXcrib^' t0 ^ ^ Wh ° ^ ^ * twenty ' five 
days offer great opportunity for pastoral work and there is 

no better way to carry on your Advocate campaign than in No. 4. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons and one 
connection with pastoral visiting. To present the matter of Butter Knife, to the one who will send in fifteen new sub- 
family worship, family reading and the general subject of scriptions. 
home culture makes the pastoral visit a matter of real value KT ■ ■■ 

to the home and will make the pastor feel that he is really do- No - £ .y ne Set Rogers Teaspoons, one Sugar Shell, and 
ing something worth while for his people. Working on this Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twelve to fifteen 
line a pastor can almost always leave the church paper behind new subscriptions. 

him as a permanent blessing to the home he has visited He No . 6 . To tbe ones who wiu gecure ten subscriptions we 
may not always ifind the family with the money at hand, but give their choice of the following premiums: 
it he will take the subscription to be paid m 30 or 60 days and 

send along the name we will start the paper at once. A. One Set Eogers Triple Plate Tablespoons, one Set 

If at the expiration of the 30 or 60 days the money is not Rogers Nickle Silver Knives and Forks in a nice box. 
forthcoming, all the pastor has to do is to drop a postal card B. One Set Stag Handle Carver, consisting of Carving 
notifying the office and the name will be charged off the ae- Knife, Fork and Steel. 

count. This is the best way to sample our people and get them . ~ „ . . , . ^ .. „ , 
interested in the church paper. R °- ° ne J?* Aluminum Ware, consisting of one Aluminum 
„ , , , i -i 6-quart Pudding-Pan, one 5-quart Aluminum Milk Pan, one 
Many of our people know nothing about our church paper. Aluminum Dipper, and one Aluminum Cake-Pan. 
They have not even seen a copy. It would be a revelation to 

many who have never thought of it, if they could make a # * # 

list of the really intelligent families in our city churches, as In addition to the above we offer the following 

well as in the country, where the inmates of the home could not 

even tell the name of their Conference paper. We desire this Grand Prizes 
year to furnish sample copies to such homes if the pastors 

will give us names and addresses, provided the pastor will fol- 1. To the one sending in the largest number of new sub- 
low up the samples with a diligent effort to secure them as sub- scribers, provided the number shall not be less than 50, we 
scribers. offer, in addition to the premium, one No. 2690 Forbes Quadru- 
Where the pastor prefers he can arrange for a canvass P le Plate Tea Set » consisting of one 2y 2 pt. Tea Pot, one Sugar 
through a committee or some representative of the church. Bowl, one Cream Pitcher, one Spoon Holder handsomely en- 
For instance, a Baraca class or Philathea class will frequently graved, and one Butter Dish. 

prove a very effective helper in such work. Always give us 2. To the one securing the second largest number of new 
time to supply at least two sample copies before the canvass is subscribers, the number not to be less than 40, we offer : One 
made. Nickle-Plated Coffee Percolator Machine, that does away 

We are trying very hard to give our people a paper without with the tannic acid in coffee, and furnishes the pure juice 
so much space devoted to advertising. We hope our people of the coffee, especially adapted to the use of old persons 
will show their appreciation of this by increasing our circula- who are deprived of the use of the beverage on account of its 
tion. In order to have a paper clear of advertising of any injurious effect. With this machine, you can make the best 
doubtful character, we have cut out from $1200. to $1500. per drip coffee in five minutes, without injurious qualities, 
annum of our usual income from this source We must have 3 To the Qne securin the tMrd la t number of new 
a larger income from subscriptions in order to compensate for subscribers, the number not to be less than 30, we offer: 
this loss. One Satin-Finished Tilting Triple Plate Water Pitcher, in 

Our Job Printing Department is run to supplement the in- tilting frame, 
come of the Board so as to enable them to maintain a paper of /' _ „ , „ 
worthy and high standard without depending upon the income , 4 - ., To th « °™ securing the fourth largest number of new 
from advertising. We shall be glad to discard all advertising subscribers, the number not to be less than 25, we offer : One 
except schools and other church institutions if our people will Housekeeper s Casserole, with mcke outside cover-a beauti- 
rally to us and make it possible for us to do so. ful article ' ^ smtable f or s table. 

Last year we distributed nearly 100 sets of China as pre- 5- To the one securing the fifth largest number of new 
miums mostly among our pastors. This year we want to fur- subscribers, the number not to be less than 20, we offer : One 
nish every one of them with an outfit of nice silverware. Kitchen Set, consisting of one Meat Broiler, Ice Pick, Meat 

Fork, Basting Spoon, Butcher Knife, Bread Knife, Cleaver, 
„ . , . •, t» . Paring Knife, Can Opener, Bread Toaster, and one ten-hook 
Series of Premiums and Prizes rack t0 hold above _eieven pieces in aU. 

Following is an outline of our premiums and prizes to 6. To the one securing the sixth largest number of new 
which there may be some additions later, and of which we hope subscribers, the number not to be less than 15, we offer : One 
in a week or two to show cuts fully illustrating each one. Ladies' or Gents' Pearl Handle Good Metal Pocket Knife. 
Our friends may rest assured that aU the goods offered are In each cage it v ^erstood that the renewals are to 
genuine first class articles and every one will appeal especially be coUected and ^ ease of the failure of any old subscribe r to 
to a preacher s wife While we prefer that the pastors and re a new subscriber ^ t0 be fou nd to take the place of 
their wives take up this work and secure the premiums, yet, in the Qne ^0^^ no ease can a premium or prize be 
case they do not care to they may turn it over to any members awarde d where the renewals are neglected, 
of the congregation who are willing to undertake it. 

Cash must accompany each name sent in, except where 

_ . , „ • . , _. . the pastor is willing to become absolutely responsible. 

List of Premiums and Prizes T \ . . ° * * . 

Let the work begin at once so that all may have the benefit of 

No. 1. One 26-piece Wm. Rogers Triple Plate 12 oz. Silver the paper for the Conference year.. 

Set, consisting of one Oak or Mahogany Chest, Six Knives, Address all correspondence regarding the above to 

Six Forks, Six Tablespoons, Six Teaspoons, One Sugar Bowl BOARD OF PUBLICATION 

and One Butter Knife. The above will be given to the one ' 

who secures fifty new subscribers. Greensboro, N. C. 




1 




■ 




Official Orpt of tk lUestern Gortfc Qrolinaeonference 
HWbodist episcopal Ourcb, Soutl) 



Thursday, February 5, 1914 




Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 5, 1914 



Note and Comment 



Goethals to Be Governor of Panama 

Col.' George W. Goethals, who built the Pana- 
ma Canal, has been appointed by President Wil- 
son the first governor of the Panama Canal 
Zone. . His duties as governor begin April 1. 
The "Panama Canal act provides that the salary 
of the. governor be $10,000 a year, but Represen- 
tative Britten, of Illinois, has introduced an 
amendment to the bill making the salary $15,- 
000 a year, while Col. Goethals remains gov- 
ernor. 

Mayor Mitchell of New York City was very 
anxious to secure the services of Goethals at the 
head of the police department of that city, and 
in order to get him was willing- to put the 
whole police service practically upon a military 
basis. This flattering offer from the mayor of 
New York, no doubt, had something to do with 
the provision by Congress for tho increase of 
CoL Goethal's salary while in Panama. 

The President and Mexico 

President Wilson has given it out that, not- 
withstanding newspaper reports to the contra- 
ry, his policy of ' ' watchful waiting ' ' still main- 
tains, as to Mexico, and will continue until de- 
velopments make a change desirable. The em- 
bargo on arms has not been lifted, though he 
has been hearing arguments for and against. 
The President admits that the embargo pre- 
vents the Constitutionalists from securing mu- 
nitions of war from the only sourcq<really acces- 
sable to them, while the Federals have access 
to seaports that puts them in tpuch with other 
nations. 

State Religion for China 

Confucianism has been adopted by the Ad- 
ministrative Council as the state religion of 
China. When President Yuan Shi Kai dis- 
solved the Chinese Parliament, a little while 
ago, the Administrative Council, by order of 
the President, came to occupy the place of 
Parliament, but is really an instrument of Yuan 
Shi Kai. This action of establishing a state re- 
ligion, therefore, is an act of the President of 
China, who thinks that China needs "the mor- 
al building influence of religion." Political 
considerations, unquestionably, i&fluenced the 
Chinese President also, for he at this time needs 
every help he can get. With the ' followers of 
Confucious constituting the bulk of' the Empire, 
this action would naturally strengthen him with 
the people. 

What effect will this have upon the work of 
Christianity in China ? Very little in all prob- 
ability. People are not made Christians by roy- 
al edicts, neither are they unmade by similar 
processes. Undue importance was attached to 
the attitude of China's first President toward 
Christianity. Some seemed to think if that 
Christian ruler should remain in control of the 
government it would be only a little while till 
China would become Christian. Now, some will 
rush to the conclusion that the establishment of 
the worship of heaven and of Confucious as the 
national religion is a heavy blow to the progress 
of Christianity. Such notions are exceedingly 
superficial. 

With religious freedom, guaranteed by trea- 
ties with several of the leading nations of the 
world, Christianity will have as favorable op- 
portunity in China as it has had at any time in 
the past. Of course, it is unfortunate for any 
nation to have a state religion. It is unfortu- 
nate for England, "Germany and all the rest 
of the nations so situated. 



Millsaps College Suffers Heavy Loss by Fire 

Millsaps College, the leading educational in- 
stitution of the Methodist church in Mississ- 
ippi, was visited on January 28 by a fire that 
destroyed one of the three-story main buildings 
of' the college. In the building burned were the 
college offices, the chapel, the literary society 
halls and class rooms. The origin of the fire 
is unknown. The loss is estimated at $50,000, 
partially covered by insurance. 



Forty- Three Perish When Steamer Goes Down 
Off Vfif^nia Coast 

In £he r eai?y morning hour of January 30, the 
steamer M®iroe, of the Old Dominion Line, 
bound from Norfolk to New York, was nosing 
along at half speed through a dense fog and in 
a heavily running sea, when the steel prow of 
the liner Nafitucket, steaming from Boston to 
Norfolk, plowed into the side of the Monroe, 
sending her to the bottom of the sea in less 
than ten mijautes. Of the ill-fated vessel nine-, 
teen passengers and twenty-four of the crew 
were lost. Thirty-six passengers and fifty-five 
of the crew were rescued by the Nantucket. 

When the crash came at 1 AO o 'clock in the 
morning, all on board the Monroe were asleep 
except Captain J ohnson and the watch on deck. 
But the shivering of the stricken vessel as the 
water poured in through the gash in her side 
aroused the passengers and sent them hurrying 
to the decks, While the Monroe careened to the 
side and went down so quickly that there was 
little time to prepare for escape. 

The official statement of the Old Dominion 
Company concerning the disaster follows : 

"The Monroe left Norfolk at 7:40 and ran 
into a light fog when outside of the capes and 
was proceeding cautiously on her route to New 
York, blowing a fog whistle every minute by an 
automatic clock. She passed two vessels, stop- 
ping in each case when she heard their signals. 
When about half way between Cape Charles 
Lightship and the Winter Quarter Lightship 
she heard the fog whistle of the Nantucket off 
her starboard bow. She stopped and blew two 
whistles, which was responded to by the Nan- 
tucket. She blew again two whistles which was 
not responded to, and immediately thereafter 
the crash came. 

' ' The Nantucket was not visible except imme- 
diately before the collision, the fog being heavy 
near the water but light above. ' ' 

Another Wireless Hero 

With the account of the sinking of the Mon- 
roe comes the story of wireless operator Kuehn, 
who, after giving the call "S. O. S.," adjusted 
a life preserver whereby he could escape. But 
he took it on his own body and placed it on a 
girl and J^s himself perished with the ship. 

Disasters at- .sea have revealed so many of 
these wireless heroes within the last few years, 
since they have become essential on board of 
all vessels, that we are inclined to ask why are 
they about to show themselves, as a class, about 
the bravest and best of all the brave men that 
live upon the seas? All honor to the lads who 
send out the calls for help and stay with the 
ship so long as they can render aid, even at 
the cost of their own lives. 

A Hotel for Self-Respecting Men Out of a Job 

At 18 South Peoria Street, Chicago, Charles 
G., Dawes, president of the Central Trust Com- 
pany of Illinois, has built as a memorial to his 
son, Eufus, a hotel for the man who is trying 
to get back on his feet. It is not the purpose 
of the builder, who has invested $100,000, to 
provide lodging for any man, but to furnish at 
small cost clean, comfortable accommodations 
while in search of employment. Five cents is 
the price of one of the 200 beds in the ward- 
house ; ten cents is charged for a bed in a pri- 
vate room, of which there is a hundred. Soup, 
coffee, doughnuts and pie constitute a meal, for 
eight cents. Men register as at any other hotel, 
but are required to take a free shower bath be- 
fore going to bed. 

The hotel opened on New Year's Day and on 
the second night it was filled with guests by 
eight o'clock. In connection with the hotel is 
an employment bureau free to guests. 

A Prophecy of the New York Stock Exchange 
that Is to Be 

Mr. William' C. Van Antwerp, a member of 
the New York Stock Exchange who is work- 
ing, it is saidj'for the elevation of its standards 
and the purification of its processes, declares 
that Wall Street will yet win the respect and 
admiration of the whole people. Here is what 
he says: >iti 

" Heresies ; and schisms come and go; man- 
made laws^appear and disappear; but the hu- 
man heart does not change, and in the last 



analysis we come to know that only righteous- 
ness exalteth a nation. We of the Stock Ex- 
change know this today better than we ever 
knew it before, and we intend to live by it 
through the years. We shall make mistakes, no 
doubt, but we shall stick to our standards and 
rejoice in them, and some day — mark my word 
— this great market place will earn the admira- 
tion and respect of the whole people. 

"We are determined to show our critics by 
our deeds that the Stock Exchange means some- 
thing vital and vitalizing in America, that it is 
an important adjunct of the new Wall Street — 
a broad highway from ocean to ocean, doing its 
utmost to meet the needs of a happy and pros- 
perous land." 

A most eloquent and optomistic speech this! 
But some of us will wait just a little to see 
whether the bulls and bears of Wall Street, that 
have been feeding on the people so long, have 
really become public benefactors or not. It 
may take Mr. Van Antwerp some little time to 
train his Wall Street beasts to become useful 
work animals. 

# • # * 

About Other Churches 

The Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, New 
York City, paid last year for Home and For- 
eign Missions, $105,539. The amount raised for 
all purposes reached almost six hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

In point of membership the First Presbyte- 
rian Church, Seattle, Washington, is the larg- 
est Presbyterian church in the world. It now 
has a membership of 5,000, of which 807 were 
received the past year. Dr. Mark A. Matthews 
is the pastor. 

Bishop John M. Walden, of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, died January 21, at Dayto- 
na, Florida, where he had gone for the winter. 
He was elected bishop in 1884. For almost 
half a century, he has been influential in the 
councils of his church. As teacher, sditor, pas- 
tor, secretary of Freedmen's Aid Society, pub- 
lishing agent and Bishop he was preeminently 
useful. 

The foreign mission boards of three churches 
in the United States report more than a mil- 
lion dollars for missions by each of these church- 
es. Here are the figures: Northern Presby- 
terian, $1,837,600; Methodist Episcopal, $1,- 
539,400 ; Northern Baptist, $1,195,500. 

The Christian Advocate (New York) says 
that the Federal Council commissioners of the 
M. E. Church held a preliminary meeting at 
Cincinatti before the Joint meeting at Nash- 
ville, and adopted an important address which 
will appear in the columns of that paper as 
soon as space will permit. 

Then by way of intimating the content of the 
forthcoming address, the Advocate says: "It 
recognizes the present impracticability of or- 
ganic union, and while praying for that far off 
divine event, commends the plan of the Federal 
Court of Arbitration to compose frontier antag- 
onisms. ' ' 



A Black Wall Map of the World 

This paper has arranged with the publishers 
of an Ebony Black Wall Map to send one fully 
prepaid to our readers who will cut out this ar- 
ticle and mail it with fifty cents in stamps to 
pay for printing, packing and prepaying this 
wonderful map. It has white lines that clearly 
differentiate the divisions of the earth, showing 
oceans, countries, capitals and distances. From 
it you can get more information than you can in 
a year's study of books. The 17 different flags 
of the United States are here in their true col- 
ors. How few people know we have 17 flags. 

On the other side of the map are the portraits 
of our 27 presidents and their biographies, and 
a large map of our great nation in lovely colors. 

The price of these two maps is $2, printed on 
them. But you can obtain them, fully prepaid, 
by clipping out this article — any date — and 
send with 50 cents to 

North Carolina Christian Advocate, 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Or add 36 cents to your subscription, either 
new or renewal, making $1.86 in all. Send 
today. 

The church must guard against the encroach- 
ment of her pulpit. A church without strong 
virile preaching must soon go into decay. 



HortD Carolina Christian Advocate 



ESTABLISHED 18SS 



H. M. BLAIR. Editor 



Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference oj the M. E. Church, South 



$1 .50 Pel Annum in Adruc i 



Volumn LIX 



GREENSBORO, N. C, FEBRUARY 5, 1914 



Number 5 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 

Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Tear Jl.BQ 

Six Months ?5 

To all preachers of the Gospel, per year 1.00 

Make all remittances to CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, 
Greensboro, N. C. 

The label on paper shows the date to which sub- 
scription has been paid. Subscribers are ureently re- 
quested to attend promptly to renewals. It is not 
our custom to discontinue the paper when the time is 
out unless notice is given. Subscribers who do not 
intend to pay for the paper for over-time should notify 
the office to discontinue. Do not ask the pastor to 
have paper discontinued, but send notice direct to this 
office. 







EDITORIAL 


♦ 



Rev. John W. Jones 

The cut on our first page gives a good likeness 
of one of the conspicuous personalities in the 
Western North Carolina Conference. Brother 
Jones is a native of Iredell county. He was born 
near Mooresville more than fifty years ago. He 
was brought up on the farm. His early educa- 
tional opportunities were meagre, and he did 
not fully discover himself till after his 
marriage. Perhaps his wife helped him 
to discover himself, for, like a sensible 
woman, she encouraged him in every way 
to seek an education, and about 1876 he enter- 
ed school at Rutherford College and continued 
till he joined Conference in 1880. 

From the first he took rank as a strong 
preacher and one of our most successful pastors, 
serving on circuits, stations and on the Morgan- 
ton District, till his health gave way. 

For a number of years he has held a super- 
numerary relation, but all the time doing much 
work, assisting other pastors and doing supply 
work., He has done much for Rutherford Col- 
lege at different times as financial agent and as 
president of the Board of Trustees. 

He is working at present to establish an In- 
surance Association whereby all church proper- 
ty in the state may be protected by insurance. 
His heart is in the regular pastoral work and, 
but for a nervous affliction which forbids, he 
would be there regularly. He has great evange- 
listic gifts, and through his ministry many have 
been brought into the Kingdom. 



Prohibition that Will Prohibit 

This is what we are to have at the hands of 
our next legislature, because this is what our 
people are determined to have. 

At a meeting of the Executive Committee of 
the North Carolina Anti-Saloon League held in 
the Superintendent's office at Raleigh on Thurs- 
day night, January 29th, it was decided with 
enthusiasm to begin at once a campaign under 
the direction of the Superintendent for an 
amendment to our law which will prohibit ex- 
press companies and other public carriers from 
delivering liquor for beverage purposes to par- 
ties in this state. 

At first there were some of the committee in- 
clined to hesitate, fearing that this might be re- 
garded as a radical step, but, after discussion it 
seemed clear that this is just what the last legis- 
lature would have done if it had been possible 
to enforce such a law at that time. Since then, 
however, the enactment of the Webb law by 



Congress has given dry states the right to bar 
these shipments and the Committee feel that 
they are but responding to the demand of pub- 
lic sentiment in inaugurating such a campaign. 

So it is understood that the issue is squarely 
drawn and that every force will be lined up for 
a clean sweep of the last vestage of this in- 
iquitous business by our next legislature. Let 
every true soldier of the cross stand in his place 
and we shall see victory perched upon our ban- 
ners before another year rolls, round. 



A Remarkable Woman 

The death of Mrs. Ann Eliza Pease, which oc- 
curred at her home in Asheville last week, re- 
moved from active service one of the most use- 
ful Christian workers, as well as most remark- 
able women of this country. Born in the state 
of New York, April 12, 1823, trained in the 
Christian home of a Presbyterian elder, she be- 
came the wife of a Methodist preacher in young 
womanhood. As the companion of Rev. L. M. 
Pease, she was soon in New York City, organ- 
izing the work for the moral and. social up- 
lift of the neglected thousands in that great 
city. The result of their work was the organ- 
ization of the Five Points Mission, a work the 
value of which eternity alone will be able to 
reveal. Concerning the value of their work 
here, Jacob Riis recently wrote Mrs. Pease a 
letter of appreciation. 

Dr. and Mrs. Pease came to Asheville in 1870. 
Immediately they identified themselves with 
Central church and with the active religious 
and educational work of the community. Hav- 
ing considerable means they saw their oppor- 
tunity for using it to the glory of God in pro- 
viding educational opportunities for poor girls. 
The Holston Conference declining to undertake 
the work, they gave to the Northern Presbyte- 
rian church the money for founding the Normal 
and Collegiate Institute, also for enlarging the 
Home Industrial School. They were also in- 
strumental in securing the building of the Liv- 
ingston colored chapel and the Allan Industrial 
School for colored girls. The fact is they were 
always ready to lend a helping hand in every 
good work. 

The deceased also devoted much of her time 
to the interests of children, and as a memorial 
for this work the Pease Memorial House was 
erected in Asheville by the Northern Presbyte- 
rian church on the property, valued at $30,000, 
which was deeded by Dr. and Mrs. Pease to the 
Home Mission Board of the church for the ben- 
efit of the two schools there. 

Mrs. Pease was also a great power in the 
W. C. T. U. work of the State, and did much 
to help bring the State to its present enviable 
position as a leader in progressive prohibition 
measures. 

Faithful to her church, serving her genera- 
tion faithfully by the will of God, at the age 
of 91 she is translated and takes up her abode in 
everlasting habitations. Upon whom has her 
mantle fallen 1 



Supervision of Work in the Far East 

The episcopacy as we have it must spend its 
force in the work of supervision. The mere 
functions of the office in so far as they relate to 
ordination, etc., are insignificant. We could do 
without all of that and be nothing worsted. But 
we do need an alert and aggressive superinten- 
dency that will keep in touch with the move- 
ments of population and thoroughly familiar 
with the changes in social and political condi- 
tions. No supervision at long range can be re- 
lied upon to keep our work and workers prop- 
erly adjusted, especially in a great country 



such as is included in what is known as the Far 
East. Heretofore, perhaps, we have done well 
to rely mainly upon the men and women on the 
ground to direct our Bishops who have been 
content to make flying visits ; but with half the 
world waking up around them, we believe the 
time has come for the inauguration of a new 
policy of supervision. 

The Texas Christian Advocate, in a very 
frank and candid discussion of this subject last 
week, declares that our present policy is alto- 
gether inefficient, and we agree with Dr. Ran- 
kin that there is a demand for some real con- 
structive legislation on the part of the approach- 
ing General Conference. We remember how, at 
the Conference at Birmingham, the late Dr. 
Young J. Allen vehemently condemned our pol- 
icy of sending men to China to do things who 
had no practical knowledge of the conditions 
nor any acquaintance with the people of that 
country. True, what he referred to at the time 
was not our method of Episcopal supervision, 
but might well have been applied to this. He 
was speaking directly to the question of our 
management of the publishing interests in Chi- 
na. 

By every token it seems to us that the time 
has come for us to provide for Episcopal su- 
pervision in the Far East by selecting one who 
has seen years of service there, and who, being 
familiar with conditions and thoroughly accli- 
mated, is willing to remain there indefinitely. 
Dr. Rankin says : 

' ' Under our present plan a Bishop is expect- 
ed to make a flying trip of a few weeks or a 
few months at most and learn all about the 
needs of those fields and of the condition of 
our work as at present organized! It is pre- 
posterous. A Bishop is worth more, and a great 
deal less expense at home. We do get some real 
service from him here ; but his importance and 
influence in that foreign field are reduced to a 
minimum. He has merely been to China, Japan 
and Korea and returned home ! He tells us 
about his visit and we get just about as much 
out of it as we do out of a book of travels — 
with the addition of a wise man's observation 
and experience. 

It has long seemed to us that we ought to 
change our usage or law on this question in such 
a way as to assign a Bishop to that far-off field 
and let him spend the most of his quadrennium 
there on the ground, like the Northern Meth- 
odists do, and then he will have an opportunity 
to study conditions, to investigate needs, to ac- 
quaint himself with those people and their cus- 
toms, and thus make himself of active service to 
the Church in that part of the world. Else, if 
not this, we had better take the money that is 
thus spent each quadrennium and put it to some 
better use and learn the facts of that far-off 
land from those in the field. 

Why not require the Bishop sent to that field 
to spend a quadrennium there as a resident 
Bishop, or elect some man now on the field who 
will live there and give personal supervision 
to the work ? By such an arrangement we will 
save money to the cause and serve the Church 
to very much larger advantage. We have tried 
the "flying visit" plan for all these years and 
we have demonstrated its impotency as an effec- 
tive method of Episcopal supervision in that 
field. At least the suggestion, while a trifle rad- 
ical, is worthy of consideration. ' ' 



To every worldly-minded man, many of 
whom are in the church, Jesus sends the chal- 
lenge: "What shall it profit a man if he shall 
gain the whole world and lose his own soul?" 
Some man who reads this will wonder why he 
so often worries with his business till 12 o 'clock 
on Saturday night. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 5, 1914 



» * 

Contributions 

» » 

Where the Knights of Ezelah 
Comes In 

We have entered upon the age of the child. 
The theory of his importance in the kingdom of 
God has been accepted. The Church is steadily 
changing its practice to agree with the theory. 

We have now reached the age of segregation. 
All children cannot be treated alike. Hence 
children of even slightly different ages are as- 
sembled in separate groups, and children of 
opposite sex, after the age of twelve, are ar- 
ranged in groups apart from each other. 

Since the practice of segregation began, the 
boy has rapidly gained a position of great im- 
portance in the estimation of leading educators 
and ministers. This is the day of the Boys' 
Club, the Boys' Department of the Y. M. C. A., 
and the Boy Scouts of America. The last- 
named movement is the colossal enterprise of 
the world on behalf of the boy. It extends to all 
countries and enrolls millions of boys in its 
membership. 

At bottom all these specially organized activ- 
ities mean one thing — that is, that the boy mer- 
its more attention than has heretofore been giv- 
en him ; that he requires more direction than he 
has reeived; that he is hungry for more in- 
struction than we have thought it worth while 
to impart. 

The Church sees this plain truth, and it is 
determined to conduct an adequate program of 
instruction and training in religion for the boys 
under its care. It is resolved to do something 
more for its boys than merely to gather them 
into a Sunday school class for half an hour once 
a week. Its purpose is to extend the interest of 
the teacher of the class to cover all the days of 
the week, and it intends to bind all the boys of 
the Church together in a brotherhood that shall 
develop in them a feeling of unity and train 
them in practical co-operation. 

The expansion of interest in the boy begins in 
the Junior period, with supplemental work in 
the Sunday school and special activities in the 
Junior League. In the Wesley classes of Inter- 
mediate and Senior grades, including boys from 
thirteen to seventeen years of age, the current 
deepens. There will be found provision for ex- 
tending the activities of the boys beyond the 
class period, as well as for widening the scope 
of instruction to include other books besides the 
Bible. 

To provide for giving expression to the prin- 
ciples of unity and co-operation, thus aiding the 
realization of the intention of the Wesley class- 
es, the Church has created a boys' society of its 
own. The name of the society is the Knights of 
Ezelah. 

The local organization is called a Camp. The 
membership of the Camp is composed of boys 
between twelve and sixteen years of age. Boys 
nine years old are allowed to enroll as candi- 
dates, but they may not sit in the regular meet- 
ings of the Camp. 

The Camp is organized under the directiou 
of a superintendent appointed by the pastor. 
The officers are a King, Prince, Scribe, and 
Treasurer, elected by ballot from among the 
members. There are three committees in every 
Camp. A Religious Work Committee conducts 
studies in missions, Church history, and Church 
government. A Friendship Committee directs 
the benevolent activities of the boys. A Recre- 
ation Committee has charge of athletics, scout- 
ing, and all social pursuits. 

Every Camp meets regularly twice a week, on 
Friday evenings for business and on Sunday 
afternoons for religious work. 

A feature of the Knights of Ezelah which ap- 
peals strongly to the boy's primary interest is 
the initiation into the degree. Boys of nine 
years of age are anitiated as candidates into the 
Page's degree. Then there are three degrees 
in the Camp proper— the Shepherd 's degree, the 
Squire's degree, and the Knight's degree. Tests 
for the degrees involve the boy's attendance at 
Sunday school, his conduct, and his proficiency 
in Bible study. The initiations follow expe- 
riences in the life of David and require close fa- 
miliarity with the Bible story of the hero. Each 
degree is set to inculcate an important truth. 



This is the second official announcement of 
the Knights of Ezelah. As the society is in the 
early stages of its development, the literature 
of the order is scant. Headquarters, however, is 
prepared to supply the demand for all that is 
needed to organize a Camp. The manual, leaf- 
lets, and application blank for a charter will be 
sent to any one on request of ten cents. Every 
charter granted will carry with it the ritual 
containing the secrets of the order. The char- 
ter and ritual cost thirty cents, postpaid. Ad- 
dress all inquiries to the Knights of Ezelah, 810 
Broadway, Nashville, Tenn. 



A Plea for Union 

When Grant met Lee at Appomattox and 
agreed upon terms of peace, the question of 
slavery was settled forever in this republic. 
The common soldiers, on either side, stacked 
arms, and the two great leaders sheathed their 
swords, the barriers of war were thrown down, 
and the dove of peace unfurled her banner to 
the breeze, and the war between the states was 
over. Then the contending soldiers mingled to- 
gether, exchanged caps and knives and rejoiced 
and wept together. 

The victor, Grant, sharing prodigally of the 
sorrows of the vanquished Lee, whose very soul 
was weighed upon with that heaviness which 
war only can accumulate, and so profound that 
human calculation cannot fathom. After com- 
mingling they all turned their faces homeward 
to weep and rejoice alternately until time 
should heal the wounds of a bleeding nation, 
and dim the scenes of a horrible war. That 
was forty-nine years ago. Nearly two genera- 
tions of men have been swept from the stage of 
action since that memorable day. Yet the 
churches, the Great M. E. Churches, North 
and South, are at variance yet, and re- 
main in unwise and masterly inactivity, while 
the cause of Methodism languishes, and Roman 
Catholicism has crossed the Mason and Dixon 
line, and marching south with banners flying. 
Lee and Grant and their followers have given us 
lessons on forgiveness and union. Political par- 
ties, commerce and socialization have given the 
same lessons withal. ' ' Yet none of these things 
move me." 

There can be no plausible cause why this un- 
ion should not be consummated at once. Is 
there no strength in union? If not the wisest 
men who have ever dictated policies to Church 
or State, have turned out to heve been practical 
fools. If on either side there is a grievance 
or the ghost of one, meet at some Appomattox 
and let the soldiers of the Cross take pattern 
from those of carnage and blood. 

"I beseech you that you walk worthy of the 
vocation wherewith you are called, with all low- 
liness and meekness, with long-suffering, for- 
bearing one another in love; endeavering to 
keep the unity of the spirit in the bonds of 
peace. Let all bitterness and wrath and anger 
and clamor and evil speaking be put away from 
you, with all malice. ' ' 

A brother who resides farther north than we 
do here in North Carolina, writing in the Advo- 
cate recently said that he understood the north- 
ern spirit better than we do, that he has an- 
alized the northern spirit, and that it is much 
easier to love them at a distance than at close 
range. He does not like their spirit and cannot 
see how we could dwell with them in peace. He 
says there must be something peculiar about 
northern latitudes, etc. He says he has been 
reconstructed, in a sense, or to some extent, that 
he has got religion, too, since he followed Wheel- 
er in the war between the states, and even relig- 
ion has not changed his views about some things, 
but has influenced his attitude toward them. 
All right, brother, the above quotation covers 
your case, and all others who are afloat in that 
caliber of a boat. I am aware that certain 
brands of religion are not subjected to this quo- 
tation, neither are they based wholly on the 
Sermon on the Mount. 

The brother has tried reconstruction and re- 
ligion and they have widened the breach be- 
tween him and reunion. Brother, try one more 
remedy or one more "Re." Try regeneration. 
' ' They say ' ' that is good for estrangement, and 
see if union does not appear more probable. 
Shakespeare said : ' ' The quality of mercy is not 
strained," or something like that. But if it 
takes one kind of religion to save men in north- 



ern latitudes and another kind to save men in 
warmer zones, if that is not straining it must 
be stretching. 

And that love that can be bestowed upon its 
object the more profusely the farther it is away, 
is another modern passion that passeth under- 
standing. 

We have been under the impression down 
here that true love, old fashioned love, broth- 
erly love and all kinds of love tried to conceal 
the faults of its object and tried to correct 
them, and that distance, long continued, was 
its certain death. 

Another brother who has been circulating up 
north, in body or in mind, discovered a negro 
bishop. But the editor of the Advocate says it 
was a scare-crow so commonly seen in the South. 

Finally brethren, this division between the 
church is no frivolous matter, but a serious pro- 
position. Let the spirit of the lowly Nazarine 
guide us and the result will be union. Amen. 

J. E. Hood. 



Thy Will Be Done 

In January, 1866, I met a very interesting 
case in New Hanover County, North Carolina. 
James Bunting, a bright young man, had mar- 
ried a bright young woman and settled on a 
farm. In a few years he had lost the use of 
his legs and had to be Lifted from his bed to his 
chair and from his chair to his bed. For about 
six years he bitterly fought God. He then got 
conquered and converted. He read his Bible, 
good books and papers, and was a very happy 
man. 

One night he called his wife and asked her 
to twist his foot to relieve cramp in his leg. 
She did so. He said: "Sallie, did you hear 
that ? " She said : ' ' What is it ? " He replied : 
"My thigh is broken." He told his servant to 
go five miles and bring Dr. Satchwell. The doc- 
tor entered with a smile and said: "What's the 
matter, Jimmie ? ' ' He said, ' ' My thigh is brok- 
en. ' ' He asked : ' ' How did you break it 1 " He 
answered, "Sallie was twisting my foot for 
cramp." The doctor said: 'It isn't broken." 
Jimmie said, ' ' Examine it. ' ' The doctor found 
it was broken. Sallie fell across the bed and 
asked God to let her die. The doctor said the 
bone was rotten and that Sallie was not to 
blame for the breaking. Jimmie told his ser- 
vant to go quickly, fifteen miles, to Scott 's Hill, 
and bring his pastor. He got to the parsonage 
about the time we had finished an early break- 
fast. I told the boy to wait and get breakfast 
for himself and his horse. I dashed off to see 
the friend. When I entered his room it was 
pretty well filled with his neighbors. He greet- 
ed me cheerfully, saying : ' ' Brother Betts, for a 
long time I have been trying to say: 'Thy 
will be done.' Today I can say it all right. 
'Thy will be done.' Brother Betts, for twelve 
years I have been wanting to be immersed. God 
has plainly taught me that I must take it like 
my mother took it. I want you to baptize me 
here and let Sallie and me take the Lord 's Sup- 
per together before I go. " I baptized him and 
told the neighbors if any of them wished to 
take the Lord's Supper with us, to kneel at 
their chairs. They knelt. Some of them were 
Missionary Baptists. I never saw a brighter 
face than James Bunting had that day. God 
grant that this poor little writer and the readers 
of these lines may be able to say : ' ' Thy will be 
done" when the dark day comes. 

Greensboro, N. C. A. D. Betts. 



Your Thorn in the Flesh 

Your thorn in the flesh is— what ? Whatever 
it be that disorders, annoys, grieves you, makes 
life dark and your heart dumbly ache, or wets 
your eyes with bitter tears — counseled Samuel 
Longfellow, brother of our poet — look at it 
steadily, look at it deeply, look at it in the 
thought of God and his purpose of good, and 
already the pain of it will begin to brighten. — 
Exchange. 



Let nothing be done rashly o rin haste, for as 
one has well said: A mistake in life can be 
made in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, 
at the snapping of the fingures. But days and 
months, and sometimes years, are required to 
undo the thoughtless work. 



February 5, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



< i » 

Christian Life 

» 

Saved by a Song 

When the English steamer Stella was wrecked 
on the Casquet rocks, on the 30th of March last, 
twelve women were put into a boat, which the 
storm whirled away into the waters without a 
man to steer it, and without an oar which the 
women could use. All they could do was to sit 
still in the boat, and let the winds and waves 
carry them whither they would. 

They passed a terrible night, not knowing to 
what fate destiny was conducting them. Cold 
and wet, they must have been quite overcome 
but for the courage, presence of mind and mu- 
sical gifts of one of their number. This one 
was Miss Marguerite Williams, a contralto sing- 
er of much ability, well known as a singer in 
oratorios. 

At the risk of ruining her voice, Miss Wil- 
liams began to sing to her companions. Through 
the greater part of the night her voice rang 
over the waters. She sang as much of certain 
well-known oratorios as she could, particularly 
the contralto songs of "The Messiah" and 
"Elijah," and several hymns. Her voice and 
the sacred words inspired the women in the 
boat to endure their sufferings. 

At about four o'clock in the morning, while 
it was still dark, a small steam craft which had 
been sent out to try to rescue some of the float- 
ing victims of the wreck, coming to pause on the 
waters, heard a woman's strong voice some dis- 
tance away. It seemed to be lifted in song. The 
men on the little steam craft listened, and to 
their astonishment heard the words, ' ' 0 rest in 
the Lord," borne through the darkness. They 
steered in its direction, and before long came in 
sight of the boat containing the twelve women, 
and they were taken aboard. 

If it had not been for Miss William 's singing 
they would not have been observed, and very 
likely would have drifted on to death, as so 
many other victims of the wreck did. — Church 
Woman's Magazine. 



My Prayer 

It is said that John Wesley spent two hours 
of each day in prayer and many days more 
than this. He began to pray at four in the 
morning. One of his associates said of him: 
"He thought prayer to be more his business 
than anything else. I have seen him come from 
his place of prayer with his face shining. ' ' Mar- 
tin Luther, the little monk that stirred Europe, 
said : " If I fail to spend two hours in prayer 
in the morning, the devil gets the victory 
through the day." The saintly Francis As- 
bury was in the habit of rising at four and 
spending two hours in prayer and meditation 
on the Word. The godly Eobert M. McCheyne 
spent two hours in early morning and one hour 
after tea in prayer. George Midler, of Bristol, 
was always in prayer. Adonirom Judson could 
pray for hours at a time, and who can doubt 
that much of the present success of the Gospel 
in Burmah is due to the earnest petition he sent 
to heaven. David Livingstone knew how to 
pray and literally died upon his knees. These 
men prayed, God answered and things were 
brought to pass. 

Is not praying mighty prayer, our hope in 
the seemingly barren times on which we are 
falling? Will not Jehovah still answer with 
fire? We can see no other help for church or 
nation in these perilous times than the strong 
arm of Jehovah, and that arm is moved by 
prayer. Therefore, "to your tents, 0 Israel!" 
— Christian Intelligencer. 



Beauty for Ashes 

Some of those old Hebrew prophets had a 
faculty for picturesqueness that is the despair 
of the modern writer of Anglo-Saxon. If that 
modern writer could make people see things as 
did his brother in that far-off land and time, 
there would be a, chance of what he wrote liv- 
ing a few thousand years, too. 

"Beauty for ashes !" Can't you see the pic- 
ture? There sits the sorrow-stricken one, with 
the ashes of his grief upon his head. He has 
been hard hit. A friend has played him false, 



his fortune has taken wings and flnown away 
after he had spent a weary time in bringing 
it together, or the bit^rness of separation has 
come to him. And as he sits with the symbol of 
his grief upon his head, life seems to have noth- 
ing left, and the very sorrows of death lay hold 
upon his soul. 

But one comes to him with something in his 
hand and a message on his lips and flashing 
from his eager eyes. He tells his story, a story 
that changes winter into glorious summer for 
his friend, and thrusts a golden sun into the 
midst of a leaden sky. And then he hands him 
a garland for his hair, a symbol of hope and 
victory and triumph, to take the place of the 
dust and ashes that told only of defeat and a 
breaking heart. ' ' A garland for ashes. ' ' 

We don't know how far into the future the 
old prophet saw when he wrote those words, but 
we do know that the vision of his soul was a 
true and living one, and we do know that its 
fulfilment began two thousand years ago, and is 
hasting on to still more splendid realization 
in our own day and time. 

My, how the dust and ashes of failure and 
disappointment and sin seem to cover over all 
our poor human life and struggle and effort! 
Which way we look we see it, and sometimes 
we see nothing but it, and we sit down and 
write Ichabod across the whole face of the 
world. But did not One come, does not One 
come to give a garland for our ashes? Can He 
not, will He not, rub out our awful word of 
hopelessness, and stretch across the whole great 
circle of our human life the symbol of victory 
and reward and triumph? 

This is the gospel we should be believing and 
preaching by our life and words every day of 
the year. It is the gospel that we ought to be 
meeting the individual need and the social need 
of our time with. It is a splendid gospel, and 
as true as God himself; but my, what uncon- 
vinced and half-hearted preaching of it we do 
sometimes ! — Christian Guardian. 



A Reason for Praying 

There is one other occasion in our Master's 
life of prayer to which I want to lead the 
thoughts of my readers. ' ' Now it came to pass 
in those days he went out into a mountain to 
pray, and continued all night in prayer to God. 
And when it was day, he called unto him his 
disciples, and of them he chose twelve. ' ' There 
was a night of prayer, and then there was a 
great decision. Our Lord took time to pray 
before he made a momentous choice. We in 
our own degree have similar choices to make 
both in our individual and in our corporate 
life. We have to make choice of turnings in 
the ever-winding way. We have to choose our 
representatives in the city council and in par- 
liament. We have to choose ministers and 
church officials, and in a hundred other ways 
serious decisions have to be made. Why should 
we pray? We must, first of all, pray in order 
that big considerations might possess the mind. 
We are prone to live amid small motives, tiny 
purposes, belittling prejudices, partial and lop- 
sided ambitions. And there is nothing kills lit- 
tle things like our prayers. If we take our pol- 
itics into the realm of prayer, it is impossible 
for us to remain wretched partisans. We may 
give a party vote, but our vision will reach be- 
yond the bounds of party, and through a party 
triumph we shall seek the extension of the king- 
dom of God. When we pray we move into the 
realm of big things, big motives, big ideals. The 
biggest outlook comes to us when we are on our 
knees. 

And so when we are making big decisions, let 
us find time to pray, in order that the matters 
may be greatly decided, and that all little and 
belittling intrusions may be effectually de- 
stroyed.- — Dr. J. H. Jowett. 



Mother's Prayer the Secret , 

A bright young fellow of more than ordinary 
ability and success in business chose the way of 
a gay life, with total disregard for the church. 
His godly father and mother were crushed by 
his waywardness. To get away from their influ- 
ence, he left their home and city. He went to 
the far' West, but they never gave him up. 
They called upon the church to join with them 
in prayer for him. In less than a year things 
came into his life which caused him to lose his 



position and compelled him to return home. On 
one occasion he went to church with his father, 
but made light of the service and the church in 
general. His health became impaired and he 
went down rapidly, and for weeks lingered be- 
tween life and death. He told his mother that 
if God would raise him up he would serve him. 
He began to improve at once, and for more than 
a score of years has been a successful lay 
preacher. ' ' The fervent prayer of the righteous 
availeth much in its workings." — Selected. 



A Sad Journey 

"These shall go away into eveidasting punish- 
ment" (Ma„tt. 25:46). Away from sermons 
and songs and praise and Sabbath! Away 
from Christ, from hope, and heaven ! Away 
to the prison-house of remorse, "where the 
worm dieth not and the fire is not quenched ! ' ' 
No release, no hope, no return ! — Exchange. 



The Hindrance Removed 

Dr. J. Wilbur Chapman relates the fol- 
lowing : "I remember preaching in one of the 
cities in Indiana. For four days the church 
was crowded, but a crowd is not an indication 
of blessing. Not infrequently the presence of a 
crowd is an indication of defeat. During the 
four days there was not a hand lifted for 
prayer. I called the ministers together and 
asked them the privilege of closing my en- 
gagement, for there was some barrier in the 
way. One of the ministers requested that the 
decision should be held for a little, for he 
felt sure he knew where the difficulty was. 
As the leader of our force of personal work- 
ers, we had one of the members of this min- 
ister's church, a man well-known throughout 
his own State, and a judge of one of the 
highest courts. Somehow, it seemed that when 
this man passed through the audience he sent 
a cold wave over the people. From the con- 
ference of ministers the pastor of this church 
went into the office of this old judge, and 
said to him: 

"I have been hearing rumors on the streets 
for a long time that your life is not clean, and 
I have come to say if these rumors are untrue 
I desire to take some public stand with you 
to contradict them; but I have also come to 
say that if they are true, I will stand nearer 
to you than a brother, and help you to get 
free from the power of your besetting si.n' 

"The old judge looked a moment at him, and 
then put his head on his arms on the desk, and 
sobbed out : 

" 'They are all true, and more.' 

"In a moment they were on their knees in 
prayer, and it was but a moment more be- 
fore the judge rose a delivered man, free 
from the power of sin. 

"I was just lifting my hands to pronounce 
the benediction at the close of an afternoon 
service, when the church door opened and the 
judge came in. Having lifted his hand to ask 
permission to speak, he made this statement : 

" 'My friends, I have been known for many 
years as one of the members of this church, 
but for a long time my life has been robbed 
of its power and my soul of its peace. I have 
lost my influence in my home, and I fear almost 
altogether in my city ; but I have gotten right 
with my minister and right with God, and I 
have come to ask your forgiveness.' 

"The confession was made with sobs. There 
was no benediction pronounced that afternoon. 
The people all filed out one way. Some took 
the hand of the pudge to say, 'God bless you,' 
some to say nothing but to pass with tear- wet 
cheeks and burning hearts. But, when the ev- 
ening service came, and the sermon had been 
preached, there was a remarkable change. The 
atmosphere seemed like heaven. Fully fifty 
people pressed their way to the front to ac- 
cept Christ as their Saviour. The first man to 
come was the old judge, with his arm around 
a poor lost man, who was hopefully saved. In 
less than six days more than five hundred peo- 
ple came pressing their way to christ. " 



The home is a man's citadel or fortress. This 
being true he should not only defend it against 
assaults from without, but from foes within. 
Many a home has been blighted by what a man 
has himself invited to take shelter under his 
roof. 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 5, 1914 




A Splendid Map With Advocate for $1.86 
Send us $1.50 for one year's subscription to 
the North Carolina Christian Advocate, Greens- 
boro, N. C, and we will send you fully prepaid 
this Educative Map for 36 cents to pay for 
printing, packing and prepaying to you. Send 
$1.86 and get both. 

North Carolina Christian Advocate, 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Without the Advocate we will send the Map 
prepaid for 50 cents. 



Notes and Personals 



— Miss Annie Jones, daughter of ex-Sheriff 
B. E. Jones, was the winner of an automobile 
in the recent Daily News contest. 

— Kev. L. H. Griffith reports a great revival 
just closed at Pisgah on the Canton circuit. 
There were twenty-one conversions. 

— Rev. J. M. Wacaster, of Crestmont, reports 
good congregations and a revival recently closed 
on the circuit with more than fifty professions. 

— It is announced that Dr. J. Marvin Wells, 
of Shelby, will remove to Spencer about the 
middle of February, where he will locate for the 
practice of his profession. 

— Dr. G. E. Young, a prominent physician 
and business man of Forest City, died at his 
home in that place on last Friday afternoon. He 
was a member of the Baptist church. 

— The little six-year-old daughter of Rev. J. 
F. Starnes was carried to Meriwether Hospital 
recently for surgical treatment. We are glad 
to learn that she is recovering nicely. 

—Rev. G. H. Detwiler, D. D., of Nashville, 
Tenn., will preach the commencement sermon 
for Emory College, Oxford, Ga., this year, and 
Dr. James Cannon will deliver the literary ad- 
dress. 

—Rev. R. G. Tuttle, pastor of Central Meth- 
odist church, is issuing each week a bulletin, 
which gives a program of church services, and 
notes of interest to members of his flock. — : Al- 
bemarle Enterprise. 

- — The Shelby Star of January 30th, says: — 
Rev. Dr. J. R. Scroggs was brought home from 
Rutherfordton Hospital Sunday night and his 
many anxious friends will be glad to learn that 
he is far on the road to recovery. 

—We sympathize deeply with our friends of 
the Methodist church of Troy in the loss of 
their church by fire last week. The building 
caught from the old school building which stood 
nearby. The church was a complete wreck. 

— Rev. 0. P. Ader and his congregations at 
Ramseur and Franklinville paid all missionary 
assessments, foreign and domestic, in January, 
and the Ramseur congregation has raised a con- 
siderable amount and reported as special on 
missions. 

—We regret to learn that the Iotla High 
School building in Macon county was destroyed 
by fire one night last week. The building was 
valued at between $2,000 and 3,000, and was in- 
sured for $750. It is the purpose of the county 
school board to rebuild at once. 

— Rev. P. L. Terrill, pastor of the Pleasant 
Garden charge, was in the city on Friday morn- 
ing of last week and made the Advocate office a 
pleasant call. Brother Terrell seems encour- 
aged with the outlook for the work on his 
charge. He is a well tried field hand and we 
predict a year of success. 

— The many friends of Mr. John N. Wilson 
will regret to learn of the serious illness of his 
wife, who was stricken with paralysis on Sun- 
day night, January 25th. Mr. Wilson is the 
oldest son of the late Rev. Dr. N. H. D. Wil- 
i son, so well known for many years as a leader 
in North Carolina Methodism. 

— We regret to learn that two of the children 
of Rev. and Mrs. J. H. Green, of Leicester, have 
been quite ill with pneumonia for some days. 
The younger one is reported at this writing as 
critically ill. Advocate readers will join in a 
prayer for their speedy recovery and the bless- 
ing of God upon the anxious parents. 

—Rev. R. M. Taylor, pastor of the Methodist 
church at Norwood, spent a few hours here on 
Tuesday greeting old friends. Mr. Taylor is 
pleasantly remembered in Albemarle because of 



services here as pastor several years ago. He is 
one of those jovial-hearted and ever-busy min- 
isters who make the world a better place in 
which to live. — Albemarle Enterprise. 

— Rev. D. S. Richardson reports a very kind 
reception on the Davidson circuit. The board 
of stewards increased the assessment for pas- 
tor 's salary $100. The week of prayer and self- 
denial for missions was observed by one of the 
churches with nice contribution for mission spe- 
cials. The pastor is working and praying for 
large results. 

— Our people at Spencer are moving in ear- 
nest now for their new church. Last week 
Rev. Frank Siler joined hands with them in a 
thorough canvass for subscriptions. They ex- 
pect to build a church which will cost not less 
than $20,000. The present building, erected 
fourteen years ago, is now entirely inadequate 
to the needs of the congregation. 

— Rev. W. O. Goode is moving things in a 
lively way at Spring Garden, this city. The con- 
gregations are filling the house and one can feel 
the atmosphere of enthusiasm. Among other 
good indications is the large number of Sun- 
day school scholars attending the preaching ser- 
vice. A boy's club of nearly 200 has been or- 
ganized and great interest is manifested among 
the young people of the church. 

—Mrs. Abigail Northan Linker, a worthy 
member of our church in Mooresville, died at 
the residence of her daughter,, Mrs. T. L. 
Steele, in Statesville, on Sunday, Jan. 25th. 
Mrs. Linker was a native of Guilford county, 
but had spent her married life in Cabarrus and 
Iredell counties. The funeral was conducted on 
Monday in the church at Mooresville, by Revs. 
J. F. Kirk and C. S. Kirkpatrick. 

— Mr. Uriah L. Alspaugh, one of the most 
prominent citizens of Alexander county and for 
many years a steward in our church at Taylos- 
ville, died at his home near that place on Mon- 
day night of last week. Mr. Alspaugh had been 
in poor health for a number of years, and 
steadily declined during the last few months. 
He was nearly all his life a cotton manufac- 
turer, his father having been engaged in the 
business before him. He was a good man, a 
first-rate citizen and will be greatly missed. 

— We . sympathize deeply with Mr. and Mrs. 
W. M. Jordan, who recently moved from New- 
ton to Mount Airy to take charge of the Blue 
Ridge Inn. Their four-year-old daughter, Sa- 
rah Sharpe, died on Tuesday morning of last 
week. She had been ill of diphtheria shortly 
after Christmas and the disease had left her in 
bad condition. The immediate cause of her 
death was heart failure. The little form was 
laid to rest in Oakwood cemetery on Tuesday 
afternoon, funeral services being conducted by 
Rev. W. H. Willis. 

—Writing to friends as he was on the jour- 
ney to th.e place selected for our African Mis- 
sion, Bishop Lambuth, says: "Every day for 
the past three days we have met in one of the 
cabins and spent half an hour in prayer, after 
which Dr. Morrison gives us half an hour on 
the Baluba language and the alternate day on 
missionaries and their relation to government 
officials, to the Natives, and to other missions in 
the Congo. In this way we are availing our- 
selves of his large and helpful experience. It 
is a gracious Providence which has permitted 
his being with us. ' ' 

— The editor of the Advocate visited the 
church at Gibsonville on the fourth Sunday in 
January, preaching at the morning hour. Bro. 
Hales, the pastor, has things in good shape for 
cancelling the heavy debt which has been a han- 
dicap upon this church for a number of years. 
We do not know of a more interesting or prom- 
ising situation for out church. The town now 
has a population of about 1200 and is growing. 
Our people have erected a splendid house of 
worship, the congregation is growing and when 
released from the burden of debt will soon be 
self-supporting. It has been a hard pull but the 
plans were wisely laid in securing this property. 

— Last' week the Shelby Star had this item : 
Another most delightful and enjoyable hospi- 
tality given in honor of the ministers of our 
town and their wives, was the six o 'clock dinner 
party, which Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Hennesse gave 
Thursday evening at their attractive home on 
Marion Street. In the center of a perfectly ap- 
pointed' table and resting on a handsome center 
piece there stood a crystal vase of lovely red 



carnations and asparagus ferns. Five elegant 
courses were faultlessly served and most excel- 
lently prepared. The invited guests : Rev. and 
Mrs. T. D. Bateman, Rev. and Mrs. L. W. 
Swope, Rev. and Mrs. W. E. Abernethy, Rev. J. 
B. Sill and Miss Emma Frick. 

— We have learned with sincere regret of the 
death of Mr. Henry Kesler, of Rowan county, 
which took place at his home in the Providence 
community on the afternoon of January 28th. 
Mr. Kesler was a member of Providence church 
and for many years had been a faithful official. 
A man of sweet spirit and amiable disposition, 
he numbered his friends by the extent of his 
acquaintance. He was about 75 years old and 
leaves a widow and several children, among 
them Mr. J. C. Kesler, the present Treasurer of 
Rowan county. The writer learned to love and 
esteem Brother Kesler very much when serv- 
ing as his pastor several years ago. He served 
his generation faithfully by the will of God and 
now rests from his labors. 



First Church, Hickory 



All departments of the church are moving 
forward at a rapid pace under the able lead- 
ership of our new pastor. Rev. A. L. Stanford. 

Our congregations have been unusually 
large. The main auditorium has been crowded 
and the aisles filled with chairs at every ser- 
vice both day and night, and for the past two 
Sundays it has been necessary to open up the 
entire Sunday school room. 

We have had 38 additions to our member- 
ship, twelve on profession of faith. Our goal 
is 100 new members during the Conference 
year. 

Our Sunday school is thoroughly organized, 
having recently inaugurated the graded lesson 
system. Our gain has been more than 100 
since the first of the year. The Sunday school 
is also supporting a native worker in Korea. 
Much of our success is due to our superinten- 
dent, Mr. G. F. Ivey. 

But the climax was reached Sunday after- 
noon" in a men's mass meeting when it was 
unanimously decided to ask the mission board 
to give us a missionary to one of the foreign 
fields to be supported by this church. This 
is in addition to what the women's societies 
and the Sunday school are now doing:. We 
also have one member who is personally sup- 
porting one native worker. 

A. M. West, Lay Leader. 



Receipts of the Treasurer of the Board of Mis- 
sions of the Western N. C. Conference to 
Jan. 31, 1914 

On Assessments 

Foreign Domestic 

Newton, W. M. Biles $ 10.00 

Brevard Sta., W. M. Robbins 15 . 00 
Walnut St. and Carraway 

Mem., A. R. Bell 8.43 

Ramseur and Franklinville, 

O. P, Ader 91.00 124.00 

West End, M. D. Stockton, 

Treasurer 190.00 



Totals on Assessment .... $114 . 43 
Specials 

Morganton Dist, J. E. Gay. .$137.17 

Andrews, Frank Siler 

Murphy, Frank Siler .... 
West End, N. V. Stockton, 

Treasurer 150.00 

Salisbury Dist., J. F. Shinn 11.44 
Wadesboro, G. D. Hermon . . 35 . 31 
Albemarle, Central, .R G 

Tuttle 11.61 

Waynesville, District, L. T. 

Cordell 

Waynesville Station, M. F. 

Moores 

Ramseur and Franklinville, 

O. P. Ader 26.26 

Total for Specials $371.79 

$114.43 

Grand Totals $486.22 



$324.00 



81.41 
5.00 

16.66 



7.00 
50.00 



$160.07 
$324.00 

$484.07 



That Beautiful Map for only 36 cents added 
to your subscription, $1.86 in all. This offer 
will stand good through the month of February, 



February 5, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page. Seven 



Insurance Committee Meeting 

The committee appointed to organize an As- 
sociation for the insurance of church property, 
met at the Advocate office on Tuesday night of 
last week. A form of Charter as outlined by 
State Commissioner Young was adopted and as 
soon as signatures can be secured by all the 
members the application will go forward and at 
a later meeting officers will be elected and the 
organization it is hoped will be ready to begin 
operations. 



Alexander Circuit 



"We left Belwood after a four years' pastor- 
ate with that fine old charge, and came to Tay- 
lorsville on Dec. 10th, 1913. We left Belwood 
at 12 :30 P. M. on the 10th and came through 
the country in an automobile driven by our 
good friend, Mr. W. B. Porter, of Belwood, 
and arrived in Taylorsville at 6 :30 P. M. the 
same day. We found the parsonage ready 
for us with fires burning and supper ready 
with some elect ladies in charge. 

We have received a splendid welcome all 
around, and we think the outlook is for a good 
year. On the 13th of January about fifty of 
the Taylorsville people stormed the parsonage 
and gave us a big pounding. We will have 
remembrances of their visit for many weeks. 
This is a good charge with great possibilities, 
with enough work for two strong men. 

We have one of the best Sunday schools here 
in Taylorsville to be found anywhere. The 
whole work is well organized under the leader- 
ship of our efficient lay leader, R. L. Snow, 
who is also district lay leader. Sincerely, 

W. V. Honeycutt. 



Franklin Avenue, Gastonia 

We are making progress slowly and smooth- 
ly, but surely. We have an able Sunday school 
superintendent in Rev. F. W. Bradley. 

Our church could not have been better pleas- 
ed than to have had Brother N. C. Williams 
returned to us for another year. 

A few Sundays ago he held a church confer- 
ence at our place. Besides the usual correct- 
ing of the roll of church members, much tell- 
ing work for good was done. The conference 
was fortunate in the election of Brother Arthur 
Allen as recording secretary. A live mission- 
ary committee was appointed, composed of five 
energetic young ladies. 

Class leaders were appointed as follows : J. 
A. Plyler, J. L. and W. G. Jenkins. The 
church being unfortunate in the appointment 
of the writer as one of the above, he has en- 
deavored with the sanction of the other lead- 
ers to start prayer meeting at our church. Al- 
though no improvement can be made over the 
old time prayer meetings, I have proposed to 
different ones of our organized classes, espec- 
ially urging that they at least take a vote upon 
the proposition of buying the ten books put 
out by our publishing hoiise at half price, 
known as the "Methodist Library." These we 
will study and discuss. We will also have 
class meetings at the same time that we have 
prayer meeting. 

It seems unfortunate for Gaston county and 
the city of Charlotte that only the negro and 
Catholic men have any college for men that 
is within reach for anyone to attend going 
back and forth each day. This he could now 
do at less than half fare, thanks to the P. & 
N. Lines — a thing they have been doing for 
thirty years in New England. A college edu- 
cation may be worth ten dollars a day, but 
never will education be universal until you 
can daily attend. W. G. Jenkins. 

Isla Smith Avert 

Mrs. Isla Smith Avett died at her home at 
Granite Quarry, N. C, early Monday morning. 
Jan. 5th, 1914, after a protracted illness of 
nearly a year of that dread disease, Pellagra. In 
all her afflictions she was for the most part 
cheerful, and with every change that seemed to 
indicate a better condition she responded and 
would try to believe she was going to get well, 
but there was always a relapse that brought her 
nearer to what she really felt was soon to come. 

She was born October 20th, 187 5y and was 



married to Rev. E. M. Avett Dec..,2|)th, 1906. 
They lived happily together until GjOd took her 
home. To this union was born three children, 
two of whom are still living. 

She was the daughter -of Mrs. Addie Smith, 
of Stony Hill church on the Albemarle circuit, 
who, is well known for her deep piety and moth- 
erly interest in the preachers of her church and 
in the welfare of Stony Hill church in particu- 
lar. She was the sister of Mr. J. Newell Smith, 
of Hoke county, and also a sister, of Mrs. Blevin 
Smith Ingram, who died a little over three 
years ago. 

Sister Avett was converted early in life and 
joined the Methodist church, and so gave most 
of her life to the work of her Master. She had 
an experimental knowledge of Christ in her 
heart and was a witness of his saving grace. It 
was the joy of her life to dwell in the secret 
place of the Most High and to abide under the 
shadow of the Almighty. She was a faithful 
and active worker in the church. In her home, 
as a preacher's wife, there were many pressing 
duties, but she always took time to devote to 
the Lord's work. The Kingdom of God was 
always first in her thoughts:ahd' everything else 
was subservient to this one supreme thing. How- 
ever, she was not negligent about her home du- 
ties, fully realizing the claims that were made 
upon her there. It was here where her life 
shone most brightly; it was here perhaps she 
had the severest tests. Her first concern was to 
do right always. She lived her religion ; it was 
as much a part of her as the breath of life. 
She was always about her Master's business. 
She did what she could for her home, her church 
and her Lord. Wherever she went as a 
preacher's wife, and truly she was 1 a helpmeet 
to her husband, she left the impress of her de- 
vout life indelibly stamped upon the commun- 
ity. Of a bright, sunny disposition, she looked 
at everything in its best light and always had 
a host of friends wherever she went. 

During the last few weeks of her life that 
dread disease, got in its worst work and the 
mind was dethroned so that she did 1 no^t' leave us 
those bright words of hope to comfort and cheer 
us that would have been natural 1 fi?r r 'her ' to : 
leave, having lived the life she did ; but know- 
ing her life's intention before her' affliction 
overtook her, we know her faith w'^s fixed in 
Him who is able to save. 

To the bereaved mother, who will miss her 
daughter's loving solicitude for her comfort in 
her declining years, we pray that the Father 
may take her into His most tender care, and 
temper this severe affliction. May the loving 
Father smile upon the children, and help them 
to develop in their lives the same sweet, sunny 
spirit of their mother. May He guide and com- 
fort the father as he fights the battles of life 
alone, and attempts to win souls for the Master. 

Rev. H. C. Sprinkle, of Spencer, N. C, and 
the writer, with the official board from Gfan- 
ite Quarry church and a few friehds with 'the 
family, accompanied the body to Albemarle,'N. 
C, and thence out to old Stony Hill church 
cemetery, where it was laid to rest. The funer- 
al services were conducted by" Rev. H. C. Sprin- 
kle, assisted by several other preachers who 
were present. 1 "P. W. Tucker. 



Correction in Minutes 



I notice in the minutes of the last Confer- 
ence, just off the press, an error that really 
needs to be corrected, as it does an injustice, 
to the district and would give the casual read- 
er a wrong impression. In the Winston dis- 
trict, table 1, membership column^ the total is 
put down at "10526" members reported for 
"this year," over against "11,016" for 'last 
year, ' ' showing quite a heavy loss ; when by 
addition of the column it will be seen that the 
total would and ought to toe? ill, 52/7} which will 
show a net increase over and above all loss 
and error of 499. This same error is carried, 
down into the recapitulation tables where the 
same correction should be made it . In addition 
to this, in this table, the total, for the year 
appears as "members, 17,290: " when it should 
read 97,290. Adding the ■correction in the 
Winston district (of 499) and thy^, number of 
local preachers (194) it will be -found that 
the: total for " Members this year Jg 97,972, 
or an increase of 499 over the total given in 
the Minutes. •;.■>?■ 



These corrections make quite a difference 
in representing the church, both in the district 
and Conference. These statistics were assign- 
ed to me, and I feel that it is only just, to 
the Winston district and the Conference -4&at 
I make the correction. It seems I am respon- 
sible ' for the first error, as the addition is 
against me ; the latter is partially a typograph- 
ical error. W. Francke Sandford. 

Ill - ; M •• : L"..' 

: i A Correction 

The Minutes of our Conference for 1913, do 
not give the Granite Falls and Hudson Station 
credit for having done anything for our Chil- 
dren's Home last year, when, in fact, the charge 
paid and it was reported, $80 on assessment and 
about $20.00 fifth Sundays and some on buil- 
ding fund. D. F. Carver. 



China Grove 



I notice in the Minutes of our last Annual 
Conference .in the financial report of China 
Grove charge, in regard to assessment for 
preacher's salary, what seems to be a typo- 
graphical error: It should be : Assessed for 
preacher, $600.50, instead of $800.00. Will you 
please call attention to this correction in the pa- 
per that no one may be misled by the error? 
Sincerely yours, H. H. Robbins. 



Burnsville 

We were warmly received by the good people 
of Burnsville on Dec. 10th, and have had fine 
congregations at each service. We have a pleas- 
ing young people 's prayer meeting which meets 
each Wednesday evening. On last Sunday, 
Jan. 25, we organized a Junior League. We 
hope, through .the leadership of some of our 
consecrated young ladies, to reach the hearts 
of the children and bring them into the king- 
dom of God. We will do our best for the Ad- 
vocate. Pray for us, that we may have a gra- 
cious revival of religion during the year. 

Sincerely, Isaac F. Cotton. 



Program Leicester Circuit Rallies 

Thursday, Feb. 19— At Dick's Creek 

10 :00 a. m. Communion Service. 
10:30 a. m. Talk— Subject, "The Christian 
Home." 

10:55 a. m. Talk— Subject, "The Christian 

Community." 
11:10 a. m: 'Sermon on Missions — Rev. C. A. 

Wood. ' '■' '' 
12 :00 M. Canvass for Missions. 
12:10 p. m.' Dinner on the grounds. 
1:10 p. m. I Talks on Sunday School and Re- 
vival Wpi-k. 
1:50 p. m. Financial Systems. 

Friday, February 20 — Quarterly Conference 
at Leicester 

Saturday — February 21 — At Big Sandy 

10 :00 a. m. Sunday School Reports. 
10:15 a. m. Address— Rev. C. A. Wood. 
10:45 a. m, ( „ Communion Service. 
11:15 a. rn.. Sermon by Dr. Frank Siler r 

Canvass for Missions 
12 :15 p. m. ' Dinner on the grounds. 
1:30 p. mi 'A Model Christian Home*'— 

Rev. C: A. Wood. 
2 :00 " Socking the Lost ' '—Dr. Frank Siler. 
(Little Sandy and Chestnut Grove will unite 
with Big Sandy in this Rally.) 

Sunday, Feb. 22 — Simultaneous Preaching and 
Rallies 

Leicester, at 11:00 a. m., Rev. C. A. Wood; 
Brick Church, at 11 a. m., Dr. Frank Siler; 
Grace, at 11:00 a. ; m.,\ Rev. W, A. Newell; 
Western* Chapel; T at 3 :00 p. in., ReV.'^W: A. 
Newell; Little Sandy, at 3 :00 p. mi, Dr, Frank 
Siler; Teague's Chapel, at 3:00 p. m., Rev. 
C. A. Wood. 

We expect the grace of God to make this 
(February 22.)..t^e. ) grea.tes.t i 'day in $ie., history 
of Leicester circuit. We invite everybody 'of 
all denominations. Let everyone plan to come 
and b r i n g his neighbor also. 

Let all pray earnestly for the presence and 
guidance of the Holy Spirit. 

J. H. Green, Pastor. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 5, 1914 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mrs. W. H. Harris, Ashevllle, N. C. 



A BIRTHDAY MEDITATION 

Written by Mrs. A. E. Pease on the an- 
niversary of her ninetieth birthday 

I linger on the shores of time; 

Before me spreads an ocean wide. 
I gaze across its face sublime, 

Seeking in vain its farther side. 

Alas! there is no farther side, 

Eternity, Eternity! 
But on its islands fair abide 

Loved ones of earth awaiting me. 

Why do I wait? I wait His call, 
Who went my mansion to prepare; 

When it is furnished, furnished all, 
Then He will come to take me there. 

What can I do? What can I send 
To finish up my heavenly home, 

So that my ever loving Friend 
May bring the welcome message, 
"Come?" 



The Woman's Board of City Mis- 
sions and the Woman's Missionary 
Society of Central church, Asheville, 
of which she was the oldest member, 
and honorary president, have sustained 
a distinct loss in the death of Mrs. 
Ann Eliza Pease which occurred at 
her home in this city on the evening 
of January 27th, 1914. 

Ninety-one years was the time allot- 
ted to Mrs. Pease, and what a beau- 
tiful, consecrated life "was hers! A 
life spent in loving, faithful and un- 
tiring service to God and humanity 
— a life of unselfishness and usefulness. 
The worth of her noble, true charac- 
ter to the church and community in 
which she lived can never be estimat- 
ed. She was Asheville's greatest ben- 
efactress and from the time of her 
coming to this city in 1870, with her 
husband, Dr. L. M. Pease, she has 
labored unceasingly for the cause of 
righteousness. As monuments to the 
greatness and goodness of Dr. and 
Mrs. Pease stand the Normal and Col- 
legiate Institute, Pease Memorial 
School, Livingstone Chapel (colored) 
and Allan Industrial School for col- 
ored girls. 

A leading spirit in the W. C. T. U., 
Mrs Pease was largely instrumental 
in bringing about a passage of a pro- 
hibition bill for Asheville. An im- 
mense audience from friends in every 
station of life, attesting the esteem 
in which she was held, attended the 
funeral services held at Oakland 
Heights Presbyterian church and later 
at Central M. E. Church, South, of 
which she had been a member during 
her residence in the city. A beautiful 
tribute of her life and character was 
given by her pastor, Dr. J. C. Rowe. 

We shall miss her, but feel that the 
example of her life shall ever live 
as a guide in the paths of rectitude 
and truth. 



NEW ORGANIZATIONS 
Adult Societies 

Charlotte District, Dilworth church, 
Charlotte, N. C. President, Mrs. C. 
M. Creswell; 1st vice-president, Mrs. 
Hunter; 2nd vice-president, Miss Ger- 
trude Williamson; 3rd vice-president, 
Mrs. F. L. McGinn; 4th vice-president, 
Mrs. W. F. Bennett; recording secre- 
tary, Mrs. S. C. Tizzer; corresponding 
secretary (home), Mrs. L. R. McCall; 
corresponding secretary (foreign), Mrs. 
E. B. Hardin; treasurer (home), Mrs. 
D. F. Furr; treasurer (foreign), Mrs. 
W. M. D. McCall; treasurer (local), 
Mrs. W. F. Fedfern. Voice Agent, Rev. 
J. O. Ervin. 

Salisbury District, Westford church, 
Concord, N. C. President, Mrs. W. C. 
Houston; 1st vice-president, Mrs. Cle- 
tus Starr; 2nd vice-president, none; 
3rd vice-president, Mrs. C. W. Dabbs; 
4th vice-president, Mrs. P. D. Moody; 
recording secretary, Mrss Margaret 
Russell; corresponding secretary, Mrs. 



W. P. LeGrande; treasurer, Mrs. John 
Reyn Ms. Addresses of all the offi- 
cers, Concord, N. C, R. F. D. 6. 

Salisbury District, Albemarle. A 
home mission department uniting with 
the foreign. President, Mrs. R. G. 
Tuttle; 1st vice-president, Miss Lesca 
Freeman; 2nd vice-president, Mrs. E. 
F. Magruder; 3rd vice-president, Mrs. 
Dan Shankle; 4th vice-president, Mrs. 
John Boyette; corresponding secretary 
and treasurer, Mrs. G. P. Watkins; 
recording secretary and agent for 
Voice, Mrs. W. F. Anderson; super- 
intendent of publicity, Mrs. J. M. 
Brown. 

Young People 

Charlotte District, Matthews. Pres- 
ident, Miss Mae Belk; 1st vice-presi- 
dent, Miss Hallie Hemby; 2nd vice- 
president, Mr. Jesse Cunnup; 3rd vice- 
president, Miss Zuline McAllister; 4th 
vice-president, Mr. Charles Whitting- 
ton; recording secretary, Miss Pauline 
Taylor; corresponding secretary, Mr. 
Joseph Taylor; treasurer, Mr. Clyde 
Belk. 

Juniors 

Asheville district, Tryon. Miss 
Maude Belue and Miss Gussie Dotson, 
Managers . 



LIVES THAT LIVE 

At one of the Northfield Conferences 
a few years ago, an American mission- 
ary to Africa told a story that stirred 
the hearts of every listener. He be- 
gan his work with companions as eag- 
er as himself. One by one they suc- 
cumbed to the terrible climate. Three 
he buried, the others he took to the 
coast and sent home. Then he turned 
back to stand utterly alone in the 
midst of hundreds of thousands of 
men who had never heard the name 
of God. Again and again he tramped 
the blistered plains with his tongue 
iso swollen he could not speak. 
Thirty times he was stricken by fever 
with no one to help him. Lions at- 
tacked him, natives ambushed him; 
he had lived on everything from ants 
to rhinosceroses. And here was his 
conclusion : 

"I know the great joy of walking 
with Jesus Christ in all of this; I 
stand ready at this moment to go 
through it all again for the joy I 
have had in flashing the word Savior 
into the darkness of a great tribe. 
Is it God's will? That makes the 
wilderness a garden; that makes the 
desert glow with the very presence of 
God!" 

At the same conference there was 
another speaker — a fragile, crippled 
girl who had come as the representa- 
tive of a large mission circle. She 
told how the members earned money 
for the work. It did not seem as if 
her weak little hands could do any- 
thing, but she earned her share until 
there came eighteen weeks of terrible 
pain. It was not the suffering, but 
the thought that she could not work 
for the cause so dear to her that troub- 
led her. "Then," she said, "I had 
such a nice thought. Every week they 
brought me flowers from the church, 
and sometimes friends sent me car- 
nations and roses. I rented these 
flowers to the girls who were going 
to parties and put the money in my 
box." The weak voice rang with joy. 
"I made more by being sick than I 
did by being well!" 

We are told sometimes that we live 
in an age of commercialism — that life 
is no longer vivid and eager and full 
of adventure. How then can we ac- 
count for lives like these, which in the 
midst of hardship and suffering find 
fulness of joy? The strong man and 
the crippled girl bear the same mes- 
sage: nothing can make life small 
and poor if we will to make it great; 
no circumstance is powerful enough to 
defeat a soul aflame with the love of 
God. — Selected. 



THE FALLEN DRAGON 

By Rev. James L. Barton 

The old national flag of China, which 
for hundred's of years has flown over 
that great country, wa3 a green, red 
and white dragon upon a yellow back- 
ground, the dragon stretching well 
across the center and engaged in an 
attempt to get at and swallow the 
sun in the upper inside corner. Gen- 
erations of Chinese have lived in mor- 
tal fear that he may sometime suc- 
ceed in accomplishing this nefarious 
purpose. It is to prevent such a de- 
structive and fatal act that the Chinese 
at the time of the eclipse of the sun 
beat tom-toms, drums and anything 
that will create a din and frantically 
shout as they attempt to frighten him 
away. Millions of them believe that 
the disturbance thus created prevented 
hi3 artually getting the sun down, 
although there are many instances 
when he succeeded in taking it en- 
tirely in his mouth. 

While the old dragon was rather 
a mystical personage, sometimes en- 
dangering even the sun, he was also 
supposed to dwell in the earth and 
practically fill it. In spots he came j 
nearer to the surface, while in other I 
places he was more deeply buried; 
but only the necromancers were able 
to locate those spots. He had a fixed 
prejudice against being dug into, and 
if anyone were so thoughtless as to 
dig a well through his skin, the 
chances were that he would become 
terribly angry, and bring sickness or 
death to the guilty person, or his fam- 
ily, or perhaps a pestilence to the vil- 
lage or a drought upon the entire 
neighborhood. 

When I was in the city of Hankow 
a few years ago, the viceroy of the 
province was a man of unusual en- 
terprise and energy, but he believed 
in the dragon, of course. He lived at 
one side of the city while his official 
headquarters were some distance away 
and upon the other side of a high 
hill or ridge. Because of this, he had 
to climb over that hill several times 
a day. One of his enterprising under 
officers suggested to him that he could 
have a road put through the hill on 
the level and so make his trip easier. 
The idea struck him favorably, and 
without consulting the religiously wise 
men he had it done. Not long there- 
after he was afflicted with a sore 
mouth. He called the Chinese medi- 
cal man, who after a careful exami- 
nation and adequate consultation that 
the signs came to the conclusion that 
in having dug the hole through the 
mountain he had disturbed the dragon 
and that there could be no recovery 
until the tunnel mas filled up. The 
viceroy gave orders to close up the 
underground road; his mouth soon 
ceased to be sore, and he contentedly 
climbed up and down the hill more 
convinced than ever that it was a 
dangerous experiment to tamper with 
the repose of the spirit of the earth 
and air. 

It is easy to see why the Chinese 
did not open and work their wonder- 
fully rich coal and iron mines, and 
why they were strongly opposed to 
digging holes for telegraph poles and 
cutting through hills for railroads. 
The old dragon held in his relentless 
grip the leading resources of the coun- 
try, and old China was unable to 
break his hold. He was never friend- 
ly and benevolent, but always waiting 
to avenge some indignity shown to 
himself; and when he set about it, 
in the belief of the Chinese, he could 
make himself most disagreeable and 
even destructive to thousands of lives 
over entire provinces. So long as the 
people really believed this they would 
not do anything that they thought 
liable to bring upon them and their 
country such grave disaster. 

They seemed to have an idea that 
the dragon liked to see his own pic- 
ture; hence it appeared upon the na- 
tional flag and was placed upon the 
postage stamps and coins, embroider- 
ed upon garments and magnificent tap- 



estries, cut into their copper and glaz- 
ed into their china vases. In old 
China the dragon was almost if not 
quite as omnipresent to the view of the 
foreigner as he was in the thought 
of the Chinese themselves. 

For more than one hundred years 
missionaries in China have been 
teaching the people that the world is 
not ruled by a great evil beast from 
within, but by the God of heaven whom 
also their own emperors honor and 
worship. They have opened schools 
in which the modern sciences, includ- 
ing geology and astronomy, have been 
taught to tens of thousands of Chinese 
young men and thousands of young 
women. They have also studied geog- 
raphy and history and have learned, 
what is quite contrary to their old 
belief, that China is not the great 
midde kingdom of all the world, but 
only one of several countries. Many 
of these students have come to Amer- 
ica and Europe for further study in 
the great colleges and universities, 
and are now holding positions of great 
responsibility in the home govern- 
ment; some of them have had much 
to do with the organization of the 
new republic of China. It is not 
strange therefore that when the re- 
public was formed the old dragon flag 
was discarded. It no longer repre- 
sents new China, which has thrown 
away belief in the dragon, and is now 
engaged in removing from everything 
in the country all signs of the old 
hereditary enemy. 

That the Chinese are succeeding in 
effectively casting him down from his 
throne is demonstrated by the open- 
ing of mines in all parts of the coun- 
try and in the building of thousands 
of miles of railways with cuts and 
tunnels, and the setting up of tele- 
graph lines all over China. The old 
beast that paralyzed progress is dead, 
or is rapidly dying, and we see a 
new industrial, intellectual and re- 
ligious China springing into being. 

The new flag has no sign of the 
dragon upon it, but consists of five 
broad equal stripes running length- 
wise. Beginning at the top, the stripes 
are red, yellow, blue, white and black. 
The red represents the Chinese who 
constitute the great bulk of the pop- 
ulation; the yellow, the Manchus, who 
ruled China for nearly three hundred 
years; the blue, the Mongols, who in- 
habit the great plains of Mongolia; 
the white, the Tibetans, who dwell in 
Tibet, but who acknowledge the sov- 
reignty of China; and the black; the 
Mohammedans, who are widely scat- 
tered over the entire country. Every 
man of China — of whatever race- 
as he looks upon the new flag, sees 
nothing to make him tremble with 
fear, but beholds a flag which stands 
for brotherhood, equality and frater- 
nity, and in which there is always a 
stripe peculiarly his own. A belief 
in God as Creator and Ruler of the 
world has made possible a new China 
and has driven the old dragon into 
the innermost caves of the earth, 
from which he can never again emerge 
to paralyze the inhabitants of the 
great republic. — Youth's Companion. 



WHITE ORPINGTON EGGS 

I am now ready to furnisn eggs from 
select Crystal White Orpington stock 
at $2.00 per sitting. Fertility guar- 
anteed- Address 

Mrs. W. S. Hales 
Box 14. Gibsonville, N. C. 



The Newest Styles of Jewelry 



WATCHES, STERLING: SILVER 
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Clock* that will run and a large assort- 
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SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO 

LEADING JEWELERS 



February 5, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Epworth League Department 

Conducted by Miu A. Stanly Hall. Hickory, N. C. 



Most of our mistakes come from 
living for the minute instead of for 
eternity. — Selected. 



Never in the history of time has 
it been the privilege of the world to 
witness such a transformation of a 
nation as that which has taken place 
in China during the last two decades. 
Says Dr. Ross: "Nowadays world pro- 
cesses are telescoped and history is 
made at aviation speed. The exciting 
part of the transformation of China 
will take place in our time. . . . 
The renaissance of a quarter of the 
human family is occuring before our 
eyes. — Selected. 



A WALKING BIBLE 

A missionary in Japan writes as 
follows of one of the Japanese speak- 
ers at some special services: "He is 
literally a walking Bible. He stands 
with the Bible open — it may be up- 
side down or not, for he does not 
see it — and recites it as fluently as 
it he saw every word. The word of 
God flows more naturally from his 
lips than his own words. "We had 
open-air meetings, and his voice soon 
gathered a crowd wherever he stood. I 
O for more such men]"— Missionary 
Voice. 



membership of less than fifty. Just 
watch the Newton League! 



MORMONS IN MISSOURI 

The mormon missionaries are again 
making their house to house visita- 
tion in the Missouri towns, putting 
their literature in the hands of every 
woman and girl who will recieve it. 
While we hope for a time when Mor- 
monism will yield to a pure Christian- 
ity, it is a condition and not a theory 
that confronts our churches. It is 
impossible that all these visits should 
be made and all this literature dis- 
tributed yearly without some results. 
False faiths make their appeal to the 
lonely, the sad and the neglected. Is 
not the presence ot these men a chal- 
lenge to the Christian women of every 
town to make a stronger effort to 
i each all other womea and girl3 in 
service for Christ and the church? — 
Missouri Conference Bulletin. 



NEWTON LEAGUE STUDIES 
AFRICA 

"We had the pleasure of attending 
the missionary meeting of the Newton 
League last Tuesday night. The sub- 
ject was Africa. Miss Olive Duke as 
leader of the meeting gave a short 
sketch of the country, its size and 
its population. This was followed by 
several readings in regard to the mis- 
sion work in Africa and the mission- 
aries which went out last fall to 
open our new mission station in Af- 
rica. Miss Trollinger gave a digest 
of Dr. Morrison's address before our 
Missionary Conference at Waynesville 
last summer, ending with his plea for 
more workers in the field. After this 
Mrs. Knox sang "Here am I, Send 
Me," which was enjoyed very much. 
Several new members were received. 
The songs used were all appropriate 
to the meeting, such as "I'll Go Where 
You Want Me to Go." After the 
meeting the League adjourned to the 
parsonage where they were received 
by Rv. and Mrs. Biles and Miss Duke 
and Mr. Lowery, the president of the 
League. A Bible contest was enjoyed 
very much, though it taxed our minds 
to find the answers to the questions, 
which were found in the Old Testa- 
ment. Dainty refreshments were serv- 
ed. Everyone enjoyed it very much. 
We enjoyed the meeting very much 
and enjoyed meeting the Newton 
Leaguers. We are expecting great 
things of these earnest young people 
and we are not going to expect in 
vain. They have splendid officers and 
good members. There were about 
forty present at this meeting, with a 



TITHE 

We wonder how many of our Leag- 
uers are titters. We know that many 
of our Leaguers are still in school and 
do not have much money of their 
own, but we all have a certain amount 
that is ours to do as we wish with, 
and I wonder how many of us give a 
tenth to the Lord. No matter how 
little we have if we give one-tenth to 
the Lord we will get much more pleas- 
ure out of the other nine-tenths than 
we would have out of all of it. Let 
us try it. Today is a day of giving. 
We have all heard "It is more blessed 
to give than to receive." The more 
we give to the Lord's work, the more 
we will receive from the Lord. One 
man in a prosperous Baptist church 
made this proposition: If any member 
of this church would give one-tenth 
of all his income to the Lord for one 
year and if at the end of the year 
he is not as well off as he has always 
been when he gave very little to the 
church, then I will refund to him 
all that he has given. This was a 
fair proposition. We did not hear of 
'anyone who called for the refund of 
their tithe. 

Tithe, it is the Word's intent, 
Tithe, because of blessings sent; 
Tithe, because you serve the Master; 
Tithe, he needs the money faster. 

— Selected. 



A PARABLE ON TITHING 

Listen to a parable on tithing. I 
have a little box in a safety deposit 
vault, in the box a few savings, in my 
pocket the key. One day I went down 
to the vault. The keeper opened the 
door and walked to the box with me. 
I fell on my knees and began to plead 
with the keeper to open the box. He 
said: "Isn't the key in your pocket?" 
I sprang to my feet, gave him the 
key and he opened the box. 

The church is on its knees before 
God, begging him to open the win- 
dows of heaven and pour out a bless- 
ing. She pleds and the voice of God 
asks: "Isn't the key in your pocket? 
Give it to me and prove me if I will 
not do as I say." — Missionary Voice. 

For years the church has been pray- 
ing for God to open the doors to the 
heathen lands that Christianity might 
enter in. The doors are open. Now 
it is up to us to pay our way into 
them. We cannot expect God to do 
all. We heard this little incident in 
a sermon a few weeks ago. The pas- 
tor said that out in a mission church 
in Ohio he saw these words over the 
pulpit. "Christ alone can save the 
world; but even Christ cannot save 
the world alone." Christ will do His 
part, but we must do ours. Anything 
that is worth having is worth paying 
for. Let us not stop praying for the 
salvation of the world, but let us 
also commence paying for it. 

If all the members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, were tithers 
our Missionary Board would not have 
to plead for more money, and the calls 
from the various mission fields would 
not have to go unanswered. 

There are three ways in which we 
can help the missionary work: give 
our prayers, give our money, give our 
lives. We can all give our prayers; 
we can all give our money, though 
from many of us the gift may be 
small, but if given in the right spirit 
it will accomplish much, but is left 
to only the few to give their lives. 
Can't we make that few more. May 
be there are some of our Western 
North Carolina Leaguers who have 
herd the call to give their lives to 
God's work. If so, will you not an- 
swer the call and say "Here am I; 
send me?" 



oo<xxxxx><x><^ 

^ DID YOU EVER HEAR OF 

8 Tom Watson on Missions? 

JxJ THEN YOU SHOULD READ 

8 TOM WATSON EXPOSED 

By Rev. Carlton D. Harris, of Baltimore 



SS A Complete Refutation Every Charge 
Fully and 
of Watson's Criticisms Frankly Met 



Sixty pages, Ten cents per copy, one dollar per dozen, 
postpaid. Order to-day of 

BOARD OF MISSiOMS 

^ 810 Broadway Nashville, Tenn. ^ 

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TRY THIS FOR YOUR HEALTH 

For diseases which do not readily 
yield to drug treatment, such as chron- 
ic dyspepsia, indigestion, rheumatism, 
BTight's disease, gall stones, uric acid 
poisoning and diseases of the kidney 
and liver, the best physicians send 
their wealthy patients to the famous 
mineral springs- Some even spend 
months at the Spas of Europe and are 
almost invariably cured or greatly 
benefited. 

I believe that the Shivar Spring is 
the greatest mineral spring ever dis- 
covered and I believe it so firmly that 
I offer to send you enough water for 
a three weeks' treatment (two five- 
gallon demijohns) on my guarantee 
that if you do not say that you are 
benefited I wiwll refund the price. 
Lou would hardly believe me if I told 
you that only about two out of a thou- 
sand, on the average, say that they 
have received no benefit. The water 
is curing thousands. It cured me 
when my friends and physicians 
thought that my case was incurable 
and I am willing and anxious for you 
to match your faith in the Spring 
against my pocketbook. If I win you 
become a life friend of the Spring. 
If I lose I will be sorry for you, but 
I will appreciate your courtesy in giv- 
ing the water a trial and will gladly 
refund your money on request. Read 
and sign the following letter: 

Shivar Spring, 

Box 5C, Shelton, S. C. 
Gentlemen : 

I accept your guarantee ober and 
enclose herewith two dollars for ten 
gallons of Shiva Mineral Water- I 
agree to give it a fair rtial, in accord- 
ance with instructions contained in 
booket you will send, ad if the results 
are not satisfactory to me you agree 
to refund the price in full upon re- 
ceipt of the two empty demijohns 
which I agree to return promptly. 

Name 

Address 

Shipping Point 

(Please write distinctly) 

Note: — The advertising manager of 
the N. C. Christian Advocate is per- 
sonally acquainted with Mr. Shivar. 
You run no risk whatever in accept- 
ing his offer. I have personally wit- 
nessed the remarkable curative effects 
of this water in a very serious case. 




Claude Robeson 

ORGAN RECITALS 
New Organs Opened 

Teacher of Organ, Greensboro College 
for Women; Organist and Choirmaster 
West Market St. M. E. Church, Organist 
and Director Temple Emanuel. Address 
Greensboro College, Greensboro, N. C. 



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— — 

Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 5, 1914 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted fcr Walter Thompson, Superintendent 



, < .. .,.,,» ........... f • . . . . . ■ ■ ■ 

WEEKLY REPORT 
Received on Fifth Sunday Collections, 
Week Ending January 31, 1914 

S. JVT. Asbury, Zion S. S., Morgan- 
jjton, $2.64; D. S. Roberts, Biltmore 
S. S., ' Biltmore, $7.50; total, tlO.u: 
Received on Ten Per Cent, Special 

and General Suppotr 

Rev. C. S. Kirkpatrick, Mooresville 
station, $55.65; Rev. J. W. Kennedy, 
Maiden ctt, $18.00; J. S. L. Orr, spe- 
cial support, $10.00; a High. Point 
merchant, general support, $10.00; 
tfrom farm, $2.50;. for phone message, 
25c. Total, $96.40. 

Received on Building Fund, J. H. 
West, Financial Agent 

I ■ w . 

Paid on Subscriptions 

Asheville: Zeb F. Curtis, for Kope 
Elias Lot, $78.29. Hickory: IX. U 5 - 
"Long, $1.00. Total, $79.29; 

New Donations 

Candler: Prof. Greenlee's Senior 
Bible Class, $10.00. Asheville: R. L. 
Thrash, $5.00. Candler: F. M. Park- 
er, $2.50. General collection, Oak 
Hill church, $2.05. Candler: J. C. 
Curtis and wife, $30.00; Mrs. E. S. 
Wolf, $1.00; R. E. Morgan. $1)00. 
Bryson City: S. G. Coble, $1.00. 
Hickory: P. M. Thompson, $2.10. 
Total, $54.65. Grand total, $133^94. 



WHY NOT TODAY 

It was New Year's Day. There had 
been a big storm, and although the 
wind had spent its force, the snow still 
fell steadily. 

"Regular winter weather and no mis- 
take," observed Mr. Richard Hunt, as 
he came in noisily, stamping the snow 
from his boots; "but I like it So cold 
and bracing." 

Mrs. Hunt, who was sitting near an 
open stove, laughed. 

"I like the house best, such a day as 
this, she sad, shivering a little. "I 
don't believe I'd be willing to face the 
cold even for the sake of the bracing." 

"I heard you say you were going to 
see' old Mrs. Heifer today?" L 

"Yes, but I'll have to wait' until 'some 
other day. Poor Mrs. Heifer!'' , :; 

"Is she sick:?" *o 

"Yes." 

"I suppose she's very lonely since her 
daughter died?" 

"Yes." •• 9*H 

~ shouldn't wonder if she has a strug- 
gle to make both ends meet since that 
bank failure?" 

"I don't believe she does make the 
ends meet. I feel very sorry for her. ' 

"But not quite sorry enough for you 
to go and see her as you had intended 
to do today?" teasingly. 

■ "Some other day will do as well — 
will it not?'-' 

"Not if she needs you today. Come, 
get on your wraps and I'll go with 

: Vouv" ■ «w* | 

1 ""Why, Richard Hunt, what's got- in- 
to you? I thought you never liked? to 
^go "calling, especially at such places." 
"You thought right, my dear; but 
can you tell me what there is to pre- 
vent my turning over a new leaf on 
New Year's Day?' 
She laughed. 

''It would be a good idea," she said. 
"Well, then, encourage me in it." 

"SO I Will". _ , ,v - : 

V She arose at once and , was. ; -soon 
ready to face the storm, with a basket 
on her arm. \ '■' , ..j.'i • \ 

"What's in it?" Mr. Hunt asked, <as 
he relieved his wife of the basket. , 

"Sugar and spice, and every thing 
nice," she -quoted. 

A little maid opened the door when 
they reached Mrs. Heifer's. To Mrs. 
Hunt's questions as to how the latter 
was, the child answered:: "She's not 
very well, ma'am," and then lowering 
her voice to a confidential whisper, "I 



guess she'm awful lonesome. She bin 
crying — I saw her." 

The weary, old face brightened when 
little Polly led the cal)eTS?1n, but both 
Mr. and Mrs. Hunt were observant, and 
read "between the lines" -feat the '-dear 
old lady was not only sorrowful, but 
troubled. 

"I wish you a happy New Year," Mrs. 
Hunt said, taking the thin old hands 
in a close clasp. 

"Thank you," responded the old la- 
dy, warmly; "and I wish you both a 
happy New Year." 

"We had a fine turkey, dinner to- 
day," said Mr. Hunt, "and I rather 
think my wife has brought you a 
piece," uncovering the basket. Yes, 
sure enough, here it is!" 

"Now Dick," said his wife, "■''you've 
made your speech; sit down, please." 

He sat down with a sigh, pretending 
to feel hurt. He looked so comical 
that Mrs. Heifer's spirits arose so far 
that she laughed. 

"I am greatly obliged to you both for 
remembering j me," shejsaid. I'm go- 
ing to confess -that I've been longing 
for some turkey for a week, and now 
here it is." f - 

The trio chatted pleasantly for a 
little while, and then Mr. Hunt arose 
suddenly: 

"I've thought of an errand or two," 
he said. "You can have the floor to 
yourselves until I return. I'll not be 
gone long." 

He met the small maid in the hall. 

"Polly," he said, "I don't want to 
pry into Mrs. Heifer's business, but 
I'm real anxious to know of she has 
every thing she needs. She's an old 
friend, you know; does she need any 
thing, oily?" - -s^l ■ 

"Yes, sir, , 'deed Jsheyjdo; but she 
didn't say so. She ain'tono complainer 
— that's what -she aAaZt**. She ain't had 
uo cogee since — since" — > 
when?" 

Go on, Polly, talk fast. Since 
when?" 

"Since her money took wings an' 
flew. I dunno where it flew to, but 
that's what some one said — itflew — 
an' she don't hev butteT no more. I 
wanted to tell the grocer's boy ye 
were out, but Mrs. Heifer she say: 
"No, not now, Polly; sone other time." 

"It doesn't seem hardly warm enough 
in the house, Polly. Do you have plen- 
ty of coal?" , 

"That's whaj ( we don'Lsir," she said 
with decision, We'm jess about out. 
I guess by tomorrow it'll all be gone. 
Miss Heifer's a'most shakin' with cold 
sometimes . She had. two shawls 
around her when you rung the bell, 
but she took 'em off." r, 

Mr. Hunt had heard nougb — quite 
enough. , 

"Poor, dear old soul," he. -said to 
himself, as he went out on his minis- 
tering journey. 

He kept his promise; he was not 
gone long. He put a bunch of bright 
carnations in the old lady's hand, and 
then he said to his wife, smilingly, 
that it was time to "move on." 

Polly let them out of. (.he front door. 
Returning to the room, she found the 
old lady in a rapture of joy. There 
were tears in her eyes, but she was 
smiling. The fragrant, rosy carna- 
tions were still in her hands. On the 
lo.w chair beside her .w^aa; fthexfoasket 
that the Hunts had brought 

''Look, Polly," she crfijefl, da a glee 
that was like a child's. 

And Polly looked and laughed. What 
she saw was a plate of sliced turkey, 
dainty biscuits, a print of butter,, a 
mince pie, a frosted plum cake, oranges, 
grapes, nuts, raisins an&i candy. 

"Oh, my," cried Pollys' what a fine 
New Year we do be^Mwvfin' after all!" 

Presently the grotoerrtgeboy delivered 
a heavily filled basket and a message. 
."Tell yer missus Buck^owers said 



/Methodist Benevolent Association 

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he'd be here tomorrow mornin' at eight 
o'clock, sure." \ -fea|p*jLJ, 
"What for?" 

"What for?" mockingly. Why to 
bring the load 0' coal, of course." 

"Oh! I believe there's fairies aroun' 
— I do so!" and after closing the door 
>on the grocer's boy, Polly felt in- 
clined to stand on her head by way 
of celebrating the delightful new state 
of things. 

She left the basket standing in the 
hall, as it was too heavy for her to 
carry, but she could smell the coffee 
and took that package with her; also 
two or three more. 

"Oh, Miss Heifer, another big bas- 
ket's come, an' it's jes' full of every- 
thing. Here's coffee for you an' tea 
an' sugar. An' tomorrow there's a big 
load o' coal a-comin'." 

"Polly!" 

"Yes, mum." 

"What does it all mean, all that 
great basket of things you're telling 
about and the coal coming tomor- 
row?" 

"I dunno." 

"But who sen the groceries? Who 
is it going to send the coal?" 

Polly looked mystified. She stood 
boring the toe of her old shoe into the 
rug. Suddenly a light broke over her 
face. 

"I guess it's the Lord, ma'am. You 
sed the Lord ud provide — I heard you 
— an' He's done it." 

The old lady folde dher hands. 

"Bless the Lord, O my soul!" she 
said, fervently. 

"I've thought of something, Miss 
Heifer," Polly suddenly broke out ex- 
citedly. "I guess Mr. Richard Hunt's 
a-bin a-helpin' the Lord." 

The old lady smiled. 

"We have the same thoughts about 
it, Polly, you and I," she said. — Mid- 
land Christian Advocate. 



EXCHANGE YOUR SILENT PIANO 
FOR ONE THAT ALL CAN PLAY 

One of the most popular features 
of the N. C. Christian Advocate Piano 
Club is that by which you can ex- 
change your silent piano for a self- 
player piano that every member of 
your family, old and young, can play. 
The self-player is unquestionably the 
greatest musical instrument of the 
age, for it opens wide the door to the 
entire world of musical composition. 

The Reverend Len G. Broughton, 
D. D., formerly of Atlanta, now pastor 
of the celebrated Christ church, Lon- 
don, writing to the managers of the 
Club, says: — "We have one of your 
Parrand Cecilian Player Pianos, and 
are most delighted with it. All who 
have ever heard it are in an agree- 
ment that it is one of the very , best 
combinations that has ever been put 
on the market. Persons desiring such 
an instrument will certainly do well 
to examine yours, and if they will 
only give it a trial, I feel sure that 
they will try no further. Fraternally 
yours, Len G. Broughton." 

Write for your copy of the beau- 
tifully illustrated Club catalogue and 
see how easy it will be for you to 
secure a spendid piano-.or, player piano 
for your home. Address the Mana- 
gers, Ludden and Bates, N. C. Chris- 
tian Advocate Piano Club Dept., At- 
lanta, Ga. 



PREFERS A HORSE 

Mrs. Flynn — "They do be after say- 
in's thot old mon Killy has got loco- 
mother ataxy." 

Mr. Flynn — "We'll, he's got the mon- 
ey to run wan av thim if he wants ter, 
but fer m ypar-rt, I'd rayther have a 
good harse anny day." — Judge. 



THIS SPACE BELONGS TO 

ROOT. W.MURRAY 

GENE RAL 

Insurance 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

208 1-2 Soutk Elm gfc| 
ICS 



$ 



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Improvements 

for 1914 

In our Munger System 
Outfits give the ginner 
the big thing he is looking 
for — increased output with 
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The high quality of sample, 
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cotton growers as well as 
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Write nearest Continental Sales 
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tONTSNENTAD 

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r? 



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JMLLAS,TEX.,MEMPHIS,TENN U 
IKLOTTE.NXL, 



Pecan Trees Get Money 
From the Fence Corners 

Usually our trees begin to bear 
when five years old; at ten years 
they will produce about 30 pounds 
of nuts which will sell for 50 cents 
a pound. The crop increases every 
year, and trees that produce 200 
pounds or more are very common. 
For general planting we advise 
Schley and Stuart, the two all- 
round Pecans. 

Special Spring Price: 2 to 3 ft., 75 cts. 
each; 3 to 4 ft., $1 each; 4 to 5 ft., 
$1.25 each. Lower rate for larger lots. 

Send for our catalogue of Pecan and 
other Nut Trees. Fruits, Ornamentals, 
Shrubs and Roses. Let us help you get 
extra money from the corners of 
your farm. 

HOWARD NURSERY CO., Box 215 Stovall. N.C. 



February 5, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 



Married 



On Friday night, January, 23, at 
the residence of Rev. J. W. Jones, in 
Mooresville, Mr. Carl Walter and Miss 
Henrietta Chester, Rev. J. W. Jones 
officiating. 

#. * * * 
At the home of the bride's parents, 
Captain and Mrs- Joseph Parkin, Trin- 
ity, N. C, on January 21st, Miss Me- 
lita Parkin to Mr. Edgar Fletcher Pep- 
per, of Thomasville, Rev. A. S. Raper, 
the pastor, officiating. 

* * * * 

On Wednesday, January 7, 1914, at 
the parsonage on Fines Creek, Miss 
Miss La Unie Russell and Mr. Loyd 
Messer, Rev. J. A. Marr officiating. 
* * • * * 

At the home of the bride's father 
in Taylorsville, on December 24, 1913, 
Beecher Johnson and Ollie Fortner 
were married, Rev. W. V. Honeycutt 
officiating. 

* * * * 

By the same, on January 1, 1914, 
Jay Lackey and Vera Sharp were mar- 
ried at the home of the bride's father, 
Mr. Wm. Sharp, of Sharp's township, 
in Alexander county. 

* * * * 

By the same, on January 21, 1914, 
M. R. Patterson and Lois Payne were 
married at the home of the bride's 
father, Mr. N. P. Payne. 




RIPPLE — Webster Lee Ripple was 
born December 19, 1894, and died 
January 1, 1914, being 19 years and 
13 days old. He was a son of Mr. 
J & C- Ripple. He professed religion 
in Jesus and joined the church at Mt. 
Olivet in August 1904. He was a 
young man of promise and was in 
school at Yadkin College. He had 
just spent the Christmas time with 
his home folks and just before return- 
ing came to his death in a very sad 
way indeed- Burial services were 
held in the church of which he was a 
member in the presence of hundreds 
of people, after which we laid his 
mortal remains away in the Mt. Olivet 
cemetery to await the resurrection 
morn. His parents and brothers and 
sisters and the many friends sorrow- 
fully mourn his loss. May God's grace 
be realized in this time of sore be- 
reavemment to comfort and cheer and 
at last may be permitted to meet 
sometime, somewhere to live together 
forever where no sorrow is felt, but 
bliss eternal. Sincerely, 

D. S. Richardson, Pastor. 



HANES — Susan Hanes was born 
January 6, 1841, and died January 
14, 1914, aged 73 years and 8 days. 
She was married to Jonathan Hanes 
while young- He preceded her to the 
eternal world 14 years. There was 
born to this union five children of 
whom four are living. There are 
eighteen grandchildren. Sister Hanes 
professed religion and joined the M. 
P. church in 1869 and connected her- 
self with Mt. Olivet M. E. Church, 
South, in 1875 and continued a faith- 
ful member of the same to the day 
of her death. She died in Christ a 
triumphant death. Her children and 
friends are left to mourn her loss. 
The funeral services were held in Mt. 
Olivet church, Davidson county, after 
which her mortal remains were laid 
away to await the trumpet call that 
shall awake the dead. May the giver 
of all good bless and comfort the be- 
reaved ones Sincerely, 

D. S. Richardson, Pastor. 




I ' lllili lllill 





GONE HOME 

Mrs. Pearl Atkinson Reece departed 
this life last Friday evening, the 9th 



Bridge ihe gulf wim 

ROYSTER'S 

FERTI LIZERS 

TRADE MARK 



Marvu rtaVo crossed, on litis brieve from poor lands 
and poor crops io succgss arid mdcpGndencG. 
Will rjoujoin tiierr number ? 



F.S.Roxjsier Gviarvo Co. 
Norfolk. Va.. 

Sold cVeryvvkere 



inst. She was in the prime of life, 
having attained the age of only 34 
years and eight months. 

Miss Pearl Atkinson was happily 
married to Mr. Dallas Reece on Christ- 
mas day, 1901, in the Methodist church 
at Siloam, where on yesterday her 
lifeless body reposed in a beautiful 
casket, while her funeral was preach- 
ed by Rev. J. G. W- Holloway, assisted 
by Rev. E. W. Turner. Professor J. 
H. Allen, one of her former teachers, 
also addressed the large audience of 
relatives and sympathizing friends in 
an appropriate and encouraging talk. 

Besides her husband and Ave little 
children, Mrs. Reece leaves to mourn 
her untimely death, father and moth- 
er, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Atkinson; three 
brothers, Mr. Jasper Atkinson, of El- 
kin, and Masters Kemp and Hugh; 
also two sisters, Mrs- W. G. Miller, 
of Spartanburg, S. C, and MDs. M. F. 
Butner, of Pinnacle, and an aged 
grandmother, Mrs. Hallie Ashburn, 
who resides with her mother, Mrs. 
S- J. Atkinson. 

I have known the deceased since 
her childhood. She was always an 
unusually interesting girl. She de- 
tested sham, deceit, hypocrisy in what- 
ever form presented, and was herself 
the very soul of honor and honest 
purpose. She was modest and reserved 
without being prudish; independent 
in thought and speech, without a trace 
of being masculine. As a pupil in 
school at Siloam Academy and in Sun- 
day school, I soon learned to admire 
her high ideals of life. She was a 
model pupil, a diligent student pos- 
sessed of talents above the ordinary 
which she rapidly developed. She 
professed religion in early life, joined 
the Methodist church at Siloam and 
remained a faithful member thereof 
until God called her higher. 

We extend our sympathies to her 
bereaved husband and children, fath- 



er and mother, brothers and sisters, 
for the loss is indeed a great one, 
not only to them but to the entire 
community; but she has gone home. 

W. M. Cundiff. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, our Heavenly Father in 
His infinite wisdom has seen fit to 
remove from our midst our friend and 
co-worker, Mr. Abner Julius Payne; 

Resolved: That we offer the fol- 
lowing resolutions as an expression 
of our love and esteem: 

First, that we, the members of the 
First Methodist Sunday school, Hick- 
ory, N. C-, bow in humble submission 
to God's will. 

Second, that he was faithful and 
true to every trust. 

Third, the announcement of his de- 
parture brings sadness to our hearts. 
We extend to the bereaved relatives 
our tenderest sympathy. 

Fourth, that a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to the family, that 
they be spread upon the permanent 
record of our Sundy school, sent to 
each of our town papers, and to the 
North Carolina Christian Advocate. 

R. L. Clinton, 
W. C- Thompson, 
W. A. Rudasill, 

Committee. 

ROGERS — William Lusk Rogers, 
son of Matthew and Elizabeth Rogers, 
was born July 12, 1829, and died Nov. 
8, 1913, being 84 years, 3 months and 
26 days old. He professed Christ to 
the saving of his soul in 1853 at home 
and was happy in his Christian ex- 
perience till the day of his death. He 
early felt called to preach and during 
the Civil War was licensed to preach 
in the Methodist Protestant church, 
serving various charges in this church 
till 1885. His church having almost 
ceased in this section he made appli- 



cation to the M. E. Church, South, 
and was licensed to preach by the 
District Conference over which Dr. 
J. H- Weaver was presiding. He sus- 
tained the relation of a local preacher 
until he died. He never had charge 
of any work, but preached when op- 
portunity offered. 

He leaves the aged widow, Aunt 
Mary Ann, and the following children, 
the youngest being more than 40 
years, to mourn their loss: Laura, Wm. 
M., D. P., T. N., Mary A. and Sarah J. 

He also leaves three brothers, Mack, 
Newton and H. M. Rogers, who are 
all ripe in years and worthy in the 
church and community and many rel- 
atives, among whom is Honorable S. 
L. Rogers, a nephew. 

Uncle William, as he was familiarly 
known, will be missed in his commun- 
ity and church in which he was al- 
ways deeply interested- He was al- 
ways in his seat at church and es- 
teemed fully the privilege of being "a 
child of the King." 

May our loving heaveny Father com- 
fort the bereaved family. 

His Pastor, 

Crabtree, N. C. J. A. Marr. 



wrHILDS' giant summer cosmos 

is positively the most superb 
ana beautiful garden flower 
known. Blooms profusely from 
June to N6v., each plant pro- 
ducing thousands of flowers, 
larger and more exquisite than 
the fall Cosmos, white, blush, 
pink. rose, crimson.etc. Thrives 
anywhere — finest cut flower for 
vases, etc. Mailed for 
IO cts. per pkt., In- 

eluding 5 other leading 
Novelties free /or trial, viz.: 
Crerto Plnlt, largest and 
finest of all Asters. 
Pansy, Orchid-fld., superb new 

orchid colors. 
Primrose, New Giant White. 
Petunia. Brilliant Beauty. 
Snowball Tomato, new (white). 

All that Six leading Seed bellies for only IO cts., 
together with Notes on Culture. Catalogue. Fl"«l Hints. etc. 

Our me Catalofrue of Flower and Veg. Seeds. Mb* 
Plants and rare new Fruits free to all who apply- W« are tne 
large" gro^wers in the world of Gladiolus. Cannas, Dahl.as, Ul.es. 
Iris. etc.. and our stocks are best and cheapest. 

JOHN LEWIS CHILDS. Floral Park, N. Y. 




Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 5, 1914 



The Sunday School 
Lesson 



FIRST QUARTER— LESSON VI— 
FEBRUARY 8, 1914 



Darkness and Light. Luke 11:14 ; 26; 
33-36 



Golden Text — Look therefore wheth- 
er the light that is in thee be not 
darkness. Luke 11:35. 



The Powerful Healer 

Bishop Talbot, in his graphic and 
interesting volume, My People of the 
Plains, gives an Indian medicine man's 
account of how he come to his pro- 
fession. According to the medicine 
man's story he was leit an orphan 
and traveled into a wide plain that 
he ; might be alone and bemoan his 
fate. He wept and wailed. Looking 
up he saw an eagle and a bear and 
a badger beside him. He told them 
his story. They made him a medi- 
cine man. The eagle gave him one 
of his talons, and with it the know- 
ledge of all above the earth. The 
bear gave him a claw, bestowing 
knowledge of all the earth. The bad- 
ger gave him a claw, with knowledge 
of all under the earth. "Here they 
are," said. Wolf Foot, pointing to three 
claws hanging around his neck. 

The annals of superstition are full 
of such picturesque and yet grotesque 
stories as this. There is plenty of 
marvel, but no moral meaning. There 
is plenty of magic, but no intellectual 
force. To preserve the supernatural 
without its moral and intellectual 
content is superstition. To preserve 
the supernatural, completely filled with 
moral and intellectual meaning, is the 
mark of rational religion. 

The miracles of Jesus do not sug- 
gest the magician or the sorcerer. 
They are of a moral quality which 
places them forever apart. But they 
do not preserve that soul of marvel, 
that fresh wonder of the world, which 
keeps us feeling that life is not a 
closed system, without room for free- 
dom or initiative. They preserve the 
sense that God is mightier than His 
world, and that things cannot happen 
outside the mere running along of a 
mechanical schedule. Christianity pre- 
serves the sense of wonder in an ethicl 
and orderly universe. This is one of 
its greatest achievements. 

Jesus moved about among men, 
constantly bringing hope where there 
had been hopelessness and gladness 
where there had been despair. Deeds 
of loving power were the constant 
commentary on His words. He found 
men dumb and left them speaking. 
He found men blind and left them 
seeing. He found them paralyzed and 
left them walking. He even found 
men dead and left them living. All 
the dark and desperate forces of life 
relinquished their hold at His bid- 
ding. Health conquered disease; life 
conquered death. 

Misinterpreting Good Deeds 

The man who will misinterpret a 
good deed is one of the most danger- 
ous men in all the world. The assail- 
ing of motives is the deadliest weapon 
for the attacking of men. If you can- 
not plausibly attack a reform, then 
proceed to attack the reformer. 

When men could no longer assail 
the work of Jesus they attacked His 
character. He posed as a messenger 
from God. He was really an emissary 
from the devil. 

It was a specious and astute argu- 
ment to offer to a superstitious people, 
but it had one weak point, and 
this Jesus was quick to point out. 
Why was the devil using his energies 
to do the work of God? What evil 
could be brought out of doing good 
on so large a scale? If the words 
and life and work of Jesus were all 
the work of the devil, the devil must 
have turned into a loving and right- 




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AGENTS WANTED. WRITE FOR TERMS TODAY BEFORE TERRITORY YOU WANT IS TAKEN. 

GREENSBORO NURSERIES, John A. Young & Sons, Owners, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Illllllllllllllll! 



eous God. The greatest attack on evil 
the age knew could not come from 
the prince of evil! 

There was only one true way to 
interpret the overthrow of evil. That 
was by the superior power of good. 
There was only one way adequately 
to interpret the casting out of demons 
and the restoring of the moral sanity 
and physical well being of men. That 
was through the power or the holy 
God. 

There is such a thing as amiable 
and almost admirable superstition like 
that of Cervante's Don Quixote. There 
is such a thing as cruel and malig- 
nant superstition. Today it keeps men 
cowering in fear of demons in Korea. 
It is a blight in the life of China. 
It has placed its heavy hand on the 
joy and goodness and brotherhood of 
the race in every age. Heathenism 
has perpetually cowed in the shadow 
of its own fears. It has created de- 
mons in the image of its own imagi- 
nation and has lived in terror of them 
perpetually. In the ascribing of His 
influence to an evil source supersti- 
tion gathered its energies to make its 
most deadly attack on Jesus. The 
hiss of the serpent was in its voice 
and a, terrib poison was ready to 
do its . work, but the attack failed. 
Such transparent goodness was its 
own defense, and superstition fell 
back helpless at last, defeated by the 
character of Him it sought to defame. 

Eyes of Darkness 

In the introductory section of "The 
Ring and the Book" Browning has a 
couple of suggestive and thought-pro- 
voking lines regarding 
"The instinctive theorizing whence a 
fact 

Looks to the eye as the eye likes the 
look." 

Because a man has sight it does 
not follow that he has insight. In- 
deed the eye may be an instrument of 
deception instead of a means by which 
things are seen as they are. What a 
man sees depends not merely on the 
light and darkness in the world, but 
also and very emphatically on the 
light or darkness in his eye. There 
are such things as eyes of darkness, 
which see everything black. 

Jesus felt that the men who referred 
His good deeds to power from the 
devil had eyes of darkness. It was a 
more dreadful thing than the tragedy 
of blind eyes. It was the tragedy of 
eyes of men so constituted that they 
saw evil" when there was no evil and 
read terrible and unholy meanings in- 
to things which were good and true. 

There are a good many kinds of 
eyes of darkness. Some have a se- 
cret of cynicism which reads unlovely 
significance into the most beautiful 
relationships. Some have a secret of 
scorn which burns away the beauty 



from many a noble experience. Some 
have a secret of bitterness which colors 
all the world with its cold blight. 
Some have a secret of brutishness 
which always translates the highest 
into the terms of the lewest and re- 
duces the experiences of the soul to 
the plane of the sensations of the 
body. Some have a secret of hatred 
which takes the bloom from every- 
thing upon which it looks. Some 
have a secret of calculation which can 
put a price upon anything, but has 
no true sense of values . When a man's 
eyes see black, he would make the 
best sort of a world seem a very bad 
one. Such a man often wants to 
change the world. It is really very 
much more important to| have a 
change in his eyes. 

Eyes of Light 

There is a story of a man whose 
eyes were opened so that he saw things 
as they are. He gave one wild look 
about and so horrible were the sights 
he saw that he desperately prayed for 
blindness. Now there is evil enough 
in the world, black and blighting. T 
think it was John Ruskin who once 
said that the cruelest man living 
would put on sackcloth and ashes if 
he really faced the suffering in the 
world. Such a statement brings us 
face to face with facts we must not 
ignore. But while this is true it is 
not all the truth. While there is so 
much evil in the world that we could 
not go over it all if we spent all our 
time thinking of it, it is also true 
that there is so much good in the 
world that if we spent all our time 
appreciating it we would not be able 
to think of it all. In such a world 
it is well to become experts in the 
discoevry of goodness. It is especial- 
ly important not to have the kind or 
eyes which call good evil. 

The eyes of light have an instinct 
for goodness because of the goodness 
within. Jacob Riis tells in one of his 
books of such a sudden revelation of 
self-sacrifice and love of goodness in 
a den of evil in New York that he 
went out under the stars and thanked 
God that he was alive. Another man 
might not have found what Jacob Riis 
found there. He had eyes of light. 

Donald Lowrie, in that powerful 
portrayal and searching analysis of 
the life of a penitentiary, My Life in 
Prison, not only brings us fact to face 
with much that is appalling and ter- 
rible, but again and again makes us 
feel the flashing forth of nobility, the 
power of self-teacrifice and th ecare for 
goodness in men with moral tragedies 
back of them. Eyes of light have been 
able to find many flowers blooming 
even in prisons. 

Of course the eyes of light are not 
the eyes of men easily deluded and 
deceived. The instinct tor goodness is 



not the instinct of a man ready to 
be made a victim by the first clever 
swindler. It is possible to combine a 
keenness like that of a criminal de- 
tective with a sympathy and under- 
standing of the very germs of good- 
ness, like that of the Man of Galilee. 
Eyes of light are all the time finding 
new good things to appreciate, new 
noble deeds to admire and new quali- 
ties in hard-pressed men and women 
which make them worthy of devotion. 
With so many eyes of darkness about 
Him Jesus doubly prized the eyes of 
light which divined His purpose and 
felt His tenderness and responded to 
His love. — New York Christian Advo 
cate. 



AS IT IS TODAY 

Do you know the Youth's Companion 
as it is today — enlarged, improved, 
broadened in its reach of human in- 
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144 Berkeley St., Boston, Mass- 



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February 5, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 




TILLIE'S TENTH 

"I believe I'll speak to her, Abbie." 

"I wish you would." 

The two girls lingered just inside 
the court-house door. They were a bit 
timid about speaking to the club or- 
ganizer in the presence of others. As 
the lady came near, on her way out, 
the younger girl pulled at her sister's 
sleeve. 

"Speak to her now, Tillie." 

"Miss Masten." Her voice was trem- 
ulous, and the young face flushed. 

"Yes. What is it, dear?" Miss 
Masten held out her hand and smiled 
pleasantly. 

"I — we — me and my sister wanted 
to ask you a few questions." 

"Certainly. And this is your sis- 
ter?" 

The three stood alone near the stair- 
way leading down from tne large 
court-room where the Farmer's Insti- 
tute had been held. Tillie' s courage 
grew. "We didn't know whether to 
join the club or not till we talked to 
you. You see father, he's been dead 
'most two years, and there's just ma 
and Abbie and me and the little girls." 

"Yes?" The lady's voice was very 
sympathetic. "But couldn't you hire 
some man to plow the ground? It 
wouldn't take long." 

"Maybe so. We haven't got much 
land, and most o' that's in orchard. We 
live up on the Brushies, and the folks 
make more money off o' apples than 
anything else, but we'd like to try 
raisin' tomatoes, so's we could make 
something for ourselves." 

"That's all right. Just get your 
mother to have your tenth of an acre 
measured off — almost any man can do 
that for you — hire it plowed, and you 
girls can do the rest. Of course you 
could get 'someone to split your stakes. 
You both look strong. I'm sure you 
can do everything except the heaviest 
work. Give me your names and go 
right ahead. I'll be back in time to 
have a canning party, and show all my 
girls how the work is done." 

Her brisk, cheerful air gave the sis- 
ters confidence, and their names were 
enrolled. The four-mile walk home 
failed to dampen their ardor, but they 
found their mother skeptical. 

"It looks to me like there ain't much 
in it, Tillie. You know how hard it is 
to git the little truck-patche's plowed. 
The men that's any account at all are 
so busy with their own work, an' be- 
sides there ain't no money to hire with. 
Spring's a pow'ful hard, skeerce time." 

"I reckon we can borrow ol' Kit and 
plow that much ourselves." 

The mother laughed. "I have seen 
one woman plowin,' but that was Bet- 
sie Bowman, an' she's as big as you 
two children put together, an' just like 
a man anyway." 

"You get somebody to measure off 
our land down there below the orchard 
next to the branch, and we'll see what 
we can do," announced fifteen-year-old 
Tillie. 

After some insistence their mother 
agreed to ask a neighbor's services in 
allotting the tenth acre allowed by the 
rules of the girls' clubs. When Tillie 
asked the man if he could do the plow- 
ing for them, he did not take them se- 
riously. 

"Shucks! That's all foolishness a- 
talkin' about you little gals raisin' to- 
matoes to sell. Why, you can't hardly 
give away tomatoes in town. Every- 
body's got their own garden an' truck- 
patches." 

The girl's discussed the matter thor- 
oughly and decided they would not ask 
anyone else, but would borrow old Kit, 
a mule which had been in the family 
for years, and had been sold to a neigh- 
bor after the father's death. 

They bided their time, and one morn- 
ing, when their mother and the two 
little girls had gone to spend the day 
with a friend, Tillie and Abbie hurried 
over to get Kit. 

"What on the topside o' the green 



earth do you 'low to do with that 
mule?" asked Mrs. McNab. "Joe went 
to town with a load o' apples today an' 
iiad to hitch Bill Carter's mule with 
Buck. Kit's plumb contrary. Joe said 
he'd promised you little gals to let you 
have her some day, but I'm 'most 
af eared to see you go off with her; she 
don't kick to be sure, but she just 
stands still in her tracks an' all the 
whippin' you could give her won't 
make her lift a foot till she is good an' 
ready. Ain't you afeared of her?" 

'Af eared of Kit? Why, we've been 
ridin' her ever since we was knee-high 
to a duck." Tillie climbed up and seat- 
er herself on the mule with nothing 
beneath her but an old blanket. "Get 
on behind, Abbie, she's all right." 

"Laws a massey, children! Does 
your ma know you are gettin' Kit to- 
day?" called the neighbor as the girls 
started off at a brisk pace. 

"She knows we mean to get her 
some day, but we didn't want anybody 
to see us," Tillie laughed back at her. 
Kit behaved beautifully on the way 
home. She was gentleness itself while 
the girls dismounted and led her to the 
unused stable in which they found a 
plow and the necessary gear. 

'"Tis a wonder mother hasn't sold 
these things," remarked Abbie. "Looks 
like she's sold about everything we 
could do without since pa died." 

"Reckon you can hitch up?" 

"I'll try. Hold this while I lead 
Kit." The mule looked askance at the 
plow. She flapped her ears wildly and 
refused to get close to the object at 
which she gazed as if lost in wonder- 
ment. "Pshaw! you're pretending," 
laughed Abbie. "Come on, now, and 
be good, Kit. It's the same old plow 
you've pulled all your life." 

The girls coaxed and scolded to no 
purpose. 

"Let me hit her," suggested Tillie. 

"Better not. You never know when 
a mule's going to kick." 

Tillie dropped the plow-gear, seized 
a good-sized stick, and struck Kit a 
vigorous glow on the uank, taking care 
to keep out of range of her heels. Kit 
turned a meek face toward the girl, 
but stood her ground. Tillie grew 
bold and laid it on with all her 
strength. The mule turned a reproach- 
ful look on her, shook herself, and 
calmly *val£w! to the stable door. 

"Maybe she's hungry. Le's give her 
something." 

"Corn? There's not an ear on the 
place," answered Tillie. 

"Yes, mother's got some seed-corn 
put away. Must I get that — just one 
ear?" 

Tillie considlered. "I reckon we'd 
better not, without asking her. Kit, 
Kit, what makes you do so?" 

The girls looked at each other, then 
at the mule, and laughed. 

"It's a fix we're in, Abbie." 

"That's rikht." And again they 
laughed till the hillside threw back the 
echoes. 

""I don't want to give it up. Let's 
try her once more." Abbie gave the 
mule a blow and sprang to one side 
with an excited "whoa!" 

"What you talking about, little 
goose? She's been whoaing too much 
already." 

Abbie looked 'sheepish. "I thought 
she had started to kick." 

"Kick? You're dreamin,' honey. 
Kit's fast asleep." 

A whistle, keen and clear, cut the 
drowsy quiet of the place. 

"Good luck, Abbie; that's Nub 
Hutchins. I'd know his whistle any- 
where. He gets what he calls a dou- 
ble-shuffle on that 'Sweet Bye and Bye' 
chorus. I do hope he's coming this 
way." 

The girls waited while the notes 
sounded louder and more piercingly 
sweet. 

"Reckon he's out huntin.' When he 
gets a little closer we'll call him. 
Nub! O Nub!" 



"You're enough to scare the squir- 
rels, Abbie. I didn't know you had 
such a voice." 

"I want that boy bad. Nub Hutc- 
ins, where are you?" 

The whistling ceased, and a cheer- 
ful call came in answer to Abbie. In 
a few moments the boy was crashing 
through the wooded hillsjde beyond 
the little stream. 

"What's the matter?" Nub rested 
his gun while he surveyed the sur- 
roundings. 

"I was callin' you," said Abbie. "See 
Kit there?" 

"I see Kit there." 

"We want to hitch her to that plow." 

"I don't object. Go ahead." 

"But she won't be hitched." 

"That's it, is it? You scare me out 
o' one year's growth just to get me to 
hitch a mule." Nub looked reproach- 
fully at the girls. 

"O pshaw! Come on, and see if 
you can get her to move. She pre- 
tends to be asleep." Tillie began 
clanking the chains. 
Nub laid down his gun and came to 
the rescue. He pulled and coaxed, then 
stormed and threatened, but Kit stood 
her ground in monumental calm. 

Nub considered. "How'd it do for 
me to strike a match and stick it to 
her tail? I bet she'd move then." 

"She'd move you," replied Tillie. 
"She's no hand to kick, but you'd bet- 
ter not risk that." 

"Tried givin' her fodder or any- 
thing?" 

"No fodder on the place. Mother's 
got some seed-corn, but I didn't like to 
use it." 

"How much?" 

"She bought a half-bushel." 

"Shucks! That's enough to plant a 
big plantation. Bring me the smallest 
ear." 

Tillie hurried in the house and re- 
turned with the corn. Nub held it en- 
ticingly near Kit's nose. The mule 
slowly roused from her lethargy and 
looked at the boy. 

"Come on out o' there." Nub back- 
ed away from the Stable with the 
corn still held out. Kit followed, and 
soon stood chewing while the young 
folks hitched her with no further de- 
mur on her part. Meantime Tillie was 
explaining to Nub and pointing out the 
plot of ground to be plowed. 

"That sounds interestin.' I heard 
the woman a-talkin,' but it looks to 
me like you'd have to work twice that 
much land. One of you couldn't get a 
prize if you both worked the same 
tenth, or do you want a prize? You 
know they are goin' to give one at the 
State Fair." 

"I hadn't thought much about that. 
We live so far away, but we want to 
do our best. Why couldn't we meas- 
ure off twice as much land? Half of it 
on this side of the branch, an' half on 
that." 

"Mighty good place, if it happens to 
be a dry Season. But if its wet, I'm 
afraid a heap of 'em would rot." 

"I picked out that place because 
it's powerful rich. Say, Nub, why 
don't you join the corn club? I heard 
they organized a club at Boomer." 

"Pa's been a-tryin' to get me to join, 
but it's hard work and too much wor- 
ry. I'd rather hunt," Nub laughed 
lazily. 

"You ought to be ashamed o' your- 
self." Tillie spoke from the height of 
her six months' seniority in age. "You 
could be the smartest boy in school 
if you'd only try, but you fool about 
and laugh when the others get ahead 
of you. And hunt! No telling how 
much time you waste in these woods. 
Your pa's got some good corn land. 
They tell me the Yadkin bottoms raise 
some of the finest corn in the state. 
I'd try. But this ain't plowing my 
tenth." Tillie seized the lines and got 
between the plow handles. 

Nub interposed: "You don't mean to 
say that you're goin' to do this work?" 

"I certainly am." 

The boy gave her a gentle push. "Get 
away, and I'll do it. You're a girl, an' 
besides, you ain't strong enough." 

He took the lines and adjusted the 
plow. '^Show me where to begin. 

Tillie laughed . "I don't think you'll 



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Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 5, 1914 



• Tillie laughed. "I don't think you'll 

"Sure enough," and Abbie joined her 
sister's laugher. 

Nub chucked and whistled, stormed 
and pleaded through every note of the 
octavo, jerked, whipped, threw clods at 
every supposedly tender part of the 
mule's anatomy, but failed to rouse Kit 
from her comatose condition. 

Finally he threw the lines down in 
high disgust. 

"Let the old thing alone. I'll tell you 
what I'll do, Tillie. Pa's nearly done 
plowing his corn land. I did help 'im 
yesterday, an' soon as we can spare 
our horses I'll come over and plow for 
you." 

"That's mighty good in you, Nub, but 
I don't want to bother your pa, an' I 
don't like for Kit to outdo me. Here, 
suppose we try this plan. Let me hold 
the plow and you get on Kit's back and 
ride her. She'll go all right when 
you're on her. She was always fine for 
ridin.' " 

In a moment Nub was mounted, 
Tillie between the plow-handles, and 
Abbie standing near with a smile just 
ready to break into one of her merry 
laughs. The plan worked admirably. 
If it hesitated, Nub's energetic kicks 
stirred her to a solemn promenade up 
and down the crooked furrows that Til- 
lie ha.d to plow over and over in order 
to get the soil well loosened. After 
the original tenth was finished, the} 
measured another, and soon had it 
plowed. Many a cheery joke was pass- 
ed during the work, and the woods 
rang with their fresh laughter. 

When Nub climbed down from Kit's 
back, he sobered his face and looked 
at Tillie. "You girls have made me 
plum ashamed of myself. I'm goin' to 
join that Boomer Corn Club, an' here's 
hopin' we'll all three come out on top, ' 
said he. 

It was a busy, happy summer for the 
girls. As it chanced the season was 
dry, and the little valley, with its un- 
failing moisture, proved to be just what 
the plants needed. Patiently, industri- 
ously the girls tended their plot and 
were rewarded by a fine yield. 

When the canning party was held in 
the middle of the district, Tillie led 
the girls in the number of cans filled 
on that occasion. 

"Do your best, Tillie," said Miss 
Masten, when the day's work was end- 
ed. "Don't waste a single tomato. I 
believe you have a fighting chance for 
the prize." 

The girl's energy needed no further 
stimulus, and she went about her work 
with a brave spirit. When the last can 
was sealed, she gave a great sigh of 
satisfaction: "One thousand two hun- 
dred and forty-one cans. Surely toma- 
toes never did grow so before, moth- 
er." 

"It's a plum sight, Tillie, to see what 
you girls have done on them little strips 
of ground. Seems like you'll have to 
build a house to put 'em in. I can't 
turn aroun' hardly without bumpin' 
against 'em." 

It was the last day of the Fair in 
the far away capital. Back in the lit- 
tle mountain home *he two girls wer*> 
in in a flutter of excitement. 

"Of course we can't hear till tomor- 
row, Tillie, but I just can't help think- 
in' maybe they're decidin' right now." 
Abbie paused in front of a mammoth 
stack of cans, and was looking at them 
with loving eyes. 

"Same way with me. If we lived 
close to town we might get a telegram, 
but Miss Masten will let us know as 
soon as she can. She said something 
about a special-delivery letter, but it 
seems like I just can't wait. I don't 
reckon I'll sleep a wink tonight." Til- 
lie walked to the front door and look- 
ed longingly down the road that led 
to the outer world. 

"O Abbie, come here! I see Nub 
coming. I feel it in my bones that 
he's got news for us." 

Nub tried to look unconcerned as he 
came nearer. 

"Don't you go to teasin', Nub Hutch- 
ins," Tillie spoke a little sharply. 
"You've got Something to tell me, and 
I want you to tell it." 

"Sure! Whiat'll you give me for all 
my news. The Boomer Corn Club 



sent a stalk 6*~corn that had ten good 
ears on it, and your uncle Nub is the 
man that made that stalk. Of course 
the prize I got wasn't much, but I'm 
goin' to begin in time and try for the 
big-yield prize. You see I'll have to 
work all winter for that, so it's good- 
bye to my gun — part of the time, any- 
way." 

"I'm mighty glad, Nub. How'd you 
hear?" 

"Long-distance phone to the boys at 
Boomer. I'm right from there." 

"Won't you sit down? I forgot to 
ask you." Tillie's laugh was a weak 
one. "I couldn't help hopin' you had 
news about the tomatoes, and I was so 
excited that I forgot my manners." 

"Tomatoes? Why, I believe they did 
mention tomatoes." Nub took off his 
cap, ran his fingers through his hair, 
and seemed to be making an effort to 
recall something. "Let me see." He 
shut one eye and cocked the other 
ceilingward. 

Tillie seized him by the shoulder 
and shook him vigorously. "Stop that 
foolishness and tell us what you did 
hear." 

"Haven't got breath enough." Nub 
gasped and made as if to fall. "See? 
I'm about to faint. Too much excite- 
ment. Weak heart, and so forth, and 
so forth. Give me time." 

"O Nub— Nub!" 

"Well, if you will have it, Miss Mas- 
ten phoned that Mis s Tillie Foster had 
won first prize, and she's had an offer 
of ten cents a can for every little old 
can you've both got. So there!" — Me- 
ta Folger Townsend, in Girl's World. 




ASHEVILLE DISTRICT— C. A. Wood, 
Presiding Elder, Weavervllle, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Fairview Ct, Tweeds 7-8 

Tryon and Saluda, Tryon 8 

Weaverville Ct.. Salem 14-15 

Mars Hill, Laurel 15 

Leicester, Leicester 21-22 

Walnut, Jewell HU1 % 28 

March 

Spring Creek, Balm Grove 1 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— Plato T. Dur- 
ham, Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Ansonvllle, Ansonvllle 7-8 

Lilesville, Lilesville 8-9 

Morven, Sandy P. 14-16 

Wadesboro, night 16 

Union ville, Grace 21-22 

Polkton, Peachland, night 22-23 

March 

Matthews, Matthews 1-2 

Marshville, Gilboa 7-8 

ML Zlon, Mt. Zlon 14-16 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT— G. T. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Coleridge Ct, Concord 7-8 

Ramseur and F'vllle, Ramseur 8-9 

Ruffln Ct, Kuffin 14-16 



MOUNT AIRY DISTRICT— R. M. Hoyle, 
Presiding Elder, Mount Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Jonesvllle Ct, Jenesvllle 7-8 

Elkln Station 8-9 

Banbury Ct, Davis' Chapel 14-16 

Spray and Draper, Spray 21-22 

Leaksvllle Station 23-24 

Dobson Ct. Slloam 28 

March 

Yadklnvllle, East Bend 1-2 



MORGANTON DISTRICT— J. E. GAY, 
Presiding Elder, Marlon, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Connelly Springs, Connelly Springs, 7-8 

Micavllle, Shoal Creek 13 

Bald Creek, Elk Sboal 14-15 

Burnesvllle, Burnesvllle . 16-16 

Spruce Pine and Bakensvllle, Spruce 
Pin* 21-22 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT— M. 
H. Vestal, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Creston, Creston 7-8 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 10 

Elk Park, Elk Park 12 

Avery. Plnola 14-16 



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Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
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Western North Carolina Conference 

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$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
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only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1.40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

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SALISBURY DISTRICT — W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Elder, Salisbury, N. C. 

February 

Kannapolls Station 14-15 

Landls Circuit, Landls 14-15 

Bethel and Loves Chapel, Bethel ..21-22 

Concord, Ep worth, night 22 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m 2$, Mar. 1 

Concord, Westford, night 28, Mar. 1 

SHELBY , ulSTRICT-^l. R. Scroggs, 
Presiding Elder, Shelby, N. C. 

February 

Lowell, Lowell 14 

McAdenvllle McAdenville, night 14 

Crouse, Antloch 21 

Cherryville, Mary's Chapel 28 

Second Round 

Stanley, Stanley 7-8 

Lincolnton 8-9 

Gastonia, Main Street 15 

Ozark and West End 15 

Kings Mountain, night 27 

Bessemer City, P. M 28 

STATESV1LLE DISTRIST— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Elder, Statesvllle, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Cool Springs Ct., New Salem, 

11 a. m 14-15 

Troutman Ct, Vanderburg, 11 a. m., 21-22 
Mooresville Sta., Mooresville, night, 22-23 
Mooresville CL, Fairview, 

11 a. m 28, Mar. 1 

March 

Davidson Sta., Davidson, night 1-2 

Marion Station 7-8 

N. Lenoir Ct., ML Zion, 11 a. m. ..7-8 
Lenoir Sta., Lenoir, night 8-9 



WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
dell, Presiding Elder, R. 2, Ashevllle, 
N. C. 

February 

Ranger Ct., Ranger 7 

Murphy Station 8-9 

Robbinsville, Robbinsville 11-12 

Murphy Ct., Tomotla 14 

Andrews Station 15-16 

Crestmont 21-22 

Waynes ville Station 24 

Canton Station 25 

WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, Pre- 
siding Elder, Winston, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Lewlsville, Sharon 7-8 

Southsid.e night 8-9 

Centenary, 11 a. m 14 

West End, 7:30 p. m ..14 

Farmington, Farmlngton 21-22 

Advance, Advance 22-23 



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February 5, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



m: 



■tn i' • 



Publishers Appeal for Advocate Campaign 

=— — 1914 — 



The lists for each pastoral charge have been sent out and 
are now in the hands of the pastors. If any pastor has failed to 
receive lists or if any lists received are incomplete we will 
thank them to notify the office at once so correct lists may be 
sent. 

Now is the time to press the battle. These beautiful winter 
days offer great opportunity for pastoral work and there is 
no better way to carry on your Advocate campaign than in 
connection with pastoral visiting. To present the matter of 
family worship, family reading and the general subject of 
home culture makes the pastoral visit a matter of real value 
to the home and will make the pastor feel that he is really do- 
ing something worth while for his people. Working on this 
line a pastor can almost always leave the church paper behind 
him as a permanent blessing to the home he has visited. He 
may not always find the family with the money at hand, but 
if he will take the subscription to be paid in 30 or 60 days and 
send along the name we will start the paper at once. 

If at the expiration of the 30 or 60 days the money is not 
forthcoming, all the pastor has to do is to drop a postal card 
notifying the office and the name will be charged off the ac- 
count. This is the best way to sample our people and get them 
interested in the church paper. 

Where the pastor prefers he can arrange for a canvass 
through a committee or some representative of the church. 
For instance, a Baraca class or Philathea class will frequently 
prove a very effective helper in such work. Always give us 
time to supply at least two sample copies before the canvass is 
made. 

We are trying very hard to give our people a paper without 
so much space devoted to advertising. We hope our people 
will show their appreciation of this by increasing our circula- 
tion. In order to have a paper clear of advertising of any 
doubtful character, we have cut out from $1200. to $1500. per 
annum of our usual income from this source. We must have 
a larger income from subscriptions in order to compensate for 
this loss. 




This cut shows the full silver set described in No. 1. AH other 
premiums including 2, 3, 4 and S are portions of this 
full set. The goods are genuine first-class 
triple plated as described. 



List of Premiums and Prizes 

No. 1. One 26-piece Wm. Eogers Triple Plate 12 oz. Silver 
Set, consisting of one Oak or Mahogany Chest, Six Knives, 
Six Forks, Six Tablespoons, Six Teaspoons, One Sugar Bowl 
and One Butter Knife. The above will be given to the one 
who secures fifty new subscribers. 



No. 2. To the one who will secure thirty -five new sub- 
scriptions, we will give the same assortment of ware only 
without the chest. 

No. 3. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Knives and Forks 
and Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twenty-five 
new subscribers. 

No. 4. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons and one 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in fifteen new sub- 
scriptions. 

No. 5. One Set Rogers Teaspoons, one Sugar Shell, and 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twelve to fifteen 
new subscriptions. 

No. 6. To the ones who will secure ten subscriptions, we 
will give their choice of the following premiums : 

A. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons, one Set 
Rogers Nickle Silver Knives and Forks in a nice box. 

B. One Set Stag Handle Carver, consisting of Carving 
Knife, Fork and Steel. 

C. One Set Aluminum Ware, consisting of one Aluminum 
6-quart Pudding-Pan, one 5-quart Aluminum Milk Pan, one 
Aluminum Dipper, and one Aluminum Cake-Pan. 

* # * * 

In addition to the above we offer the following 
Grand Prizes 

1. To the one sending in the largest number of new sub- 
scribers, provided the number shall not be less than 50, we 
offer, in addition to the premium, one No. 2690 Forbes Quadru- 
ple Plate Tea Set, consisting of one 2^2 pt. Tea Pot, one Sugar 
Bowl, one Cream Pitcher, one Spoon Holder handsomely en- 
graved, and one Butter Dish. 

2. To the one securing the second largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 40, we offer : One 
Nickle-Plated Coffee Percolator Machine, that does away 
with the tannic acid in coffee, and furnishes the pure juice 
of the coffee, especially adapted to the use of old persons 
who are deprived of the use of the beverage on account of its 
injurious effect. With this machine, you can make the best 
drip coffee in five minutes, without injurious qualities. 

3. To the one securing the third largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 30, we offer: 
One Satin-Finished Tilting Triple Plate Water Pitcher, in 
tilting frame. 

4. To the one securing the fourth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 25, we offer : One 
Housekeeper's Casserole, with nickel outside cover — a beauti- 
ful article, and suitable for anyone's table. 

5. To the one securing the fifth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 20, we offer : One 
Kitchen Set, consisting of one Meat Broiler, Ice Pick, Meat 
Fork, Basting Spoon, Butcher Knife, Bread Knife, Cleaver, 
Paring Knife, Can Opener, Bread Toaster, and one ten-hook 
rack to hold above— eleven pieces in all. 

6. To the one securing the sixth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 15, we offer : One 
Ladies' or Gents' Pearl Handle Good Metal Pocket Knife. 

In each case it is understood that the renewals are to 
be collected and in case of the failure of any old subscriber to 
renew, a new subscriber is to be found to take the place of 
the one discontinuing. In no case can a premium or prize be 
awarded where the renewals are neglected. 

Cash must accompany each name sent in, except where 
the pastor is willing to become absolutely responsible. 

Let the work begin at once so that all may have the benefit of 
the paper for the Conference year. 

Address all correspondence regarding the above to 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 5, 1914 



Order Your Piano Through The 

Mm ADVOCATE PIANO CLUB 

And Get the Benefit of the Tremendous Saving in Price 

The less money you waste on agents' commissions and dealers' profits, the farther 
your money will go in buying QUALITY and DURABILITY, the two big items in piano 
values. Club members write us that they are simply astonished at the exquisite tone, 
the surpassing beauty of design and finish, and the splendid construction of the pianos 
furnished by the Club. They cannot understand how it is possible to furnish such 

superb pianos and player pianos at the prices granted to the Club members. But to anyone who knows the inside of the piano 
business, it is all very simple. The explanation lies in " The Power of Numbers." What is impossible for ONE is easy for 
ONE HUNDRED. An army of one hundred buyers is entitled to, and receives the MAXIMUM Factory discount, and that 
cuts a TREMENDOUS slice off the selling price. 

CLUB NOT AN EXPERIMENT NOR A SCHEME 

The Advertising Manager of the North Carolina Christian Advocate and the Managers of the Club are occasionally asked 
whether the Club is simply a theory or scheme, or an actual fact. To this we reply that the Club is the greatest and most 
significant fact in the history of the piano business. Some have asked us whether one hundred people really join and form the 
Club. To these we reply that more than ten clubs of one hundred bona fide members each have already been duly formed and 
that the plan have proven so extremely helpful and popular that it now requires from four to five clubs each year. Over one 
thousand enthusiastic members stand ready to give you the benefit of their experience. Some of these may be your friends, 
or people whom you know. We have printed hundreds of their letters of endorsement in a book and would be glad to send 
you a copy on request. Thousands endorse the plan, — not a single case of dissatisfaction. 

HERE ARE A FEW TYPICAL LETTERS 

They tell of the superior quality of the instruments ; of the lifetime guarantee of quality ; of the big saving in price ; of 
the convenient plan of payment ; of the protection to your family in the event of your death before the instrument is fully paid 
for ; of the uniform courtesy and consideration which they have received at the hands of the Managers. They say that they are 
delighted with every feature of the Club. Read these samples, then write for the booklet which contains hundreds of them. 



"We have one of your Farrand Cecilian Player Pianos and are most delight- 
ed with it. All who have ever heard it are in an agreement that it is one of the 
very best combinations that has ever been put on the market. Persons desiring 
such an instrument will certainly do well to examine yours, and if they will on- 
ly give it a trial, I feel sure that they will look no further." 

LBN G. BROUGHTON, London, S. E. 

(Note: Dr. Broughton is a Minister of world-wide reputation, his church in 
London being, as you probably know, one of the largest in the world. The Player 
he has is the same as that offered by the Club.) 

"The Club Piano that I bought from you last April gives perfect satisfac- 
tion. Its tone is just as round and sweet as it was the day it was placed in my 
home. I have three daughters taking music and they practice on it every day. 
I would advise anyone who wants a good piano to join the Club and get the besf 
The Club Plan is exceptionally good, as it places a fine piano in reach of anyone 
who wishes to buy." MRS. T. S. MARTIN, Greenville, S. C. 

"I have had the Ludden and Bates Piano now almost a year and would not 
take twice the amount of money that I paid for it. If I wanted to buy a dozen 
more, I would buy a Ludden and Bates Piano every time. Not only my family 
but everybody that has seen it and heard it just thinks there is nothing like it." 

MR. & MRS. JOHN A. SMITH, Harrison, Ga. 

"In purchasing a Ludden & Bates Piano I was satisfied I should make no 
mistake, and after a trial of over a year I can testify that it is better than I ex- 
pected. Am so well pleased that if I were in need of another Piano should cer- 
tainly call on you again." JOHN R. DELANEY, Key West, Fla. 

"Our Club Piano arrived safe, and certainly is a beauty. It is all and more 
than we expected. All of the neighbors are delighted with it. Wishing you 
every success, I remain." MRS. J. A. CANE, Langdale, Ala. 

"I have had my piano, which I bought through the Club plan, Two months 
and would not take twice the amount I gave for it if I could not get another. All 
my friends are wild about it and think the tone beautiful and sweet." 

MISS BETTIE HOLLY, Lincolnton, N. C. 

"The prompt and more than courteous attention which I have always 
received at your hands would make me a friend of the Ludden & Bates Piano ft 
its own merits had not already done so. The Piano we purchased of you gives 
entire satisfaction. A. L. COLLINS, Oneco, Fla. 



"We are very much pleased with the Piano. Everyone says it is so sweet 
toned. The Club Plan is splendid, we think." 

M. M. BOST, Morganton, N. C. 




A beautifully illustrated catalogue picturing and de 
scribing the latest and most artistic styles of Pianos anc 
Player Pianos, will be sent free on request. Write fo: 
your copy today. 



Write for your copy of the handsomely illustrated Club Clatalogue today. Address the Manager. 



LUDDEN & BATES 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN 
ADVOCATE PIANO CLUB DEPT. 



Atlanta, Ga. 




Official Orpt of tk Western north ©rolina Conference 
imtfwtist episcopal £burcl), Soutl) 



Thursday, February 12, 1914 




Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 12, 1914 



4 ❖ 

Note and Comment j 

♦ S £ • 

Embargo on Arms Removed by the President 

The embargo against the shipment of arms 
and ammunition from the United States into 
Mexico, which had been in force since March 
14, 1912, was lifted by President "Wilson Feb. 
3, 1914. The President in his proclamation, 
removing the embargo, says that the conditions 
upon which the proclamation of March 14, 
1912, was based essentially changed, making it 
desirable to revoke the former proclamation. 

This action by the President of the United 
States will help the cause of the Constitution- 
alists, who are established in northern Mex- 
ico in easy access to the American border. 
Large quantities of the munitions of war are 
being carried, already, from the United States 
across the Mexican border, and the leaders of 
the forces, that claim to represent constitu- 
tional government, say they have the money 
to purchase all needed supplies. 

Huerta 's treasury, according to persistent re- 
ports, is almost empty. If such be true, Huer- 
ta and his forces will hardly be able to hold 
out very long against the enemy that has been 
fighting with a measure of success, before the 
handicap resulting from the embargo was re- 
moved. Yet, it is impossible to forecast events 
in Mexico. 

# * * # 
One Man Rule for China 

Yuan Shi Kai, the President of China, dis- 
solved the Chinese parliament, which was fol- 
lowed by making Confucianism the state reilg- 
ion; now comes the report that he has dis- 
solved the District Councils in the Province of 
China. These dictatorial acts of the President 
point to the abolition of all semblance of repre- 
sentative government for China and the estab- 
lishment of Mr. Yuan as absolute ruler, if not 
in name, to be such in fact. 

^f* 

The President Opposes Free-Passage of Amer- 
ican Vessels 

That coastwise American vessels should be ex- 
empt from paying toll at the Panama canal, 
is strongly opposed by President Wilson, as 
unjust, and as in violation of the Hay-Paunce- 
fote treaty with Great Britain, which guaran- 
tees equality of treatment to all nations, includ- 
ing the United States, in the matter of tolls. 

As to what is required by the treaty with 
Great Brittain we are not prepared to offer 
an opinion, but, as to the equity of the case, 
the question is exceedingly simple. Exemption 
from tolls is only another form of ship subsidy. 
Why should the United States government 
pay a bonus to the shipping interests of the 
country? President Wilson in his protest is 
right. 

The views of the President will be carried 
out in the House with little difficulty, but 
there is some doubt as to what the Senate will 
do. Senator 0 'Gorman, who led the victorious 
fight in the senate for the exemption of coast- 
wise vessels, declares that he will oppose the 
President in his contentions. 

# • # « * 
Virginia Senate Passes the Enabling Act 

By a vote of 29 to 11, the Senate on February 

5, passed the act under which 18,104 qualified 
voters, by petition to the Governer, may de- 
mand a statewide election on the 22nd of Sep- 
tember next, to decide between state prohibi- 
tion and local option as now exists. The sen- 
ate bill provides that the law, if carried in the 
election, shall not go into effect till May 1, 
1917. It allows the manufacture of wine and 
beer when these are sold exclusively in other 
states, and excludes from the act apple cider 
containing up to 7 per cent, alcohol. These 
amendments were not in the House bill that 
passed by a big majority, and friends of pro- 
hibition in the house will seek to have them 
eliminated. 

# * * # 

The Manufacture of Cotton in North Carolina 

Two hundred and eighty-seven cotton mills 
are in operation in North Carolina, according 



to the latest report of the Commissioner of 
Labor and Printing. These mills employ 59,332 
people, who support a population of 175,000. 
It is estimated that about 85 per cent, of the 
employees can read and write. Wages for men 
range from ninety-five cents to two dollars 
and eighty-two cents a day. The women re- 
ceive froin' eighty cents to one dollar and forty- 
seven cents a day. The average day is ten 
hours and: ilour minutes. 

Capital invested amounts to over fifty mil- 
lion dollars. The mills use 745,000 bales of 
cotton; the manufactured product of all the 
mills reaches $71,306,223. 

# # * * 

Radium in the Treatment of Cancer 

Robert Gunn Bremner, member of Congress 
from the seventh New Jersey district, after 
physicians in this country and Europe had 
tried in vain to cure him of cancer, began the 
radium treatment in a Baltimore sanitarium 
last December. Tubes containing $100,000 
worth of radium were applied to the cancerous 
growth with seemingly good results for a time. 
But the gain was only temporary. Notwith- 
standing his brave fight for life, he grew worse 
and died February 5, 1914. 

This case, receiving so great publicity as the 
press of the country has seen fit to give it, will 
serve to remind the people of the fact, proven 
also, in other instances of less public interest, 
that radium is not a sure cure for cancer. Yet 
physicians, who are high authority, do not 
hesitate to pronounce it of the greatest value in 
the treatment of cancer , 

• * # * 

Bishop Wilson an Octogenarian 

On the evening of February 5, to celebrate 
the eightieth anniversary of the birth of Bish- 
op Wilson, one of the great men of universal 
Methodism, the Methodists of Baltimore gave 
a reception that proved to be a most delight- 
ful occasion. In behalf of the Methodist 
Church, Bishop Denny spoke fitting words of 
congratulations. Representatives of other de- 
nominations paid tribute to the honored Senior 
Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

Among the invited guests from out of town 
were Secretary of the Navy, Daniels, and Sen- 
ator Overman. 

Bishop Wilson occupies the most honored 
place of service in the gift of his church. But 
the office is not as big as the man. His gifts as 
a great gospel preacher, as a wise administrator 
of affairs, as a theologian and church lawyer, 
combined with his matchless Christian char- 
acter, have not only brought honor to the of- 
fice of bishop but have added to the prestige 
and renown of Methodism, particularly of 
Southern Methodism. All North Carolina joins 
with the entire South in extending to him hear- 
tiest congratulations. 

ft * * * * 

Are Presiding Elders Unpopular? 

Some articies that we read in the church pa- 
pers, and much that we hear in certain eccle- 
siastical circles,, would lead one to conclude 
that the standing of presiding elders is not an 
enviable one. Is such a fact? Out of one 
hundred and fifty-eight clerical delegates elect- 
ed to the General Conference in May, seven- 
ty-four are presiding elders. Of the six clerical 
delegates from the Western North Carolina 
Conference, four are presiding elders and the 
other two had been elders a little while ago. 
The Methodist church is not yet ready to put 
the elder on the scrap heap. 

* • # * 

Edwin Ginn 

Eminent in America as an educational pub- 
lisher, Edwin Ginn, who died a little while 
ago at his home in Winchester near Boston, 
achieved world-wide eminence by his note- 
worthy services in the cause of peace. Ginn 
and Company, a publishing house established 
by Mr. Ginn almost fifty years ago, has be- 
come one of the greatest purely educational 
publishing houses in the country, and is a 
monument to his ability and high ideals as a 
publisher. But the world will remember him 
for his long and unselfish service and splendid 
contributions for the cause of peace. For near- 
ly twenty years he has been contributing $50,- 



000 annually to this cause, and in his will is a 
bequest of $1,000,000 for the same. 

"The establishment of the World Peace 
Foundation is Mr. Ginn 's special title to univer- 
sal interest," says the Independent. "There 
has not been in America or in the wor!d in his 
time a more earnest or generous friend of the 
peace cause. His interest dates from nearly 
twenty years back, and first found expression 
in the Mohonk Conferences, in the early days of 
those stimulating and pregnant peace gather- 
ings. It was at Mohonk that the active inter- 
est of our American business was first enlisted 
in the peace cause in a significant way; and 
among all the business men who went to Mo- 
honk Mr. Ginn was moved most signally to ac- 
tion. He told the men there that he would be 
one of ten to give a million dollars for the 
cause of peace." 

* # * * 

A Man Who Won Out 

Colonel Roosevelt in his autobiography, 
which is a story of the life of the American 
apostle of the strenuous life, tells us that as 
a small boy he "was sickly and delicate, suf- 
fered much from asthma and frequently had to 
be taken away on trips to find a place where he 
could breathe." He was also near-sighted and 
at an early age compelled to begin the use 
of glasses. 

That a youth so ill-equipped physically in 
the beginning should have developed into such a 
human dynamo as Colonel Roosevelt has prov- 
en himself to be, is one of the marvels of 
this wonderful man. There are many other 
facts related in this interesting autobiography 
that are fully as remarkable. The story of the 
life of our distinguished ex-president of the 
United States is well worth reading. 

* # # * 

Electric Chairs for the Panama-Pacific Expo- 
sition 

Two hundred electric motor-driven chairs 
will be operated at the San Francisco Exposi. 
tion in 1915, by a Chicago company, to S* 
a concession has been granted by the Exposit^^ 
authorities. The chairs will seat two passen- 
gers, and will be sinuiar to the chairs in use at 
Atlantic City, Palm Beech and other resorts, 
except they are to be propelled by an electric 
motor placed under the seat and connected to 
the rear wheels by use of chains. The electric- 
ity is obtained from a storage battery under 
the wicker dash. The ordinary speed of the 
chair is three and one-half miles an hour, al- 
though a speed of ten miles an hour is possible. 

^ ^ $S- ^ 

Birthdays of Some Celebrities 

Emperor William, the strenuous Kaiser of 
the German Empire, was fifty-five years of age 
January 27. 

Admiral Dewey, the hero of Manila Bay, 
reached, a few weeks ago, his seventy-sixth 
birthday. 

Dr. J. M. Buckley, for many years editor of 
the New York Christian Advocate, and the 
most versatile editor of his generation, was 
seventy-seven December 16, 1913. 

Fanny Crosby will be ninety-four on March 
24, 1914. The Fanny Crosby Circle of Kings 
Daughters at her home in Bridgeport, Conn., 
is requesting all people who have been helped 
by Miss Crosby 's hymns to wear violets on that 
day. Unless the violet crop should be unusu- 
ally large just at that season there would not 
be enough to go round if all should act upon 
the suggestion. 



— Rev. D. V. York, a native North Caroli- 
nian, brother of Rev. B. A. York, of our Con- 
ference, is now Conference Evangelist for the 
West Oklahoma Conference. He has asso- 
ciated with him Rev. J. H. Bridges, a graduate 
of Southwestern University, Georgetown, Tex- 
as, who is said to be a very fine singer and per- 
sonal worker. Brother York has a record of 
very fine success as an evangelist; first in the 
Holston Conference, where he began his work, 
and later in various parts of the West. He 
has a little time he could give to engagements 
in North Carolina and would like to corre- 
spond with those who may feel inclined to 
invite him for a few weeks' work in his na- 
tive state. His address is Eldorado, Okla- 
homa. 



HortD Carolina CDristian Advocate 



ESTABLISHED 1 8 S S 


H. M. BLAIR. Editor 


Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the 


M. E. Church, South 


$1 .50 Per Annum in Advanc 


Volumn LIX 


GREENSBORO, N. C, FEBRUARY 


12, 1914 - 


Number 6 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 

Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C, as 

mail matter of the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Year Jl-50 

Six Months 75 

To all preachers of the Gospel, per year 1.00 

Make all remittances to CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, 
Greensboro, N. C. 

The label on paper shows the date to which sub- 
scription has been paid. Subscribers are urgently re- 
quested to attend promptly to renewals. It Is not 
our custom to discontinue the paper when the time is 
out unless notice Is given. Subscribers who do not 
intend to pay for the paper for over-time should notify 
the office to discontinue. Do not ask the pastor to 
have paper discontinued, but send notice direct to this 
office. 











EDITORIAL 


♦ 



Distinguished Visitors to Methodist Churches 
On Friday night of this week there will be 
held a missionary mass meeting at each of the 
three Methodist churches in this city. The meet- 
ing at West Market Street will be addressed by 
Eev. Dr. W. W. Pinson, Missionary- Secretary 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. At 
Spring Garden Street the addresses will be de- 
livered by Eev. Dr. E. H. Rawlings, Educa- 
tional Secretary of the Board of Missions. At 
Centenary the address will be by Rev. Frank 
Siler, Field Secretary of Missions for Western 
North Carolina Conference. 

This will be a great opportunity for the Meth- 
odists of the city and will be preparatory to 
the Anniversary rally of the Laymen's Mission- 
ary Movement to be held in West Market Street 
church on Sunday evening following. All peo- 
ple of the city are invited to attend these meet- 
ings. 



Great Inter-Church Meeting 

There was held at the Grand Opera House in 
this city on last Sunday evening a meeting of 
more than ordinary interest. Under the au- 
spices of the Inter- Church Association a mass 
meeting of the congregations of the citv had 
been arranged, celebrating the first anniversary 
of this Association. Nearly all the churches 
had given over their services for the evening, 
and a count showed that 1,331 people were 
present. 

Frequent applause greeted the speakers and 
there was a veritable outburst at one time when 
Rev. J. E. Shenk, pastor of the First Lutheran 
church, directed blighting remarks at gamb- 
ling, the bunny hug and the tango. 

The meeting had a review of the past year's 
work and an outline of the prospective work for 
the coming year given by the officers of the As- 
sociation. Progressive measures for the coming 
year's work were suggested by President A. W. 
McAlister. 

The musical part of the program was a de- 
lightful feature, the choir being directed by 
Prof. Wade R. Brown, of the Normal College. 
As the audience assembled West Market's or- 
chestra rendered selections. The opening an- 
them was "Gloria," by Mozart, rendered by 
the united choirs. Another anthem during 
the evening was ' ' Praise Ye the Father, ' ' Gou- 
nod, by the choirs. During the evening the 
congregation sang ' ' The Church's One Founda- 
tion" and "Onward, Christian Soldiers." 

Dr. C. W. Byrd, pastor of West Market 



church, presided and presented the speakers. 
For the Scripture lesson Rev. C. E. Hodgin, 
pastor of Westminster Presbyterian church, 
read a part of the 12th chapter of Matthew. 
Rev. H. E. Rountree, pastor of the First Chris- 
tian church, made the invocation. The bene- 
diction was pronounced by Rev. R. D. Sherrill, 
pastor of Centenary Methodist church. 

Among the progressive measures suggested 
by Mr. McAlister was the amending of the law 
on liquor shipment prohibiting shipments ex- 
cept for medicinal purposes. " • 

The paper read by Mr. McAlister was one of 
unusual ability, in fact, such a paper stamps 
him as a man of uncommon ability. The city 
of Greensboro should appreciate the unselfish 
services of such a man, who though loaded with 
business cares, yet finds time to give to 
leadership in every good work. Moreover, 
the Inter-Church Association has within the 
first year of its existence more than demonstrat- 
ed its usefulness and essential place in develop- 
ing a city of high moral ideals. This Associa- 
tion should not have to appeal in vain for a lib- 
eral support in the great work it is undertaking 
for the city. 

The report of the Secretary, Mr. Harold, 
shows that it is financed by individual subscrip- 
tions ranging from $6 to $200 per year, payable 
quarterly by 106 subscribers. Merchants from 
whom supplies for relief work is secured give a 
discount of from 10 to 20 per cent. The finan- 
cial statement follows : 
Pledges in force Aug., 1912, to 

Jan. 1, 1914 $4419.00 

Pledges unpaid and in force Jan. 1 . .1165.00 
Receipts miscellaneous sources ..... ~ 465.05 

Total receipts ....$3719.05 

Miscellaneous expenses, commissions, 

investigations, etc 421.57 

Printing and postage including The 

Monthly 462.35 

Salaries 2004.45 

Charity ... 587.88 

Total disbursements $3476.25 

Balance on hand 242.75 

As summarized the work embraces associated 
charities, censorship of places of amusement, en- 
actment of the public morals law, increased ac- 
tivity in enforcement of law, a united expres- 
sion of community conscience on moral ques- 
tions, the maintenance of an office as the clear- 
ing house for the religious and social work of 
the community, free children's clinic, family 
visitors doing welfare work, publication of In- 
ter-Church Monthly. 



The Ideal Home 



The family is the unit of organized society. 
When we consider this there is meaning in the 
expression of the Psalmist, "He hath set the 
solitary in families." It is in accordance with 
the divine order that society should be so consti- 
tuted as that the social unit, the family, should 
hold the key to the situation, and that the fam- 
ily life should give type to the larger organiza- 
tion of the community, the state and the nation. 

The home is said to be the man's fortress. So 
sacred is this that no outsider dare to invade its 
interior or disturb the quiet order- of the place, 
for the reason that by the order of providence, 
the man at the head and the woman by his side, 
have committed to them the responsibility of 
preserving its inmates and defending them at 
all hazards. That law of self-defense which 
strikes the foe of life, instinctively calls for a 
like service in the defense of the inner sanctuary 
of the home. Hence, a man may take the life 
of the burglar with impunity, just as one may, 
by the same rule, be acquitted for taking the 



life of him who comes upon him to take life. 

There are few parents, perhaps, who do not 
appreciate this innate law which demands the 
protection of all those in the home when threat- 
ened with physical harm. How few, on the 
other hand, appreciate the higher principle 
which demands that we shall protect the inmates 
of the home from those who would imperil 
their morals? The home was not instituted 
simply as a citadel or fortress against all who 
would do physical harm to its inmates, but pre- 
eminently as a place where the moral and spir- 
itual interests of the inmates might be protected 
against all comers. In the institution of the 
family and the organization of the home God 
has made it possible for the father and mother 
to control the destiny of the child. Born into 
the home, helpless and dependent, with the pow- 
erful instinct which binds the child to the par- 
ent, there would seem no reason why the parents 
should fail to make of their children whatever 
they desire to make of them. By precept and 
example they should find it possible to train 
up the child in the way that he should go, so 
that when he is old he will not depart from it. 

But we began with the purpose of writing of 
the model home. In view of what we have writ- 
ten let it be said that the model home is one in 
which, first of all, there is reverence for 
God — a religious atmosphere— where the evil 
which might otherwise invade it, is expelled, 
not by the exercise of physical force, but by 
the constraining power of a great religious 
faith. 

But such a state of things cannot exist with- 
out religious worship. The home altar, where 
the daily religious service of prayer is main- 
tained, is an essential requisite of the model 
home. No home can be secure from the inva- 
sions of immoral elements from without where 
the daily religious service is not maintained. 
This alone can give the home life immunity in 
the midst of a society full of the contagious 
and festering sores of sin and wickedness. 

The model home furnishes those physical com- 
forts and attractions which are essential to the 
happiness of the inmates. Even the natural af- 
fection of parent and child, of brother and sis- 
ter, can not be maintained amid squalor, filth 
and discomfort. The spirit of discontent must 
eventually break the bonds of the home and 
family life where there is never a penny invest- 
ed for the entertainment, pleasurable instruc- 
tion and enjoyment of the inmates. 

The home in the country affords the easiest 
opportunity of being made a model home. God's 
great outdoors, with broad expanse of earth and 
sky, the merry songs of the birds and joyous 
music of the rill and the ravishing perfume 
of the flowers of field and wood, appeals to all 
that is highest and noblest in the soul, and 
it ought not to be difficult for parents with 
faith in God and intelligent industry to keep 
their children content, if they plan wisely and 
set about the task of really making a home. 

God bless all our homes and help us to make 
them what they should be; for out of great 
homes God makes a great country. 



Rev. J. D. Gibson Dead 

Just as we start the press we learn of the 
death of Rev. J. D. Gibson, pastor of the Deep 
River circuit, which occurred at Central Falls 
on Friday of last week. The body was carried 
to Edneyville, Henderson county, where the 
burial occurred on Saturday. The immediate 
cause of Bro. Gibson's death was pneumonia. 



If you are a true Christian remember that 
you are the child of a king and, as such, can 
claim your place in the family of God. All 
things are yours. 



Page Four 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 12, 1914 



i Contributions j 
» 

Wanted — A Little Money and a Big Man 

The annual meeting of the Cuban Mission 
has just been held. The work in every part 
of the Mission shows steady and healthy 
growth. u . 

The membership shows increase, and both 
the native preachers and members of the 
church evince a deeper spirituality than ever 
before. In all my rounds I have seen no 
Conference in the session of which there were 
more cheering manifestations of spiritual pow- 
er than the session of the Cuban Mission at 
Camaguey, January 22nd-25th. Perfect har- 
mony, warm brotherly love, and a great zeal 
for the advancement of Christ's kingdom pre- 
vailed in all the proceedings. 

The work on the Isle of Pines interested 
me especially. It is largely a work for Amer- 
icans, who have taken up their abode on the 
wonderful island in the Carribean Sea. 

By the treaty of Paris, made by Spain and 
the United Sates just after the Spanish- 
American War, many people were led to sup- 
pose the Isle of Pines was ceded to our coun- 
try, but the stipulations of the treaty on this 
point were ambiguous, and our government 
gave the benefit of the doubt to the Republic 
of Cuba. Before the matter was finally set- 
tled a number of Americans bought land on 
the island, thinking they were settling on ter- 
ritory under our flag. 

These American colonists cleared up their 
lands, built houses, planted citrus-fruit trees, 
and otherwise improved the properties which 
they had bought. They have been forced to 
live hard while their trees have been coming to 
fruit bearing. Most of them have suffered 
financially while they have been waiting; but 
they have not despaired nor forgotten God. 
While compelled to practice the most rigid 
economy, they have provided places of worship 
and supported the preachers sent them. 

Their case has been pathetic in many re- 
spects. In the midst of their struggles in a 
foreign land, their little children have been 
growing up without the educational oppor- 
tunities and religious privileges which they 
would have had in the home land. Children 
in a foreign colony suffer far more than the 
older people, and the needs of these American 
children on the Isle of Pines appeals to me 
very strongly. 

The case is clearly presented in a letter, 
just received from Rev. M. H. Stewart, the 
only preacher we now have on this entire is- 
land. It is as follows: , 

"Havana, Cuba, Jan. 29, 1914. 

"Bishop W. A. Candler, 

Atlanta, Ga. 
"My Dear Bishop: 

"I wish to write you about the Isle of Pines and 
our work among the American settlers there. 

"The Isle of Pines is remarkable in many respects. 

"Its possibilities in the growth of citrus fruits, pine- 
apples and vegetables are great. 

"In addition to its great natural resources, it is 
further remarkable in that it is the largest settlement 
of Americans outside the bounds of the United States. 
There are on the island nearly three thousand Ameri- 
cans, besides about twenty-five hundred natives, the 
total population being about five thousand souls. 

"The natives are located mostly in, or near, the 
towns of Nueva Gerona and Santa Pe. Nueva Gerona 
is the capital of the island, and a very important 
place. In and around it are located about seven or 
eight hundred acres. 

"We are placed in a position of peculiar responsi- 
bility for the welfare of these people, because our 
church is the only evangelical denomination whose 
work extends over the whole island. These Americans 
are not rich, but in the main they are people who 
have bought land with their savings, and for some 
years to come they can expect only small incomes 
from their properties. They are depending on Southern 
Methodists to help them through this trying period. 

"At Nueva Gerona we need for the proper care of 
the people and the promotion of our work a church, a 
school and a parsonage. We now hold services in a 
poor building, which is entirely unsuited to the demands 
of the situation. It is a temporary structure, which 
is inadequate, unsightly and insecure. 

"The case is nothing less than deplorable. The Ro- 
man Catholics, seeing the situation, and desiring to 
take advantage of it, have withdrawn their Spanish 
priests, and have sent American priests and nuns to 



the island. They have opened a school and are seek- 
ing to get hold of the American children. To save 
these children we must do something, and do it quickly. 

"Unless we do our full duty by these countrymen of 
ours and their children, and do it soon, both they and 
our work on the island must suffer untold harm. 

"We now have no means whatever with which to 
help these Americans in and around Nueva Gerona to 
shield their children from the peculiar and perilous 
temptations by which they are surrounded. In the 
town are quite a number of saloons and poolrooms, 
and there is no wholesome place to which young pe- 
ple can go for recreation and self-improvement. They 
must go into the streets or into worse places. 

"We must have an attractive church and an adequate 
school with the residence of the preacher attached to 
meet the needs of the situation. 

"With eight or ten thousand dollars we can build 
on the lot which we have already acquired, all these, 
with reading rooms, etc., to provide for the pressing 
needs of these dear people and their children. Of this 
amount I can raise on the field $5,000.00, I am sure, 
if the church at home will supply the rest. It is 
heart-rending to see good American boys and girls 
going to ruin and their lives made unhapy for lack of 
a little means to lead them into better ways. 

"I do not live at Nueva Gerona, but in another part 
of the island, and by consequence, I am not in a 
position to do much for them. We ought to place in 
the town a resident pastor and give him the means 
to handle successfully this situation, which makes such 
a moving appeal to all hearts who care for the wel- 
fare of our fellow countrymen and their children liv- 
ing under such conditions. 

"Each year many children reach school age, and the 
population increases constantly by the coming of other 
Americans from the States. If we do not meet the 
pressing needs we will close future opportunities 
against us. On the other hand, if we care for the 
situation as it is now, we will do much to save these 
Americans and their children, securely plant our work 
on the island, and obtain resources for other work in 
the future. 

"I hope you will find in the States the small sum of 
money which is now urgently needed here, and another 
man for the West Circuit. 

"Tours in Christ, 

MALCOLM H. STEWART, 
Preacher in charge Isle of Pines, East Ct. 

I want this house and a man for the western 
side of the island. 

If we help these people now, they will be 
able in a few years to help others. They are 
ready to do all they can for themselves. In- 
deed, they have already done very generous 
things. They will in a few years, be able 
to do more; and I believe they will do all 
they promise, if we help them in this their 
time of need. 

I want a man also; a self-reliant, courag- 
eous, hopeful, consecrated man. No "tender- 
foot" (as they say in the West) can be of 
any use. A man of culture, if he has the right 
sort of culture, will be better than an unedu- 
cated man. But common sense and consecra- 
tion are indispensable in this work. 

Here is the chance to do the work of a 
founder and accomplish results that will make 
the Isle of Pines a Methodist island. I covet 
for our crown this pearl of the Carribean. 

Who will furnish this money? 

Who will offer to do a man's work on behalf 
of these, our countrymen, in a foreign land? 

The colonists will give an efficient man a 
living salary. 

Warren A. Candler. 



Letter From Korea 

It has been some months since I wrote you 
last, but after all I wonder if you really care 
to hear from me and the work that I am try- 
ing to do in this far away corner of the earth. 
Far away and yet just as near the great 
white throne and the great loving heart of the 
Father as is any other corner of this poor old 
sin-cursed earth. Well, sometimes I am lost 
in the inky blackness of this old sin-ruined 
country. I feel as though ther is not another 
place that it so bad. And then again through 
the papers and the books that come to us from 
other parts of the world I get a view of things 
in other places and wonder which is the worst 
in the sight of the pure and holy God, these 
in so-called heathen darkness or those in so- 
called Christian lands. With all the "New 
Theology" that is being dished out these days 
one hardly knows what to expect next. The 
thing that gives this writer comfort is that 
he does not have to believe it, much less teach 
it to others. 

During the fall term of our Union -Theolog- 
ical Seminary I have been teaching New Tes- 
tament Introduction and the Epistle to the 



Galatians. You may be sure that they have 
not been spoiled by any modern thought dish- 
ed up and served in tasty style by this hum- 
ble teacher. What shall I do when the spring 
term opens and I am to teach them Old Tes- 
tament Introduction and the Psalms? If I 
tell them Moses wrote the first five books in 
the Old Testament and that Noah was a real, 
"sure enough" person and that Abraham was 
likewise a real man who had a son named Isaac 
and that his father in obedience to God's com 
mand offered him as a sacrifice, what will the 
class think of me? Do you not see that I am 
plainly up against it? You need not walk 
the floor at night wearying about what I will 
tell them on any of these subjects. 

But is it not strange to .think of me teach 
ing in a Theological Seminary — well strange 
things will never cease. I had twenty-three 
men in my class, had the same class for both 
subjects and found that I had nearly a man's 
job to give them honest work since we had no 
sort of a textbook on New Testament Intro- 
duction and I had to translate the lessons day 
by day as we used them. Of course we had 
Paul's great Epistle translated into good Ko- 
rean as we now have the entire Bible in the 
Korean language . These twenty-three men 
made up the freshman class and were inter- 
esting in no small degree. Some of them were 
young men only eighteen or twenty while oth- 
ers were on the shady side of life, two being 
more than fifty. One of these older ones has 
a son in the same school but in a class ahead 
of his father. Some few of the men are bright ; 
many of them are good students; only a few 
are poor students. I gave weekly written ex- 
aminations and all who made an average grade 
of ninety were excused from a final exam- 
ination. On this basis only five had to take 
the final in Galatians and only six in JM. T. 
Introduction. Two men, mark as close as I 
could, recieved an average of 99.5 while only 
one man fell below 70 and so failed to pass at 
aU. 

M the Seminary there are about one hun- 
dred students; twenty of these are nieojbers 
or our church and the remainder members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The 
school is a union of that church and ours. 
These are the men to whom we must look in the 
future to take the lead in the work of the 
church in this land. O, how we feel the need 
of the help and power of the Holy Spirit in 
trying to train them for leadership in the 
church- 
But all my work has not been in the school. 
The last turn of the "Ecclesiastical Wheel" 
dropped me down in Seoul and left me in 
charge of the Seoul district, two city churches 
and two country circuits with teaching in the 
Theological Seminary as a sort of side line. 
Well, at any rate I have found enough to 
keep me busy most of the time and do not 
see any room for a protracted vacation just 
ahead. All right, praise the Lord, I have been 
able to keep at the job ever since it was as- 
signed to me till the last week I have been 
partially knocked out by a very severe cold, 
but I am at it again and hope to keep it up 
as long as the good Lord seen best. 

During the past three months I have been 
away from home looking after the work twen- 
ty-seven days and expect, the Lord willing, 
to be away most of the time from now till the 
middle of March when our school opens again 
and I shall have to return to my work there 
for the next three months. 

We are having it cold on this side of the 
world. It has been as low as nine below zero 
and I was out in the country holding Bible 
classes, teaching and sleeping in rooms with- 
out either fireplace or stove. But do not be 
in too great haste to pity me as we were in 
Korean houses which were warmed by build- 
ing a fire under the floor. It was not always 
just as warm as we desired, but it was for 
the most part fairly comfortable. 

Some of our friends may want to know 
about our health, especially Mary's. It gives 
us great joy to say that we have all been very 
well and Mary is in school and seems to be 
well so far as her old trouble is concerned. 

Cordially yours, 

J. Robert Moose. 



February 12, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Five 



.{.«««.....».«.»«..»»»»»»»«...»«««««• ; • 

Christian Life 

I » 

HOW THEY SPENT THEIR MONEY 
By Robert J. Burdette 

Selfishness 

I kept all my wealth — and I mourn for my loss, 
For gold in a skeleton hand turns to dross; 
Love, friendship and gTatltude might I have bought, 
But I kept all my wealth till it mouldered to naught. 

Pleasure 

I spent all my gold, I danced and I sang, 

The palace I built with hilarity rang. 

Plays, revels, and frolics from even to dawn 

But I lie here with nothing — I spent it — it's gone! 

Avarice 

I loaned my good money at grasping per cent. — 
'Twas I who got all that you kept and you spent; 
While I counted my millions, death plundered me bare, 
And this grave that I sleep in belongs to my heir. 

Charity 

It was little I had, but I gave all my store 
To those who had less, or who needed it more; 
And I came with death laughing, for here at the grave 
In riches unmeasured I found what I gave! — Exchange. 



The Soul's Longing 

Nothing can satisfy the longing of the soul 
hut God. The soul is immortal, and there- 
fore cannot be fed with earthly things. Kiehes, 
honor, ease, comfort and all that can be be- 
stowed will fail to satisfy its hunger. It cries 
out for God. It must have communion with 
the unseen and the eternal. It seeks intimacy 
with the world above. "What a thought. Each 
of us has domiciled in these bodies this spark 
of immortal life, and it longs for its freedom 
from the entanglement. It will revel amid 
those surroundings where God is honored. It 
drinks in the beautiful and the sublime. It 
soars, and sings, and shouts, eager for its na- 
tive element; can hardly be content with its 
present surroundings. Like the eagle in its 
cage, it longs for an upward flight. The high- 
est mountain crag of earth will not answer 
for a perch. Beyond sun and moon and stars 
it must soar. Beyond where morning light 
shines, or evening shadows gather, it must 
ascend. 

It is an impressive and awful thought, that 
as individuals we have this soul in custody. 
It is my soul. It has been committed to my 
care. Its welfare is in my hands. Shall I 
be true to the promptings of this spiritual na- 
ture, or recreant to my sacred trust? I feel 
the stir of vast enterprises around me. With- 
in the struggle continues. I cannot repress 
the feelings. It is immortality that is assert- 
ing its rights. The soul seeks for help. It 
must have it. See to it, my brother, that it 
is properly fed. — Michigan Christian Advocate. 
# * # * 

Effected Through Prayer 

It is a wonderful thought that the Chris- 
tian through prayer, can secure advantages 
and results which he could not otherwise ob- 
tain, and in a way that is known only by 
God and himself. 

An example of this kind recently occurred. 
A Christian man was doing some literary work 
for a religious paper, located hundreds of miles 
from his home. It was work for a special de- 
partment. Word came to him that another 
writer, connected with that paper, expressed 
a desire to fill that department, and it was 
within his power to obtain the place. The 
other man made no protest against being sup- 
erseded, nor did he refer to the matter in 
any way; but he just asked God to so order 
the affair that justice might be done to him- 
self, and that, if it were according to His will, 
he might continue in that work. 

Shortly afterward, the man receieved word 
that the other one had decided that he would 
not take that position. This is what that writer 
expected. He put the matter into God' hands, 
fully believing that He could so influence the 
mind of the other man as to lead him to aban- 
don his purpose. 

This incident shows that there are times 
when no material or physical means are neces- 
sary to be used in connection with answers 
to one's prayers. Many times human agencies 



are employed by God to bring answers to the 
prayers of His people; but it is not an exclu- 
sive rule. 

One is reminded of King David, when he 
was in great trouble from the conspiracy of 
his son Absalom. Ahithophel was in league 
with Absalom. David prayed thus: "O Lord, 
I pray Thee, turn the counsel of Ahithophel 
into foolishness." This short prayer was duly 
answered. God did for David what David 
could not do for himself. He influences the 
minds of men when nothing else can. 

# # # * 

The Power that Saves 

A man is telling a friend the story of his 
redemption from a life of wretchedness. He 
says: "I was a hopeless drunkard, alienated 
from my family, spurned by my acquaintances 
and despised by everybody. Some one told me 
that I was a child of God. That was wonder- 
ful enough in itself. But he said also that 
God was with me; that I had only to use the 
divine strength at hand to lift myself out of 
the mire into which sin had hurled me. Then 
I laid hold on God, pulled myself together, 
and rose to a new life. It looked like my own 
effort, but it was God who saved me from my- 
self." 

A rough looking man in a Bowery mission 
is giving his testimony to a crowd of men who 
are ' ' down and out. ' ' He says : ' 'I was a thief, 
a slugger and a dope fiend. I got down to 
rags. I nearly starved to death. I came into 
this place for a cup of coffee and a warm 
corner. I heard about Jesus, the sinner's 
friend. I tumbled up to that front bench. 
They told me to pray. I just yelled '0 Jesus, 
help a poor fool.' In about a minute the big- 
best thing in my life happened. I do not know 
how it was done, but I haven't cracked a head 
or snatched a poeketbook since, and dope has 
nothing on me any more. ' ' 

A keen-faced man with a scholarly east of 
countenance is quietly explaining to a com- 
panion how he came to be a Christian. Ha 
says: "I was an agnostic, but my philosophy 
went to pieces under trouble. The scheme I 
had wrought out for myself looked well on 
paper, but it could not stand the strain of mis- 
fortune. The puzzle of life became more and 
more involved, s saw no issue from the laby- 
rinth; I contemplated suicide. Some one put 
into my hand the Gospel of John. I found the 
clue to the maze of life in that book: 'I am 
the way, the truth and the life.' No one 
can imagine how that sentence shook me to 
the utmost depths. To speak briefly about 
a thing that was as vast as eternity to me, I 
found Christ to be the secret of the riddle. 
In Him I saw God, in terms of human ex- 
perience, and, like the skeptic in the Gospel 
of John, I cried : 'My Lord and my God ! ' " 

Three men, three life stories, three miracles, 
but one power and one result — the power of 
God made available through simple trust — the 
result, a life hid with Christ in God. 

# # # * 

He Found His Footing 

Writing of the late Senator Shelby M. Cul- 
lom, of Illinois, the editor of the New Orleans 
Christian Advocate says : 

"Though entirely respectful in his attitude 
toward Christianity and the holder of a pew 
in a Presbyterian church, he has commonly 
been regarded as a skeptic or free-thinker. In 
the concluding chapter of his interesting vol- 
ume, "Fifty Years in the Public Service," 
which was published about a year ago, is con- 
tained the following pathetic utterance : "I 
have survived both of my wives and all of my 
children. As I think of it now, I do not know 
where I obtained the strength to survive all 
these sorrows. I have no great fear of death, 
except the natural dread of the physical pain 
which usually accompanies it. I certainly 
wish, beyond any words I have power to ex- 
press, that I could have greater assurance that 
there will be a reuniting with those we love 
and those who loved us in some future world: 
but from my reading of Scripture, and even 
admitting that there is a hereafter, I cannot 
find any satisfactory evidence to warrant such 
a belief. Could I believe that I should meet 
the loved ones who have gone before, I do not 



know but that I should look forward with 
pleasure to the ' passing across ! ' Not having 
this belief, I am quite content to stay where 
I am as long as I can ; and, finally, when old 
Charon appears to row me over the Styx, I 
shall be ready to go." 

This touching and appealing statement so 
impressed us when it first appeared that we 
printed it in the Advocate and made editorial 
comment upon it. It was therefore with great 
interest that we noted in the public prints 
since the decease of Mr. Cullom, the following 
utterance by Dr. Charles Wood, of the Presby- 
terian Church, who was his friend and who was 
closely associated with him in his last days: 
"In the last few months his feeling about 
eternity changed completely. He told me that 
he believed in God and Christ and immortal- 
ity, and added: 'I want to make at the first 
opportunity a statement of my simple creed, 
to be inserted after the last chapter of my 
recollections, to correct the doubt expressed 
on a dark day when the light was dim.' " 

Whether the statement referred to was ever 
prepared by Mr. Cullom, Dr. Wood could not 
say ; but it is to be hoped that it was. Inserted 
in the fascinating volume from the Senator's 
pen, it would be an eloquent testimonial of 
his faith and would be widely read through 
the coming years. 

Is not this another fulfillment of that mem- 
orable promise made by our Lord, "If any 
man is willing to do His will, he shall know 
of the doctrine whether it be of God or wheth- 
er I speak of myself." Senator Cullom seem- 
ed to be thoroughly honest in his doubts and 
to have a sincere longing to know the truth, 
and if we may believe what we are told, he 
was led through the fog into the light at last. 
We doubt if any worthy soul; enveloped in 
darkness, that earnestly sought to find its way 
out ever failed to do so. It is our conviction 
that a guiding Hand, unseen by the physical 
eye, is invariably reached forth to all such 
stragglers. 

We are happy to believe that this honest, 
capable, high-minded public servant found a 
real footing for his faith before the long- de- 
ferred summons that called him into eternity 
came. But we wish that he had secured it 
earlier. Nothing can irradiate old age like the 
glorious hopes born of an unwavering trust 
in God and the promises of His precious word. 
Sustained and inspired by these, instead of 
being harassed by the forebodings of doubt, 
one may triumphantly sing: 

''I face me toward the sunset sky, 
And all my soul is glad; 
For the evening holds a glory 
Which the morning never had." 



Better the chance of shipwreck on a voyage 
of high purpose than to expend life in pad- 
dling hither and thither on a shallow stream 
to no purpose at all. — Miss Sedgewick. 

* « * « 

It is not so much by Christ who lived so 
blameless and beautiful eighteen centuries ago 
that we are saved directly, but by the Christ 
wo form in our hearts, and live out in our 
daily life, that we save ourselves, God working 
with us both to will and do. — Theodore Parker. 

* • • * 

To believe that in all our practical activities 
we are working with God, that in all our sub- 
tle scientific researches we are but thinking 
over his thoughts, that it is the Eternal Spir- 
it who drives the car along the street and 
flashes our message around the world — all this 
is literally true. Change your words a little, 
and for nature's forces say the Eternal Will, 
for nature's laws the Eternal and Unchange- 
able Thought, and you have the religious con- 
ception exactly. — J. Frederick Dutton. 

* * # # 

The bright, cheerful view is always the 
healthiest. It is not necessary to see every- 
thing through rose-colored glasses, for one's 
daily life has its share of thorns and thistles 
which cannot be imagined away. One must 
look beyond them and above them, and, real- 
izing to the full the blessings that are ours, 
take less heed of the shadows and defects. — 
Jewish Messenger 



Page Six 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 12, 1914 



❖ »»❖ 

From the Field 

>;.«»».«.«...»».».».»»«..........«...;, 

Notes and Personals 

— See the Report of the Campaign for New 
Subscribers on page seven. 

— Rev. Geo. D. Herman, of Wadesboro, held 
a meeting at TIanna's chapel last week. 

— The Sunday school of North Asheville 
church has assumed the support of a native mis- 
sionary in China. 

— China Grove is to have a Farm Life 
School, which will be organized in connection 
with the former High School. 

— Rev. H. C. Wright, a member of the Ken- 
tucky Conference, died suddenly at his home 
at Worth ville, Ky., last week. 

— Weaverville is to be supplied with water 
and sewer lines in the near future, $27,000. in 
bonds being available for that purpose. 

— Rev. J. A. Bowles, our pastor at Forest 
City, reports that they are getting on nicely 
with the work for a new $10,000 church at 
that place. 

— Rev. Dr. Scroggs' hosts of friends are de- 
lighted to see him out again on the streets. He 
has entirety recovered from his recent serious 
illness. — Shelby Star. 

— Mr. A. N. Harmon, one of the oldest mem- 
bers of our church at Elbethel on the King's 
Mountain charge, passed away at his home 
near that place last week. 

— There was held in Hickory last week a very 
interesting meeting of pastors and lay-leaders 
of the Statesville District. The attendance was 
good and the discussions enthusiastic. 

—The work of Rev. Dr. F. N. Parker, Pro- 
fessor of Biblical Literature and College pastor, 
is said to be an ever-increasing power for good 
among the students of Trinity College. 

— Rev. L. P. Bogle, of Ruffin circuit, is de- 
livering a series of special lectures in the Acad- 
emy at Ruffin. On last Friday night his sub- 
ject was "Henry W. Grady, the Southern Pa- 
triot." 

— The congregation of Trinity church, Balti- 
more, gave a reception on February 5th in 
honor of Bishop A. W. Wilson, who was eighty 
years old that day. The good Bishop received 
many congratulations. 

— Bethel church, on the Salisbury circuit, lo- 
cated near Trading Ford, is undergoing some 
important improvements. A front of modern 
design is being built and a belfry erected and 
the building considerably beautified. 

— Rev. H. M. North, presiding elder of the 
Durham District, announces that Rev. E. L. 
Peerman, missionary to Korea and now at 
home on furlough, has been appointed pastor 
of the Yanceville circuit, North Carolina Con- 
ference. 

- — Rev. J. E. Woosley has entered upon his 
work for the third year on the Morven circuit 
with great encouragement. The people have 
shown marked appreciation of the pastor and 
his family as they have entered \ipon the work 
of the new year. 

— Rev. M. H. Vestal, presiding elder of the 
North Wilkesboro District, reports the work 
starting off well throughout the dictrict. Rev. 
W. M. Bagby is supplying the Avery charge 
and Rev. T. H. Eller, local preacher, is in 
charge of Elkville mission. 

— Rev. Jesse W. Jennings, D. D., for many 
years manager of the Kansas City Depository 
of the Methodist Book Concern, died on Jan- 
uary 27th, aged sixty-two. He was a native 
of South Bend, Indiana and entered the min- 
istry in Nebraska in 1884. 

— A beaiitiful story entitled Tillie's Tenth 
was printed in the children's column of the 
Advocate last week. The story was by Mrs. F. 
L. Townsend, and we regret the oversight by 
which we failed to call attention to it. It will 
pay the reader to look it up. 

— At the quarterly conference recently held 
on the Mt. HoUy and Belmont charge a new 
church of modern design was authorized for the 
congregation at Mt. Holly. Rev. N. R. Rich- 
ardson is the pastor and he is taking hold of the 
work with much encouragement. 

— Just as we go to press (Tuesday) we learn 
in a telegram from Brother J. W. Ingle that the 
son of Brother J. H. Green died last night, and 



that' the interment would be at Leicester Wed- 
nesday (11th). Our sympathy goes out to our 
brother and family in their grief. 

— Figures compiled by the Greensboro In- 
ter-Church Association show that the whiskey 
shipped into the city during the month of 
January" amounted to 3,404 gallons, an aver- 
age of .ftlO-8 gallons a day. The shipments 
of beer amounted to 6,360 bottles. 

— A press dispatch from Knoxville, Tenn., 
dated February 4th, says: — Mrs. William G. 
Brownlow, widow of .'Parson" Brownlow, 
widely known as a churchman and editor, died 
here this morning in her 95th year. She was 
well known throughout the South. 

— Rev. E. Myers, of the Mooresville circuit 
writes : — We are starting off right well in our 
work generauy on Mooresville circuit. The 
raising of $100.00 a special for missions at 
Triplett church is the easiest thing we have 
undertaken on this charge. Our work is very 
hopeful. 

— We have learned with sincere regret of 
the death of Miss Annie Stone, which occurred 
at the home of her brother, Mr. J. Lee Stone, 
at Hickory, on Monday, February 2nd. Miss 
Stone was a member of our charge at Forest 
Fill in the nineties and was a woman of fine 
Christian character. 

— Following the custom of many years' 
standing, a series of special religious services 
began at Trinity College, Durham, N. C, Sun- 
day, February 1. The services were under the 
direction of the Y. M. C. A., and Rev. H. M. 
North, presiding elder of the Durham District, 
did the preaching. 

— The Ministerial Association of Concord 
has decided on Sunday, March 8th, as "Go 
to Church Sunday." The church may do 
great good by making a general rally on oc- 
casions to secure larger attendance at church. 
The rally ought, however, to be made more 
frequently than once a year. 

— At West Market Street church Sunday 
evenipg, February 15, there will be held a 
grand rally of the Philatheas and Baracas 
of the city under the direction of the Baraca 
city union. The feature of the evening will 
be an , address by Rev. F. T. Collins, the gifted 
young pastor of the Reidsville Baptist church. 

— Rev. J. A. B. Fry, a former student of 
Trinity College, and for the last seven years 
pastor of the; Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, at Berkeley, Cal., the seat of the Uni- 
versity of California, will deliver a lecture 
at Trinity College, Durham, N. C, March 1. 
Mr. Fry is now in Europe, but expects to re- 
turn in a few weeks. 

— The Woman's Missionary Society of Main 
Street church, Gastonia, has secured the ser- 
vices of Miss Terrie E. Buttrick, of Asheville, 
recently returned from work as a missionary 
in Mexico, to deHver a lecture on Mexico at 
an early date. The Mission Study Class has 
been studying Dr. G. B. Winton's book, "Mex- 
ico Today," and the lecture on Mexico will be 
of especial interest to the members for this 
reason. 

— The burning of the dormitory at Elhanan, 
the orphanage' conducted by Miss Perry, near 
Marion, is a great calamity. This occurred 
on Sunday night, February 1st. The building 
was in flames when the fire was discovered 
and it took prompt work to rescue the eight 
children asleep in the building. The dormitory 
was a two-story frame structure and the loss 
is $8,000 to $10,000. Fire is supposed to have 
originated from a lamp or stove flue. 

— The Statesviile Landmark says : Liquor 
was shut out of Statesville drug stores with 
the advent of local prohibition more than ten 
years ago and they've never sold it. The idea 
was to make Statesville dry in fact as well as 
in name and this town has never had the drug 
store bars that make prohibition a farce in other* 
towns. ' ' '"Now let the Landmark give us the 
report from the express office. In most of our 
towns th f e' express office has become a dispen- 
sary. 

— Rev. A. R. Surratt recently returned from 
a very pleasant visit of three weeks to rela- 
tives in Florida. The Madison Herald, com- 
menting on their report of the country and 
their visit says: — Mr. Surratt was "especially 
carried .away with the country, its resources, 
etc. He has also been telling some powerful 
fish tales since he got home, and owing to the 



fact that he is a preacher in good and regular 
standing, everybody has believed everything 
he has told about them so far. 

— Referring to a recent visit of the presid- 
ing elder the Madison Herald says: — Rev. R. 
M. Hoyle, presiding elder of the Mt. Airy 
district, preached two very able sermons in 
the Methodist church here Sunday morning 
and evening. He also conducted Quarterly 
conference in the church Monday morning at 
9:30. Rev. Mr. Hoyle is one of the ablest 
and most beloved Methodist preachers in the 
state and it is always a rare treat to have 
him preach in any community. He returned 
to his home in Mt. Airy Monday. 

— The building committee for Bethel church 
in the northwestern suburbs of the city of 
Greensboro, have adopted a plan and will be- 
gin the erection of a new church at an early 
day. Subscription lists are now being circu- 
lated, and work will begin just as soon as a suf- 
ficient amount is pledged to justify the under- 
taking. This church will be erected on a lot on 
the Battle Ground road, which was donated by 
Mr. S. L. Trogden. The church is very much 
needed and we earnestly commend the enter- 
prise to all Methodists jn and around the city. 

— A special from Hickory on the 3rd inst. 
says: — At a mass meeting of the men of the 
First Methodist church Sunday afternoon it 
was unanimously decided to support a mission- 
ary in a foreign field. The exact location has 
not as yet been decided upon. The Foreign 
Mission Board of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, will give a man in the near 
future for this purpose. The Methodist church 
is rapidly growing and is one of the most 
thriving congregations in the city. Rev. A. 
L. Stanford, the new pastor, is one of the best 
and most interesting ministers that has filled 
the pulpit in years. 

— Rev. Dr. Maveety, Secretary of the Freed- 
man's Aid Society, of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, filled the pulpit at West Market Street 
church on Sunday morning, preaching a most 
edifying and uplifting sermon on the whole 
subject of Home Missions, and especially the 
obligation of the white race to the black in 
America. The sermon was received with great 
appreciation by the large congregation which is 
always present at West Market Street. If our 
congregations co^d hear such utterances from 
leaders in the Methodist Episcopal church 
more frequently it would go far to remove the 
barriers for adjusting the relations between the 
two great bodies. 

—The church at North Wilkesboro has had 
a remarkable growth. Organized about twenty 
years ago, the congregation worshipped for a 
while in an old store house. In 1895 they built 
a neat little wooden house of worship with a 
parsonage of four or five rooms on an adjoining 
lot. Under the leadership of Rev. Parker 
Holmes, who is now serving his third year, they 
have erected a beautiful church at a cost of 
about $15,000, remodled their parsonage, mak- 
ing it an attractive and commodious home for 
the pastor and his family and are paying the 
pastor a salary of $1800. Meantime, the mem- 
bership has increased to something near 250, 
and the Sunday school is crawling up near the 
300 mark, The editor of the Advocate has 
watched the growth of this church from the be- 
ginning with no littfe interest. We know of no 
more loyal or appreciative congregation any- 
where. 

— A member of the Ladies' Aid Society of 
Central Methodist church, Albemarle, writes 
thus to the Enterprise of that town: — Recent- 
ly there was given to Central Methodist church 
of Albemarle a communion table as a memorial 
to the late Mrs. Julia G. Pemberton, for many 
years a faithful member of Central M. E. 
church. The table is a gift of Mrs. James P. 
Cook, nee Miss Maggie Norfleet, of Concord. 
Mrs. Cook prior to her marriage taught music 
in Albemarle for three years and boarded with 
Mrs. Pemberton. Mrs. Cook, writing in re- 
gard to Mrs. Pemberton, says that she loved 
her as her own mother, for she was so pure 
and good in every way. A check for the table 
was sent to Mrs. I. J. Caldwell who turned it 
over to the Ladies' Aid Society of Central 
Methodist church. The society and the church 
take this means of thanking Mrs. Cook for the 
gift and pray that God may ever bless her. 



February 12, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Seven 



Rttffin 

The pastor, Eev. L. P. Bogle, writes: — Ruf- 
fin church has pledged the support of a native 
missionary helper in China for this year. An 
every member campaign will begin this week 
to raise the entire amount for Conference 
collections. This charge means to come to the 
front. 



A Correction 

I see in the Minutes Farmington charge is 
not credited anything on Children's Home. I 
reported $60.00 and put receipts for the 
amount in with the report. I have duplicate of 
report showing the amount paid. I see thirty- 
one charges blank on Children's Home in the 
Minutes. I can't think any of them failed 
to take collections for this noble cause. The 
failure must be somewhere else as in mine and 
Bro. Carver's case. J. B. Tabor. 



A Mistake As to the Memorials 

In the report of the Committee on Memorials 
as published in the Minutes, the first item 
asking that members of boards be made mem- 
bers of the Annual Conference, is not correct. 
A memorial to that effect was presented and. 
referred to the committee. The committee dis- 
approved and reported instead item 4 as it 
appears in the present report in the Minutes 
that members of boards shall be allowed the 
privilege of the floor of the Conference on 
all matters pertaining to their work. The re- 
port in this form was adopted by the Con- 
ference. D. Atkins. 



Another Pounding 



Our High Shoals congregation has remem- 
bered us with a splendid pounding. They are 
very thoughtful people anyway. As they were 
too far from the parsonage to bring their gifts, 
they packed them in a big box and shipped 
them to us. It was quite a pleasant surprise. 
While opening the box and finding so many 
nice things for the pantry, the writer was 
made to say, this is so much like those High 
Shoals people. They don't do things by halves. 

Our work is moving on finely there. They 
have one of the best Sunday schools to be 
found anywhere. The Baraca and Philathea 
classes are just splendid. Brother J. W. Daniel 
is teacher of the Philathea class. He is a most 
excellent teacher. Brother J. W. Ramsey is in 
charge of the 3araca class and is right up to 
his business. Brother J. L. Clark is the su- 
perintendent of the Sunday school. He is a 
man of spiritual power, and manages his school 
well. E. N. Crowder, P. C. 



Lincoln Circuit 



We have now served more than two months 
of our fourth year on the Lincoln circuit. The 
work has been one of the most pleasant. When 
we arrived on Dec. 22, 1910, we found a good 
fire burning, and a well-filled pantry, but above 
all, in the parsonage and everywhere kind 
friends to receive us, and from that day to this 
I do not remember a time when the pantry did 
not contain some token of love from this dear 
people. Aside from this the circuit is now 
composed of four of what was once the weaker 
churches of a large circuit, and they are raising 
from twice to five times as much money for all 
purposes as they once did. 

The Lord has given us gracious revivals at 
all the churches. Our Sunday schools are doing 
fine for their opportunities, and preaching is 
well attended, not only by our own people but 
by all denominations in reach of us. And when 
our quadrennium expires, somebody will get 
an appointment to one of the nicest little 
charges in our Conference. 

Brethren, pray that we may be the instru- 
ment in God's hands of leading this people to 
even greater blessings, and that our last year 
may be our best. J. H. Robertson. 



Appeal for Young Men 

May I, through your columns, make an ap- 
peal for a number of young men who are 
studying for the ministry and are greatly in 
need of a little financial assistance ? I have on 
hand applications from students in the follow- 
ing schools and colleges: Trinity College, 



Rutherford College, Weaver College, Wofford 
College, Emory College, Reinhardt College, 
Emery and Henry College, Hiawassee College, 
Millsaps College, Southwestern University, and 
Clarendon College. 

Many of these students will not be able to 
carry on their work until June unless assis- 
tance can be secured. The Department of 
Ministerial Supply and Training is doing its 
best to help them, but its funds are exhausted. 
I want, therefore, to make an appeal to your 
readers in behalf of these men. Will not 
some pastor undertake to raise $50 or $100 to 
help some one student? Will not some liber- 
al-minded layman help us to. meet this urgent 
need? Contributions may be made to Dr. 
Stonewall Anderson, Secretary of Education, 
or to the undersigned. I shall be glad to give 
further information on request., . 

Hoping there may be a hearty response to 
this appeal, I am, Very sincere 1 ^, 

J. L. Cunninggim. 



A Brother in Bad Plight 

Through your excellent paper I desire to ex- 
press my gratitude to the brethren for their 
kind words approving my little article in the 
Advocate a few weeks ago on Organic Union. 
If I had time I would love to write each 
one a letter of thanks. I did not write it for 
popularity but because I thought it right to do 
so. As to why I did not have something to 
say when the subject was being . discussed 
at conference, some one would always be ahead 
of me and speak first. I was like the old negro 
whose mule was sick and who sought medical 
advice. The doctor told him to get a horn, put 
a big dose of calomel in it, put one end of the 
horn in the mule's mouth and the other end 
in his own mouth ; then blow the calomel down 
the mule's throat. A few days later the negro 
appeared before the doctor again; he looked 
very pale and weak as if he were just up from 
a long spell' of sickness. "Well, what is it, un- 
cle?" said the doctor. "O, dat mule, dat 
mule ! " ■ ' Well, ' ' said the doctor, ' ' did you get 
the horn and put the calomel in it?" "Yes, 
sir," said the negro. "Well, did you put 
one end of the horn in the mule's mouth and 
the other end in your own mouth?" I "I sho' 
did, boss." "Well, did you blow?" "Laud, 
mar's Doc! dat mule, he done blowed first." 
So about the time I would be ready to toot my 
little horn, some good brother would blow first. 
I confess the effects were about as disastrous 
on me mentally as the calomel was on the 
dear old colored brother physically. 
Fraternally yours, 

Jno. M. Price. 



Chadwick-Seversville, Charlotte 

The Seversville church has been built ten 
years, and until three years ago it lay sleeping 
like Rip Van Winkle, unconscious of the fact 
that the great Methodist church was plowing 
forward, building up greater structures and 
adding hundreds of names yearly to the army 
of the risen Lord. Three years ago the super- 
intendent of the Sunday school, who had been a 
charter member of the church and who had do- 
nated the land for the church and helped in 
many ways to build up the church, became dis- 
couraged at the lack of co-operation of the 
members in attending the Sunday school and 
one Sunday in August, 1910, the Sunday school 
bell failed to ring. The church became alarmed 
and men and women hurriedly came together 
and organized adult classes, and with Rev. J. 
L. Smith, then an, exhorter only, at the head, 
built up a school of about ninety scholars. At 
this time a Thursday night prayer meeting was 
organized in the church. A year later an Ep- 
worth League was organized- Up until Au- 
gust, 1913, the church, the prayer meeting and 
League were silently yet determinedly building 
up the young men and young ladies for active 
church workers and teachers in the Sunday 
school. The first of September every Sunday 
was made a "Special Day" advertising freely 
in the daily newspapers and allowing special 
solos, duets, quartettes, an orchestra was added 
and written invitations sent out, sixty to sev- 
enty a week until Jan. 25th, 175 scholars re- 
ported present. In October excavations were 
begun and the entire church was graded and 
brick walls erected, making a basement under 



the entire church building at a cost of $700. 
The Ladies' Aid assumes two-sevenths, the Ep- 
worth League two-sevenths and the Sunday 
school three-sevenths of the debt. The entire 
church has been repainted and recarpeted and 
with Rev. J. A. Sharpe at the pilot wheel we 
pray that many souls may find the light that 
will lighten their pathway until they reach that 
home "that is not builded with hands, eternal 
in the heavens. ' ' 

Seventy-eight members in church, with 1,632 
coming through the Sunday school door in elev- 
en Sundays since Annual Conference, and $82.- 
25 in collections, we claim to stand at the head 
of Sunday schools in Western North CaroHna 
Conference. C. W. Crowell, Supt. 



CAMPAIGN FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS 

REPORT TO FEBRUARY 10, 1914 
Asheville District 

Weaverville Ct, J. R. Warren 2 

North Asheville. W. E. Poovey 10 

Walnut, Z. V. Johnston 1 

Leicester, J. H. Green 10 

Sulphur Springs, T. A. Groce 3 

Black Mountain, R. E. Hunt 1 

27 

Charlotte District 

Dilworth and Big Springs, J. O. Ervin .. 5 

Waxhaw, W. P. Sandford 2 

Prospect Ct., J. C. Postelle 10 

17 

Greensboro District 

Uwharrie, C. E. Stedman 1 

Centenary, R. D. Sherrill 2 

Ramseur and Pranklinville, O. P. Ader . . 1 

Randolph Ct., A. S. Raper 1 

5 

Mt. Airy District 

Danbury, T. J. Folger % 

Ararat, J. W. Combs 5 

5% 

Morganton District 

Rutherfordton, Albert Sherrill 1 

Bald Creek, J. M. Barber 1 

Forest City, J. A. Bowles 9 

Morganton Ct., A. C. Swafford 1 

— 12 

North Wilkesboro District 

Sparta, T. J. Houck 1% 

Wilkesboro, A. P. Ratledge 1 

Helton, E. E. Tates 1 

Laurel Springs. S. W. Brown 1 

Boone, D. P. Waters 1 

5% 

Statesville District 

Catawba Ct., B. Wilson 1 

Broad Street, J. P. Kirk 1 

Mooresville Ct., E. Myers 4 

North Lenoir, J. C. Keever 1 

Rhodhiss. G. W. Fink 1 

Rock Springs, J. W. Hoyle 2% 

■ 10% 

Shelby District 

Ozark and W. Gaston ia, N. C. Williams .. 1 

Stanley Creek, E. N. Crowder % 

Polkville, J. P. Davis 1 

Lincoln Ct., J. H. Robertson 1 

Moores and Mt. Island, D. W. Brown . . 1 

Mt. Holly and Belmont. N. R. Richardson, 2 

South Fork, W. S. Cherry 1% 

8 

Salisbury District 

E. Spencer and N. Main, S. E. Richardson 11 

Salisbury Ct., E. M. Avett 1 

■ 12 

Waynesville District 

Hayesville. R. F. Wellons 3 

Franklin, E. E. Williamson 1 

Crestmont, J. M. Wacaster 1 

5 

Winston District 

Jackson Hill, C. C. Williams 5 

Davidson Ct., D. S. Richardson 3% 

High Point, E. and W., W. C. Jones 1 

9 

Grand total 

116% 

Mrs. J. C. Postelle sends in the full allotment for 
the Prospect circuit with the check for the full amount 
and says she will send more. Many other pastors 
could boost the campaign by appointing their wives 
to look after the work. We are somewhat behind 
the record of last year. Let next week's report show 
large increase in the - total figures. The people need 
the paper now. 

In the above report the following have secured the 
full allotment: Rev. W. E. Poovey, Rev. J. H. Green, 
Rev. J. C. Postelle, Rev. J. W. Combs, Rev. S. E. 
Richardson. 



Patriotism and statesmanship are not dead. 
In America we believe they are just coming in- 
to full realization. Our commercialism will 
yet give way to an idealism which will exalt 
mind rather than matter. 



Page Eight 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 12, 1914 



Department of Woman's Work 

Conducted by Mrs. W. R.Harris, Asheville, N. C. 



■* 



GIVE US OUR DAILY BREAD 
Luke 11:3 
Our daily bread, O Lord, we need it 
now. 

The wants of yesterday were all sup- 
plied, 

And Thou hast brought us safely on 

the way; 
But blessings past will not suffice; 
O feed us, Lord, today. 

We had the sunshine and the rain, 
When needed most throughout the sea- 
son <past, 

With showers abundant all the land 

was co.oled, 
When dry and parched with thirst; 
When cold and chill the sunlight 

warmed and cheered 
And gladdened all with its refulgent 

rays. 

So we were fed, but now, O Lord, 
Today give us our bread. 

Tomorrow has not come, we know not 

what our needs will be, 
But we are hungry now; 
Our souls are longing to be fed, 
To be enriched with grace to meet the 

day, 

Which now is dawning on us. 

And as the rosy light breaks in the 

east, 

And the new day comes in with dark 
to do, 

"O, Lord," we cry, lest we should faint 
upon the way, 
"O, give us bread today!" 

O, let us trust Thee, Lord, each day 

that comes 
That Thou wilt give us food. 
Thou knowest all and every blessing 

given, 

Is but an earnest of those yet to come. 
So may we follow on and rest our^ 
souls on Thee, 
And only ask for daily bread? 

Mrs. E. M. Anderson. 
Bradentown, Fla. 



MISSIONARY COUNCIL MEETING 

The annual session of the Woman's 
Missionary Council will convene in 
Fort Worth, Texas, on Wednesday, 
April 1st, 1914. Let us pray earnestly 
for the success of this meeting, asking 
God's presence there to direct in the 
deliberations of this body of workers 
and invoking His especial blessing up- 
on each woman met there to plan for 
the furtherance of His great work. 

Those desiring to subscribe to the 
Council Daily are asked to send their 
subscriptions before March 20th, to 
Mrs. A. L. Marshall, 810 Broadway, 
Nashville, Tenn. After this date they 
must be sent to Mr. W. F. Barnum, 
Business Manager, Fort Worth, Texas. 
The subscription price is twenty-five 
cents. 



Again we call attention to the fact 
that February 25th has been set apart 
as a day of prayer for Home Missions 
— a day when all the denominations 
will come together to pray for the 
spread of the Christian" religion in 
America. Bible study and continuous 
prayer are features of the program 
which can be secured from Mrs. Bes- 
sie Lipscomb, 810 Broadway, Nashville, 
Tenn. 



MEMORIAL TO MRS. A. E. PEASE 
A Tribute of Praise 

No true memorial of our dear Mrs. 
Pease can ever be expressed in words. 

The witness of her most gracious 
life wrought into other souls has prov- 
ed an inspiration to many for nobler 
deeds and higher spheres of useful- 
ness. Such living engravures shall 
speak this consecrated woman's meed 
of praise. 

Yet in common wth others who are 
bringing sheaves of love to lay upon 
her memory's altar, we of the Wo- 
man's Missionary Society of Cjfitral 
Church, Asheville, would bring our 
grateful tribute. 



First, we would give thanks, yea 
"sing praises to God most High," in 
that He favored this church and our 
people with her wonderful life of un- 
selfish, unobtrusive, consecrated ser- 
vice to God and humanity. 

Second, we would in a very peculiar 
and intimate sense, render thanksgiv- 
ing for the blessed leadership of this 
dear one to our missionary society 
from the day of its organization in 
1878, continuing as president for many 
years, and still leading as our chief 
spiritual adviser until the day of her 
translation. For out of this first rela- 
tion to womanhood's organized church- 
ly work, sprang varied boards of Chris- 
tian fellowship in service for the Mas- 
ter. 

Third, we would "praise the Lord" 
for the inestimable gift of this pure, 
sweet soul, irradiating our homes, sane, 
tifying our ideals, and pointing by ex- 
ample; the presentation of both soul 
and body as a living sacrifice unto 
Him who loved us and gave Himself 
for us. Such sacrifice Paul beseeches 
us by the very mercies of God to pre- 
sent as but a reasonable service. 

Therefore, as a well pleasing memo, 
rial of gratitude for such leadership we 
would, for our foreign department, ask 
that in future, the missionary who 
shall represent us in the field, in office 
she so long prayed and worked for, be 
known to us that the "Ann B. Pease 
Memorial Missionary." For the home 
department, we would asK tne estab- 
lishment of a suitable memorial in our 
church and Sunay school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. J. B. Ray, 
Mrs. F. A. Hull, 
Mrs. S. E. Dilworth, 
Committee. 



The following interesting account of 
an interdenominational missionary 
meeting held in St. James Lutheran 
Church, Concord, on the ninth day of 
January, the day set apart for prayer 
for foreign missions, has come to us 
from the third vice-president of the 
society of Central Methodist church, 
Mrs. W. D. Pemberton, and we gladly 
give it space, hoping that it may be 
an incentive to other societies who 
have not yet fallen into the plan of a 
united meeting: 

"The Woman's Missionary Prayer 
Service on Jan. 9th, was more large- 
ly attended than even the most san- 
guine had hoped it would be. It was 
a day of happy Christian fellowship, 
bringing the warm hand-clasp, the 
cheery greeting and a hearty unity of 
purpose. There were earnest prayers, 
songs of Zion and delightful vocal 
solos. Papers on 'India,' 'South Amer- 
ica,' and 'God's Call to Service," each 
of which was full of interest, filled the 
morning hour. The luncheon bounti- 
fully served, gave an hour for the com- 
mingling of old friends and the mak- 
ing of new ones. The afternoon hours 
were equally enjoyed. Carefully pre- 
pared papers on The Philippine Is- 
lands,' 'Medical Missions' and 'Chinese 
Medical Prescriptions,' were entertain- 
ing and instructive. Mrs. Werner 
spoke on Japan, giving much of its po- 
litical and religious history, the pres- 
ent attitude of the nation toward 
Christianity, and emphasizing the need 
of more workers to evangelize the 
country. 

The meeting was especially favored 
in having present Mrs. Mercer Blain, 
a Presbyterian missionary stationed at 
Kashing, China, who held the closest 
attention of her hearers as she told of 
her seventeen years' work among the 
people of that country. The day's les- 
sons no doubt aroused new gratitude 
for the blessings of the gospel and a 
deeper appreciation of the glorious 
truth that the condition of wo.uanhood 
in Christian lands is a heavtr. on 
earth compared to that in heathen 
countries. 



Suppose we women, 'queens' in our 
homes, were transported to Turkey, for 
instance, where few men believe a wo- 
man has a soul — and some say the 
only way a woman ever gets into heav- 
en is by catching hold of the tail of 
the beast as her husband rides in the 
gate. The unspeakable Turk! Should 
we not pray every day, 'Thy kingdom 
come' until we can sing, 'From all the 
dark places of earth's heathen races,' 
O see how the thick shadows fly?" 



WHO SHOULD STUDY MISSIONS? 

Every person who wants to be an in- 
telligent worker in the cause of mis- 
sions. No auxiliary — Adult, Young 
People or Junior — should be satisfied 
unless there is at least one group tak- 
ing two mission study courses each 
year, home or foreign. Many organiza- 
tions have these study groups by 
neighborhoods having as many as eight 
or ten in one society. 

Those unwilling to do intensive 
work may be enrolled in lecture 
classes. The lecture class presents a 
book at six or eight weekly gather- 
ings, often having a different speaker 
for each chapter. 

Why Study Missions? 

To overcome indifference and fur- 
nish a great objective to life. 

To guard against a false or incom- 
plete conception of missions. 

To give a true idea of the steward- 
ship of time, personality and money . 

To multiply trained leaders for our 
work everywhere. 

Best of all to inspire us to definite 
and effectual prayer. 

Study is the adequate method of 
saturating ourselves with the facts of 
the great present day needs. 

For Adult societies "The New Amer- 
ica," by Rev. and Mrs. L. C. Barnes, 
and "America, God's Melting Pot," by 
Mrs. L. G. Craig, are the new text- 
books for home mission classes this 
year, while for the foreign department 
we have "The King's Business," by 
Mrs. Raymond, and "Mexico Today," 
by Dr. G. B. Winton . 



meeting was held in Antwerp, Dr. 
Morrison and Bishop Lambuth being 
the principal speakers. 

Our party has grown to be so large 
that we decided to separate into two 
crowds. The Lapsley cannot accom- 
modate us all at one time on the up 
river trip. It would be more profit- 
able to spend the delay here in study 
of French, than at Liverpool. Conse- 
quently, Mr. and Mrs. Setzer, Mrs. 
Cleveland and myself will sail three 
weeks later than the first crowd. Dr. 
Morrison will accompany Bishop Lam- 
buth and the Methodist party to Lue- 
bo, and the Lapsley will return to Liv- 
erpool for us. The first party sailed 
from Antwerp, Saturday, November 8. 
They will reach Matodl about Novem- 
ber 28th, and Luebo perhaps three 
weeks later. Here the Methodist 
brethren will prepare for an overland 
journey to Wembo-Niama, where they 
will open up a new work upon a con- 
cession recently secured from the gov. 
ernment by Bishop Lambuth. 

Brussells, November 11th, 1913. 



Feeling sure that the friends of Bish- 
op W. R. Lambuth and his party of mis. 
sionaries who sailed from Philadelphia 
last July for Africa, will be interested 
in any news from them, we quote from 
a letter from Rev. R. F. Cleveland, one 
of the Presbyterian missionaries in 
the party: 

"When we left America, there were 
eight in the party, six Methodists 
(South) and four Presbyterians. While 
we were in London, D. L. Mumpower, 
M. D., and his wife and baby joined 
us. He was sent out by the Methodist 
Board. We have been spending the 
past two months here in Brussells in 
French study Last week Dr. Morri- 
son and Bishop Lambuth joined us 
here. They spent several days mak- 
ing plans negotiating with the govern- 
ment in regard to the work in the Con- 
go and delivering addresses in the Pro- 
testant churches in Brussells and vicin- 
ity. 

Since our arrival here the Belgium 
Protestant Missionary Society has 
been very cordial and hospitable 10 us . 
This society sent Miss Von Leancourt, 
a trained nurse to Luebo, where she 
is doing an excellent work. The same 
society will send out an industrial man 
with our party, who will also teach 
French in our schools at Luebo. This 
will be a great advantage to our Congo 
work, as French is almost necessary 
now. 

The Belgium society gave us a fare- 
well meeting last Thursday even- 
ing. All the Protestant' churches in 
Brussells and vicinity co-operated in 
the meeting and a large crowd was 
present. Addresses were delivered by 
Rev. E. F. Cook, D. D., Secretary 
of the Methodist Foreign Mission 
Board at Nashville, Tenn.; Rev. W. M. 
Morrison, D. D. ; Bishop Lambuth, D. 
L. Mumpower, M. D., and Mr. Dau- 
mery, the missionary who is sent out 
by the Society. All of these addresses 
were interpreted to the French audi- 
ence by Mr. Kennedy Anet and his 
son, Rev. Henri Anet, D. D. A similer 



A MESSAGE FROM THE W. M. S. 
! OF ELKIN M. E. CHURCH 

i By Mrs. John S. Roth 

I 

| Almost a year has gone since I have 
performed my duty as press superin- 
tendent and sent a message to our Wo- 
man's department, in our Advocate. 

During this year that has passed a 
number of us have been called upon to 
pass through deep shadows or sorrow 
and bereavement. Others have had 
seasons of rejoicing. 

There have been many delightful 
and profitable meetings of our society, 
but towards the close of the year we 
were all distressed to have to give up 
our much loved president, Mrs. R. G. 
Tuttle, who was transferred to another 
field. 

The great loss that we sustain, 
To Albemarle will be gain . 

In her all the Christian graces are 
personified, and being filled to over- 
flowing with missionary zeal, she has 
imparted it to others. Her mantle 
has fallen upon the shoulders of a 
close friend and neighbor, Mrs. Ma- 
son Lillard, and we feel sure the same 
high standard will be upheld in the 
society. Through Mr. and Mrs. Tut- 
tle we were in close touch with the 
foreign fields, he having a sister, Miss 
Lelia Tuttle, in China, and through 
their influence we are supporting a na- 
tive Bible woman, Maude McNeer, in 
China. She has done a good work 
there. The Sunday school is also sup. 
porting a Bible Woman, Alice Chat- 
ham, in Shanghai. 

The Juniors have the "Margaret 
Smith" Scholarship in Korea. This 
scholarship was taken several years 
ago under the leadership of Mrs. A. 
M. Smith. 

Owing to the fact that our Woman's 
Board has no work in Japan, some of 
the special donations from our society 
have to go through the General Board 
and of course cannot be credited to the 
woman's work. 

As soon as a consecrated Bible wo- 
man is available, my daughter, Miss 
Marjorie I. Roth, and I will assume her 
support. For several years we have 
wanted to have some special interest 
though small, in giving the gospel to 
others, and the inspiration received at 
the great Missionary Coference at 
Lake Junaluska last June, as well as 
the association with Rev. and Mrs. 
Tuttle, has helped us to a decision. 
We hope soon to know that "Our Jap- 
anese Marjorie" has been secured and 
is winning souls for Christ. 

Our society has had a most prosper- 
ous and profitable year. New officers 
have been elected and we hope that we 
may accomplish greater things during 
the coming year." 



OUR MARCHING ORDERS 

| Who— You 
| Where — All around 
GO | When — Now 

| What for — To preach 
| What — The gospel 
To whom — Everybody 



February 12, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Nine 



Epworth League Department 

Conducted by Miss A. Stanly Hall, Hickory, N. C. 



KISSING THE ROD 

0 heart of mine, we shouldn't worry so! 
What we've missed of calm we could- 
n't have, you know; 
What we've met of stormy pain and of 
sorrow's driving rain, 
We can better meet again, if it blow. 

We have erred in that dark hour we 
have known, 
When our tears fell with a shower, 
all alone; 

Were not shine and shadow blent as 
the gracious Master meant? 
Let us temper our content with His 
own. 

For we know, not every morrow can 
be sad; 

So forgetting all the trouble we have 

had, 

Let us fold away our tears, and put 
by our foolish fears, 
And through all the coming years, 
just be glad!— James Whitcomb 
Riley. 



STATESVILLE LEAGUE SOCIAL 

Through the courtesy of an invita- 
tion from Miss Kate Finley, third vice- 
president, and Mr. ,Ben L. Scronce, 
president of the Statesville League, 
we attended a social given in the 
church on last Friday night. 

Despite the unfavorable weather 
about sixty young people had gather- 
ed to spend a social hour together 
and to listen to the exercises of the 
evening. It was our privilege to talk 
to this interesting body of young peo- 
ple for a while upon the work of the 
League in general. During the even- 
ing there were several musical num- 
bers and a recitation. After the social 
hour during which refreshments were 
served. 

It is encouraging to note the bright 
future that seems to be before this 
League. For a few months past no 
regular meetings have treen held, but 
a re-ogranization has taken place and 
each member seems to be filled with 
the League spirit. We shall expect 
to hear great things from the States- 
ville League in the future. 

The president, Mr. Ben. L. Scronce, 
is a live wire when it comes to hand- 
ling young people. From what we 
learned during our short visit, each 
department is filled with an officer 
whose qualities for the special work 
to perform was carefully studied be- 
fore the election. 

We will expect to see in the Advo- 
cate from time to time a report of 
the work of this League. We sin- 
cerely hope that other Leagues in the 
district will catch the spirit of activ- 
ity from Statesville. We have a call 
to the Statesville district League 
which will appear in these columns 
at an early date. It is the earnest 
desire of the district secretary that 
the Statesville district lead all others 
at the Assembly meeting next summer. 

A. W. Cline, 
District Sec. Statesville Dist. 



ARCTIC TRAVEL— A PARABLE 

Peary the Arctic explorer, on one 
occasion, when he supposed that he 
was traveling poleward at the rate of 
ten miles a day, found that the ice 
floe on which he was moving was it- 
self drifting toward the equator at 
the rate of twelve miles a day. He 
was in fact being borne backward at 
the rate of two miles a day. He would 
not have discovered it if he had not 
looked skyward to take his bearings. 

Everything may depend upon our 
method of reckoning progress and up- 
on our heavenly gaze. He who looks 
downward or only on the earthly lev- 
el may even suppose that he is going 
forward, when he is in reality going 
backward; but he who keeps his eye 
on God and takes his reckoning by 



celestial standards is sure of his posi- 
tion and has a safe guide. On the 
worldly level there are no perfect and 
absoutely reliable landmarks. Our 
observations and experiences need to 
be corrected by celestial interpreta- 
tions. — Missionary Review 



EPWORTH LEAGUE SERVICE FUR- 
NISHED BY THE MISSIONARY 
VOICE 

BLANCHE WYATT 

Many Epworth Leagues are unable 
for various reasons to have a mission 
study meeting during the week; but 
every chapter can conduct one by pre- 
senting the needs, the religions, the 
family life, etc., to the chapter at the 
devotional service. One chapter tried 
this plan for a month. A stereoptican 
lecture was given on Korea. A dis- 
cussion of Buddha with an outline of 
Korea commercially, geographically, 
and politically made up the next ser- 
vice. Then from the Voice were clip- 
ped reports on the work done in Ko- 
rea as reported during the entire year 
by the magazine. Mr. Deal's report 
on the industrial work led. The num- 
ber of patients treated, the medicine 
given out, and the hospitial report 
came next. The evangelist's report 
followed, being coupled with a letter 
from a native preacher. A story of 
the marriages and burials was given. 
Then the report of the educational 
wark, followed by an appeal for a 
music teacher and other assistants in 
the kindergarten was given. All 
these, from the Voice, gave a com- 
plete setting of the things accomplish- 
ed and the things needed, and showed 
to some attendants that mission work 
means more than just preaching to the 
people. It was thrilling to have Mr. 
Ryang's story retold; how even the 
location of Korea made it almost im- 
possible to build up a nation of them- 
selves and to control their own land. 
The last service was a pageant, "The 
Broken Needle," when the Leaguers 
wore the native costume; a Korean 
woman was treated by a medicine 
man; the advice of the missionary; 
a physician healed her; the part of the 
played, and the joy of the natives. 



EXCHANGE YOUR SILENT PIANO 
FOR ONE THAT ALL CAN PLAY 

One of the most popular features 
of the N. C. Christian Advocate Piano 
Club is that by which you can ex- 
change your silent piano for a self- 
player piano that every member of 
your family, old and young, can play. 
The self-player is unquestionably the 
greatest musical instrument of the 
age, for it opens wide the door to the 
entire world of musical composition. 

The Reverend Len G-. Broughton, 
D. D., formerly of Atlanta, now pastor 
of the celebrated Christ church, Lon- 
don, writing to the managers of the 
Club, says: — "We have one of your 
Farrand Cecilian Player Pianos, and 
are most delighted with it. All who 
have ever heard it are in an agree- 
ment that it is one of the very best 
combinations that has ever been put 
on the market. Persons desiring such 
an instrument will certainly do well 
to examine yours, and if they will 
only give it a trial, I feel sure that 
they will try no further. Fraternally 
yours, Len G. Broughton." 

Write for your copy of the beau- 
tifully illustrated Club catalogue and 
see how easy it will be for you to 
secure a spendid piano or player piano 
for your home. Address the Mana- 
gers, Ludden and Bates, N. C. Chris- 
tian Advocate Piano Club Dept., At- 
lanta, Ga. 



i 

i Life is short, and we never have too 
' much time for gladdening the hearts of 
those who are traveling the dark jour- 
ney with us. Oh, be swift to love, make 
haste to be kind! — Amiel's Journal. 



Increase Your Yield 




By using the F. & J. Bemis Transplanter. 
DO THE WORK RIGHT THIS YEAR 

Set your plants with this machine and see them start growing quicker and bring you larg-er yield, 
better quality and greater money returns. 

In setting plants by hand you thrust a stake into the earth to make a hole, put the plant in and 
souse some water on it. What Is the result? The tender root fibers are all doubled up, are packed in 
a casing or hard ballot earth which the sun bakes and the plant is Injured and perhaps killed by sun 
burn. If it dot s happen to live it starts growing slowly for it takes time for the tender root fibers to 
force their way through the casing- of hard sun baked earth. Results— delay in the plant getting a good 
start and a crop not uniform in growth and quality. 

The F. & J. Bemis Transplanter by means of a plow or furrow opener opens the earth to receive 
the plant and the mechanical watering device deposits just the right amount of water around the roots 
of the plant, slushing and spreading them out. The pressure or covering plates are so shaped that they 
press the loose soil firmly around the watered roots and leave the soil loose about the stem of the plant. 
Results— no injury to the roots, no baking of the ground, no burning of the plant, growth starts at once 
and you get stronger and better plants of uniform growth and better quality. 

MACHINE SETTING IS EQUAL TO CULTIVATING THE FIELD ONCE. 

Actual tests show that 95 per cent of the plants set with the F. & J. Bemis Transplanter live and 
thrive. They can be set out whenever they are ready regardless of weather conditions. Think of the 
great advantage of this. Think also of the labor saving feature. From three to five acres can be set 
out easily in a day. You get a larger yield, better quality and more mcney with less work. 

The F. 4 J. Bemis is built on the "Quality First" plan,— strong, of the best materials obtainable, 
not complicated and it will last a life time with proper care. Its cost is saved the fit st year. The fol- 
lowing can be furnished if wanted— fertilizer, Irish potato and nursery planting attach ments. 

Write to the Madison Plow Company, Manufacturers, Madison, Wisconsin, or W. B. Leonard, 
General Representative for the East and South, Elmira, New York, for special descriptive pamphlets, 
or write or call upon any of the following representative dealers who sell and warrant this popular 
machine: 



B E. Brewer * Co., Rocky Mount, N. 0. 



I . Harvey & Sons Co., KlnstOD, N.C. 
Illnnant-Rlersob Co., Wilson, N. 0. 
E. C. MoLamb, Keener ,N. 0. 
S teTens P ..V I. Co., Smlthfleld, N. 
K. H.Elmore, Melfa, V,. 

Dlzon Brothers Mercantile Co., Snow mil, N. 0. 
llollwood Feed * Supply Co., Ilallwood, Va. 



nart & Hartley, Greenville, N.C. 

E. K. Jobnjon, Currituck C. II ., N. 0. 

Smith Hard ware Co., Goldsboro, N. 0. 
J. S. Woolen, Lb Grange, N.C. 
Martin Hall, Oak Hall, Va. 
1. T. Edgerton & Brother, Kenlv, N. C. 
Geo. M. nolley, Coleraine, N. C. 



Why bake or roast blindly 

The Boss saves fuel. It 
is fully asbestos lined, 
heats in 2 minutes, 
bakesuuiformly. Pat- 
ented glass door guar- 
anteed not to break 
from heat. Genuine 
stamped BOSS. 



The glass door elimi- 
nates guesswork and 
worry. Without opening it 
you can see your bakings 
brown perfectly— never burn- 
ing or chilling them. No heat 
is wasted, no time lost. 



Try the BOSS OVEN 30 days 

Order a "Boss" from your dealer today. Test it 80 days. 
Your money rerfunded immediatelj if not satisfactory. 
Quaranteedto work on onj good oil, gasoline 
or gas stove. 
Write now for booklet and dealers' name 
THE HUENEFELD COMPANY 
5700 Valley St., Cincinnati, O. 



3 Sizes 

Sold by dealers everywhere 

If your dealer cannot supply you, write us. 



Big Boston 

lettuce 



SEED FREE 




For forty-six years we have been growing pure, virile 
pedigreed seed out here ou our Hycc Seed Farm and sell- 
ing fresh from our Seed House on the farm to the farmer 
and gardener. Our friends and customers, who cover the 
South, know the great difference between Slate's Seed and 
musty city warehouse seed— but we want you to know it 
too. As a test we offer a Free Packet of our Big Boston 
Lettuce — will you accept it? 

Simply write a post card— NOW 

SLATE SEED COMPANY, 
Box 13, South Boston, Va. 



M 20.00HHUOES 

THOMAS INDIVIDUAL < &SP-^ 
COMMUNION SERVICE 



Noiseless, dust-proof, self-collecting, saves % 
cost other services. Uses shallow glass — no 
tipping of head. Our Special Introductory 
Offer makes purchase easy. Outfits on trial 
— state number of communicants, 
Thomas Communion Service Co., Box 147 Lima, Ohio 



The Newest Styles of Jewelry 

WATCH E8, STERLING SILVER 
AND PLATED WARE 

Clocks that will run and a large assort - 
ment cf Fine Pocket Books, Cut Glass- 
ware and Ornaments. We are the eld- 
est leading arm in the city. Everything 
Is guaranteed. 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO 

LEADING JEWELERS 



Howard's Hardy Shrubs" 
for Home Planting 



^^^^^^^ These twelve shrubs will 
give flowers from spring to fall, and 
every year add to the beauty of your 
home: Hydrangea, Hills of Snow; 
Lilac, purple; Lilac, white; Blue 
Spirea; Barberry, purple -leaf, and 
Thunbergii, white; Bush Honey- 
suckle, Merrowii, white; Salt Bush, 
cottony down; four Spireas, Anthony 
Waterer, crimson; Thunbergii, white; 
Douglasii, pink; Van Houttei, white. 
Twelve Shrubs for $3, 
Delivered to Your Door 
Send for our new catalogue of Orna- 
mental Trees, Shrubs, Roses, Fruits of 
all kinds. We sell direct to you — and 
every plant or tree is first-quality stock. 

HOWARD NURSERY CO., Box 215, STOVALL, N. C. 



AGENTS SI' 



docb, • man or woman, one rsps&is 
, a good salary, in svery community 
iro no! represented. SUM MFG. CO., 
&f Writs Ui J&fi~8l5 DEAN BL06L, SOUTH BEND. INDIANA 



Page Ten 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 12, 1911 



Our Children's Home Department 

Conducted by Walter Thompson, Superintendent 



RECEIVED ON FIFTH SUNDAY COL- 
LECTIONS, WEEK ENDING 
FEB. 7, 1914 

Chas. Osborne, S. Main St., High 
Point, $12.01. 



RECEIVED ON TEN PER CENT, 
ETC. 

Rev. J. T. Ratledge, Advance Ct., 
$6.00; H. A. Scott. Concord Ct., Mt. 
Olivet church. $7.00; Rev. P. H. Brit, 
tain, Iredell Ct, $22.67; J. S. Bell, 
Elkin, $25.00; Chas. Bobbitt, General 
Support, $1.00; Cash from Dairy, $2.00. 
Total, $63.67. 



RECEIVED ON BUILDING FUND 
J. H. West, Agent 

Paid On Subscriptions: — Salisbury: 
C. S. Morris, $1.00; W. T. Burke, 
$1.00. Hickory: W. A. Rudasill, 
Hickory S. S., $55.00. High Point: 
Miss Lillian Massey, Peacock Phila- 
thea class, $10.00. Weaverville: J. H. 
West, $5.00. Brevard: T. H. Gallo- 
way, $10.00; W. E. Breese, $5.00. 
Asheville: E. B. Atkinson, $6.25. To- 
tal, $93.25. 

Cash Collections: — Asheville: H. A. 
Dunham, $20.00. Brevard: W. H. Al- 
lison, $10.00; Dr. Goode Cheatham, 
$5.00; Mrs. B. T. Egerton, $5.00; 
Miss Julia A. Trowbridge, $5.00; Miss 
Alma Trowbridge, $5.00; Mrs. R. C. 
Galloway, $5.00; Mrs. C. A. Shuford, 
$2.50; Miss Kate Simmons, $1.00; 
Mrs. J. Norton, $1.00; J. W. Mc- 
Minn, $5.00; Cash basket collections, 
$3.00. Hendersonville: W. L. Hef- 
ner, $5.00. Total, $72.50. 



DONATIONS 

Ladies M. S., West End, Winston, 
one box handkerchiefs ; Randleman La- 
dies' Aid Society, two boxes jelly, pre- 
serves, etc.; one box clothing, etc. 



A NOTE OF APPRECIATION 

Having received so many letters of 
sympathy from the brethren and some 
of the sisters, after the death of our 
little boy Weber, we take this meth- 
od of answering, and we hope each 
one that has written us will accept this 
as an answer. It Is not that we do 
not 'appreciate these letters, for we do, 
but in our confusion we misplaced a 
number of them and are not able to 
answer directly. 

Pray for us that we may so live that 
we may, when life's work is done, go 
to him. Yours in grief, 

A. G. Loftin and family. 



THE EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE 
OF THE M. E. CHURCH, SOUTH, 
FEB. 26-27, NASHVILLE, 
TETJN. 

1. The Conference will be held* in 
the Sunday school room of McKendree 
church. 

2. It will open promptly iat 9 o'clock, 
Thursday the 26th. 

3. The first morning session will 
be devoted to organization, and to a 
discussion of the general topic, "The 
Junior College." 

4. The afternoon session will be 
devoted to a discussion of the general 
topic, "Admission to College." 

5. The first evening session will 
be devoted to the Round Table dis- 
cussions. 

6. The second morning session will 
be devoted to a discussion of the 
"Requirements for Graduation." 

7. The second afternoon session 
will be devoted to ia discussion of the 
topics, "The Teaching Force" and 
"Income Requirements." 

Special railroad rates to Nashville 
may be secured from all points in and 
out of the State of Tennessee. The 
Conference is open to all educational 
workers of the M. E. Church, South. 

It would be well to secure hotel ac- 
commodations in advance, as Nash- 
ville will probably be crowded with 



visitors at that time. The following 
are some of the hotels: v r 

Hormitage Hotel, Sixth Avenue and 
Union St., European plan; rates, $2.00 
to $3.50 per day. Private baths with 
all rooms^ 

Maxwell House, Church St. and 
Fourth Ave. N. European plan; $1.00 
to $2.50 per day without bath; $2.00 
to $3.50 with bath. 

Savoy Hotel, Seventh Ave., between 
Church and Broad Sts. European 
plan. $1.50 per day without bath; 
$2.00 with bath. 

Duncan Hotel, Fourth Ave. and Ce- 
dar St. American plan. $3.00 and 
up per day without bath; $3.50 and 
up per day with bath. 

Tulane Hotel, Church St. and 
Eighth Ave N. American planjn$<i.00 
to $2.50 per day without bath;'' $3.00 
per day with bath. - 



STATE ANTI-SALOON CODE 

To the Anti-Saloon League Forces of 
North Carolina : 

On January 29, 1913, the' Executive 
Committee of the North Carolina Anti- 
Saloon League met and adopted the 
following resolutions: 

Whereas 1 ; We believe that a Virgin- 
ian has no more right to sell liquor in 
North Carolina than, a North, Caroli- 
nian, and that it will help'the State- 
wide prohibition fight in Virginia to 
prohibit sales in this State by Virgin- 
ians; and, 

Whereas, We believe that it is the 
duty of the State to act as a guardian 
for the children and mothers of the 
State and for the generations to come, 
and that under this guardianship the 
State ought to do its utmost to stop 
fathers from drinking; and, 

Whereas, The Baptist State Conven- 
tion, the Conferences of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, and other 
churches in the State Ijave memorial- 
ized the General Assembly of 1915 to 
pass an act prohibiting the delivery of 
liquor within the State; and, 

Whereas, The reports coming to us 
from the eight counties where such 
prohibitory laws now operate are that 
the law is a success; and, 

Whereas, Evidence comes to us to 
show that the Mind tigers and liquor 
drinkers have joined hands to destroy 
the effectiveness of the Search and Sei- 
zure Law; and, y, ] v 

Whereas, There is a great demand 
from all over the State for this legis- 
lation; now, therefore, be it resolved 
by the Executive Committee of the 
North Carolina Anti-Saloon League^ 

1. That we, in harmony with the 
action of the churches above referred 
to, declare ourselves in favor of the 
passage of an act by the next'" Gen- 
eral Assembly to prohibit the deWrrery 
of liquor in our State for beverage 
purposes; that we request the citizens 
of the State in every voting precinctito 
call upon their candidates for the Gen- 
eral Assembly to declare themselves 
on this question, and w©> urge the 
Christian voters to see to it that such 
members of the General Assembly are 
elected as will stand for this meas- 
ure. 

2. That we instruct our Superinten. 
dent to so organize the State and 
carry this campaign into all the coun- 
ties as that we shall be assured of 
the passage of this measure by the 
next General Assembly. 

3. That we endorse the action of 
the Central Committee taken on De- 
cember 31, 1913, calling fbr'a fund of 
$15,000 per year for the next five years 
to carry on our prohibition work." 

In order that these resolutions may 
toe carried out, I advise tfhat the 
pastors and a few laymen who favor 
these resolutions in eaclf county get 
together within the next 0 twenty days 
in an informal meeting and then and 
there select one man a!s a chairman of 
that county for this campaign, and get 
his agreement to act in this ^capacity, 
giving him full assurance of the sup- 




An Exceptional Bible Offer 

Endorsed by Representatives of all Denominations 

THE 1911 BIBLE 

Being the old familiar Authorized Version, 
carefully amended by American scholars in 
the light of the latest modern scholarship. 

Not a Revision 

Only such passages as are recognized by all scholars 
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port of the pastors and Christian citi- 
zens. As soon as this is done communi- 
cate with this office, giving the name 
and address of the chairman selected 
for the county and any other informa- 
tion that may be helpful. 

The raising of the fund of $15,000 
is vital to this campaign and if each 
church, through its pastor, lay leader, 
Sunday school superintendent, board 
of stewards or board of deacons, will 
take up this matter and send to the 
North Carolina Anti-Saloon League a 
contribution equal to one per cent, of 
the amount they pay their pastor, it 
will greatly help in raising this fund, 
and if this can be done right away it 
will enable the Anti-Saloon League to 
send an organizer into any county 
where his services may be needed. But 
individuals need not wait for the 
church collections. If you are inter- 
ested, my brother, my sister, and want 
to take stock in the passage of this 



law, send us your check for any 
amount from $1.00 to $100.00. 

I shall be glad to receive suggestions 
from anyone who feels that he can 
help us in this matter. 

Tours for prohibition that will pro- 
hibit. R. L. Davis, 
Supt. N. C. Anti-Saloon League. 

Raleigh, N. C . 



The seed dies, but the harvest lives. 
Sacrifice is always fruitful, and there 
is nothing fruitful else. Out of the 
suffering comes the serious mind; out 
of the salvation, the grateful heart; 
out of the endurance, the fortitude; 
out of the deliverance, the faith. — 
Frederic W. Farrar. 



I have a dozen copies Peloubet's 
Notes on Sunday School Lessons 
(1914) at 75c each and carriage, while 
they last. Rev. L. P. Bogle, Ruffln, 
N. C. 



February 12, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Eleven 




McC LURE— Miss Hattie McClure, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Mc- 
Clure, at the early age of 23 years de- 
parted this life January 10, 1914, and 
went to be with her Lord in glory. 
When twelve years of age she joined 
Trinity Methodist church near Char- 
lotte. It was from this samo church 
she was buried amid a large con- 
course of sorrowing loved ones 
and friends. She had attended for 
some time the Southern Industrial 
Institute and had spent part of one 
year at Davenport Female College 
when her health failed and she had 
to give up school. She made a heroic 
fight against the dread disease tuber- 
culosis, but without avail. Hers was 
a singularly pure and beautiful life. 
Gentle and kind and thoughtful, she 
was a general favorite. Her desire 
and purpose was to become a foreign 
missionary, but God had some better 
thing for her. He wanted her to go 
and be with him, and she was con- 
tent to go. The family has been doub- 
ly bereaved, because her brother who 
was finishing his course at a medical 
college was taken also, just a few 
weeks before. But for their faith in 
God they would be crushed, but as 
children of God where they cannot 
see they trust. We rejoice that their 
God will not fail them in this time 
of sore need, but will give them the 
Holy Spirit who will sustain and com- 
fort them with His own gracious pres- 
ence. J. A. Baldwin. 



KESTLER — Henry Roland Kestler 
was born Jnly 18th, 1841, and died 
January 28th, 1914, being 72 years, 6 
months and 10 days old. 

He was a soldier of the Confederate 
army throughout the Civil War, serv- 
ing as a member of the Rowan artil- 
lery, a kind Providence having shield- 
ed him from injury through the en- 
tire war. 

Under Dr. Creasy's ministry he 
joined Providence Methodist church 
and has served continuously since as 
an official. He was of a cheerful dis- 
position, living above reproach. He 
was true to his church and pastor, a 
jgood neighbor, an affectionate hus- 
band and father. 

The funeral was very largely at- 
tended. He leavee a wife and one 
son and one daughter. May the Lord 
comfort the bereaved. 

E. M. Avett, Pastor. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, the removal of Mrs. Mollie 
Crump from our midst to her heaven- 
ly home has left a vacancy in our 
Sunday school, and in the woman's 
class of which she was a devoted mem- 
ber, and whereas she was a regular 
attendant, whose happy, cheerful face 
was an inspiration to us, therefore 
resolved: 

First, that we, the members of the 
Wesley Adult Bible Class of Morven 
Sunday school mourn the loss of our 
sister, but feel assured that she now 
enjoys supreme happiness in the pres- 
ence of her Savior, of whom she so 
eagerly sought to learn. 

Second, that in the death of Mrs. 
Crump the Methodist church, as well 
as the Sunday school, has lost a con- 
secrated member — one who by her 
sweet Christian character and kind 
disposition won the love and esteem of 
the community. 

Third, that we tender our deepest 
sympathy to the relatives of the de- 
ceased. 

Fourth, that these resolutions be 
inscribed upon the minutes of our class 
and copies be furnished the town paper 
and the N. C. Christian Advocate for 
publication. 

Mrs. M. H. Lowery, 
Miss M. E. Walsh, 
Miss A. M. Vest, 

Committee. 



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RESOLUTIONS OF BALM GROVE 
SUNDAY SCHOOL 

The Balm Grove Sunday school of 
West Asheville, N. C, wishes to ex- 
press the sorrow of the members on 
account of the death of Constance 
Mitchell, January 5th, 1914. 

Whereas, Constance was a sweet- 
spirited, lovabJe young girl, devoted 
to her family, kind to all, faithful to 
her Sunday school and Junior League 
duties, trustful in her love to God and 
testified as to her faith before she 
died. 

Therefore, be it resolved, that our 
Sunday school has lost a valued mem- 
ber and one who gave promise of a 
life of usefulness in the service of 
the Lord. 

Resolved, that we extend to the be- 
reaved family our heartfelt sympathy 
and pray God to. strengthen and com- 
fort each sorrowing heart. 

Terrie E. Buttrick, 
Mabel Kerr, 
John Machin, 

Committee. 



MEASE — J. B. Mease was born in 
Haywood county, N. €., April 21, 1842. 
He was married to Miss Lou M. Smath- 
ers of the same county in 1868. To 
this union were born twelve children. 

He professed religion in 1886 and 



joined the M. E. Church, South, at 
Hayesville, N. C, Clay county. He 
leaves - a wife and eight children to 
mournf his loss. 

Brother Mease was a good man and 
will be missed in his home and by 
his church and by his neighbors. He 
died January 22nd, 1914. The funeral 
was conducted by his pastor at the 
old Methodist church. The large at- 
tendance proved that he was greatly 
loved. 

His life will be missed by many, 
but our loss is his eternal gain. "Well 
done, thou good and faithful servant." 

The bereaved have the sympathy of 
all who know them. 

R. F. Wellons, P. C. 



Take courage and turn your troubles 
which are , without remedy into ma- 
terial for spiritual progress. Often 
turn to our, Lord, who is watching 
you, poor, frail, little being as you 
are, amid your labors and distractions. 
He sends you help. — Francis de Sales. 

As soon as we lay ourselves entirely 
at his feet, we have enough light given 
us to guide our own steps, as the 
f oot soldier, who hears nothing of the 
councils that determine the course of 
the great battle he is in, hears plainly 
enough the word of command which he 
must himself obey. — George Eliot. 



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Page Twelve 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 12, 1914 



The Sunday School 
Lesson 



FIRST QUARTER— LESSON VII — 
FEBRUARY 15 ,1914 



Christ's Hatred of Shams 
Luke 11:37-54 



Golden Text — Be not deceived; God 
is not mocked. Gal. 6:7. 

The Things Jesus Omitted 

That oft-quoted word of Robert Lou- 
is Stevenson in praise of the man who 
had learned how to omit comes to mind 
in the study of Jesus's experience in 
dining wth the scrupulous Pharisee. 
You know a great deal about a man if 
you know what he leaves undone. 

A man may fill his life full of ner- 
vous activity in the attempt to be loyal 
to things not worth while. A man may 
waste the substance of his life not only 
in riotous living, but also in minute 
scrupulosities. Professor Alexander 
Bruce once pointed out that the men 
entirely occupied with petty details of 
morals are often the very men who 
fail where the great moral issues are 
concerned. A fierce faithfulness to mi- 
croscopic distinctions and an actual 
looseness about large matters of right 
and wrong may easily be found to- 
gether. 

Jesus simply refused to get lost in 
the small details of life. He saw life 
in large moral perspective and based 
His thought and activity on this wide 
and adequate vision. There were a 
thousand petty Jewish observances 
which had no significance for Him. We 
may even go so far as to say that when 
they get in the way of more significant 
matters these observances were abso- 
lutely repulsive to Him. The best He 
could say for them when they had 
some real value if rightly used is 
embodied in the phrase, "These also 
ought ye to have done and not to have 
left the other undone." The whole 
ministry of Jesus was a protest against 
the reign of the petty. He repudiated 
the lordship of the unessential. He 
knew how in a perfectly royal way to 
pass over the things which did not 
matter. 

He clearly saw the difference be- 
tween cleanness of hands and clean- 
ness of soul, and He saw the fatal folly 
of being so interested in clean hands 
that ablutions were observed when 
they were quite unnecessary, while all 
the time the need of the soul was for- 
gotten. 

The Things Which Jesus Emphasized 

In the bays and inlets of the world 
there are two kinds of signals. One 
variety tells of dangers to be avoided. 
The other tells of where the safe 
channels may be found. In the matter 
of life and its experiences there are 
two kinds of signals. One tells what 
to avoid. The other tells what to do. 

Now both of these varieties of mor- 
al guidance are necessary, but quite 
the most important and significant sig- 
nals in life, however it may be on the 
water, are those which tell us what to 
do. It is better to be occupied with 
right activity than to spend one's time 
trying to avoid wrong activity. There 
is a strategy about the word "do" 
which is never possessed by the word 
"don'.t" The reformer is necessary, 
but the constructive statesman does a 
profounder work. 

Now, what were the things which 
Jesus emphasized? The reply is that 
He laid constant stress on certain mo- 
tives and certain activities. It was not 
Jesus who said, "Conduct is three 
fourths of life." The fact of the matter 
is that the ethical importance of con- 
duct entirely depends on whether it ex- 
presses the inner meaning of the life 
of the man. The deep question is not 
just what a man does. It has to do 
with what he means by what he does. 
A sincere, true heart, an inner life 
where truth and goodness reign was 
the fundamental matter with Jesus. 
Motives determine the value of con- 
duct and Jesus incessantly pressed 




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down to the secret places of the soul 
where motives are born. 

There are two kinds of religious ac- 
tivity. One variety has drect moral 
results. The other is significant large- 
ly for its symbolic value. It was the 
activity which bore direct and practical 
fruit which Jesus emphasized. Broth- 
erly deeds counted for more than rit- 
ual. Jesus did not object to symbol 
if the thing symbolized was retained, 
but He knew that the constant danger 
of symbolism is that you will be so 
loyal to the sign that you will forget 
the thing signified. The tragedy of the 
religions of the world is the tendency 
of ritual to take the place of right liv- 
ing. 

The Things the Jewish Leaders 
Omitted 

"Winston Churchill has done much ef- 
fective and illuminating work as a wri- 
ter of historical novels. He has been 
successful, too, as a delineator of pres- 
ent political conditions and the battles 
of reform. Recently he has attempted 
an analysis of ecclesiastical condi- 
tions as these have to do with the 
Church's endeavor to be an interpreter 
and a guide in respect of the deepest 
things of life. The telling phrase 
which he has taken as the title of his 
last book is The Inside of the Cup. He 
applies words Jesus spoke of the Phari- 
sees to the conditions of the present- 
day Church. Whatever one may think 
of his remedies no one can doubt the 
Significance of his diagnosis. 

The men of whom Jesus spoke were 
quite without moral perspective. They 
omitted to take account of the inner 
life. They forgot the fundamental 
matters of honesty and brotherhood. 
In the most careless fashion in the 
world they passed by the deepest 
things of life. They looked after the 
part of the cup men could see and ig- 
nored the necessity of cleaning the 
part from which men drank. If the eye 
was pleased they were quite careless 
about the matter of admitting poison 
through the lips. What they caused to 
look like a field of growing things was 
really a cemetery full of dead men's 
bones. When a man thought he was in 
a corn field he was really in a grave- 
yard. Those Jewish leaders cared a 
great deal more about what they seem- 
ed to be than what they were. Appear- 
ance, and not reality, was their stan- 
dard. They were willing to ignore the 
reality if the appearance could be kept. 

Some of them were teachers, who 
had a good deal of expert knowledge 
regarding the past. They could deal 
with a dead moral issue adequately, 
but a living issue found them all con- 
fused . Because a man can analyze the 
past it does not follow that he can 
deal wisely with the present. Guizot 
found it easier to write a History of 
Civilization than to deal effectively 
with the actual conditions in the 



France of his own life. Out of a 
scholar's makeup the things which are 
required for dependable leadership are 
sometimes omitted. Jesus found it so 
with the iscribes. 

On the whole, Jewish leaders were 
characterized by what amounted to 
positive genius for ignoring the mat- 
ters of deepest import and most far- 
reaching significance. 

What the Jewish Leaders Emphasized 

The praye rmachine of a Buddhist is 
an effective illustration of a custom 
which emphasizes religion in such a 
fashion that all moral quality has de- 
parted from it. Form has taken the 
place of substance. The symbol has 
taken the place of the thing for which 
it stood. When religion becomes a 
ritual and nothing more the brains 
have departed from it. Certain motions 
are a substitute for thougnt. When re- 
ligion becomes a ritual and nothing 
more the conscience has departed from 
it. The observance of the formula has 
taken the place of the keeping of the 
moral law. When reigion becomes * 
ritual and nothing more the heart has 
gone from it. The buzzing of the ma- 
chinery of worship has taken the place 
of the circulation of the blood of de- 
votion. The body of religion is pre- 
served, but the soul has fled. 

To such an estate had religion fall- 
en under the leadership of the Phari- 
sees and the scribes. Moral distinc- 
tions invisible to the naked eye had 
taken the place of the great matters of 
right and wrong. The garment of re- 
ligion was considered more important 
than the man who wore the garment. 
The change wrought by religion was 
the change of a suit of clothing and not 
a changed heart. Sight was consider- 
ed more important than insight. Pros- 
perity on the surface was considered 
more significant than reality in the 
depth of the life. Religion had become 
a matter of millinery. It had ceased 
to be a matter of feeling and enlarg- 
ing and growing life. The leaders 
in religion were experts in superficial- 
ity; masters of the external and spec- 
ialists in the unimportant. 

They were like a man who would 
find a man wounded and dying and try 
to comfort him by offering him a new 
suit of clothes. They were men who 
did artificial things because they 
themselves were artificial. They had 
tampered with the realities of life un- 
til they had become fundamentally un- 
real. They had always understood the 
wrong words and emphasized the 
wrong deeds. They were lost in de- 
tails, buried in symbols whose signifi- 
cance they had forgotten, covered up 
by a mass of ritual for whose moral 
and spiritual meaning they had no 
thought. They represented a finished 
structure of unreality, the very oppo- 
site of that edifice of truth and righte- 
ousness which Jesus came to build. 



One of Thomas Moore's poems tells 
the story of a veiled prophet, who had 
wide influence and was venerated with 
superstitious devotion. At last, how- 
ever, the veil was torn from his face 
and there was seen not the shining of 
features of supernatural beauty, but 
the ghoul like features of a repulsive, 
brutally deformed face. Jesus tore 
away the veil which hid the true na- 
ture of the religion of the scribes and 
Pharisees and revealed the falseness 
hidden behind the veil. — N. Y. Chris- 
tian Advocate. 



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February 12, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Thirteen 



Our Little Folks 



GRANDMOTHER'S VALENTINE 

He had to wear his clothes, of course, 

for fear of taking cold, 
But we made a pair of paper wings and 

spangled them with gold. 
With gilded bow and arrow, too, our 

little laddie made 
As sweet a baby Cupid as ever was 

portrayed ! 

Then mother rimed a little verse and 

taught him to recite. 
He said it over patiently until each 

word was right: 
"My own dear grandmotner, I'll be 

you faithful Valentine 
Thro' all the happy year to come, if 

you will just be mine!" 

When Cupid got to grandma's house 

her table was all spread 
With muffins and with peach preserves 

and spicy gingerbread; 
And while he stood and gazed and 

gazed at all the tempting things, 
Dear grandma cried, "Why, Cupid, 

love, I know you by your wings!" 

"My own dear grandmother, I'll be — " 

our little lad began, 
And then he pouted out his lip, as 

dimpled Cupids «san, 
And looking up at grandmother as 

grieved as grieved could be. 
He cried, "I isn't Cupid, and I wants 

to stay for tea!" 

— Hannah G. Fernald. 



THEIR VALENTINES 

"Tomorrow'll be Valentine's day," 
began Lilly. 

"And we're going to send lots of val- 
entines," said Jenny . 

"Lots of balentines," echoed wee Ma- 
bel, who had followed them to grand- 
ma's room. 

"I wish I could see Miss Maberly's 
face when she gets hers," said Lilly, 
"and I guess May Evans won't feel 
like telling tales in a hurry." 

Grandma looked puzzled. "I thought 
rvalentjines were supposed to make 
people happier," she said. 

"Not this kind," answered Jenny. "I 
guess," she added, "these are looking- 
glass valentines, 'cause they make you 
see yourself just as folks see you. 

"You see," confidentially, "May 
Evans hears us say something about 
another girl, and then she runs to her 
and tells just what we have said, and 
it makes lots of trouble." 

"It naturally would," replied 
grandma, soberly. "I know nothing 
could make more." 

"You wouldn't like it yourself," said 
Jenny. 

"I am sure I shouldn't," answered 
grandma. "I think," she added, med- 
itatively, "I think, with such a girl 
round, I should say only nice things 
about the girls. Perhaps they wouldn't 
mind those." 

"Of course we can't always do that," 
said Jenny, although her cheeks grew 
a trifle redder. 

"Yes," interrupted Lilly, "and we're 
going to send Miss Maberly the pic- 
ture of a cross old lady." 

"Shall I tell you a story?" asked 
grandma. 

"Oh, do, do!" they cried. 

"I will tell you a story of Saint Val- 
entine's day. There are a great many 
reasons given for the celebration of 
the day. It is said there was an old 
pagan custom of choosing brides on 
February 14th, but I like this story 
best. Long, long ago there was a Irish, 
op of Rome named Valentine, who 
went about doing good deeds, but be- 
cause the people did not believe his 
preaching, they cast him into prison, 
where he finally died. 

"When he was gone, the poor people 
whom he had all his life been trying 
to help, were very sad. They had no 
one to help them now, no one to give 
them food and clothes, and to care 
for them when they were ill. And be- 
cause they felt so badly about the 
bishop, they began to neip each oth- 



er, and if a man gave his poor neigh- 
bor a coat, he would say, 'I do this for 
Valentine's sake.' If he gave him food 
he would say, T feed you because 
when I was hungry Valentine gave 
bread to me.' 

They thought so much about him 
and told over so many of his good 
deeds that at last they began to think 
he was something more than a mortal 
man, and must be a saint; and since 
February 14th was his birthday, they 
called that Saint Valentine's day, and 
sent presents to their friends to keep 
the good bishop in remembrance." 

The girls drew a long breath. "I 
didn't think Valentine's day meant 
that," said Jenny, soberly. "I don't 
believe May is coming," she added, 
"and I'm glad of it, for I shan't send 
those valentines." 

"Nor I," echoed Lilly. 

"Suppose you spend the evening 
with me," said grandma, "and we'll 
see if we can't help along the good 
saint's work." 

All the evening, while mother iand 
grandma looked on approvingly, the 
girls worked industriously, cutting 
from cardboard little heart-shaped 
boxes, which, after, being folded, past- 
ed and covered with crepe paper, were 
left upon the table, that grandma — 
as she suggested — might add a few 
finishing touches. 

If she and her mother worked until 
far into the night, they were well re- 
paid by the rapturous "ohs!" that 
greeted the pretty pink and lavender 
boxes, gay with clusters of pansies 
and forget-me-nots which had been 
painted upon them, while in gold upon 
each box were the words: , 

A Valentine for you 
Sweets o' the Sweet. 

The "ohs!" were louder than ever 
when, upon lifting the covers, every 
box was found to be full of cream 
walnuts, dates and chocolates — a sweet 
valentine indeed! 

The girls all declared there were 
tears in Miss Maberly's eyes when she 
found the surprise box upon her desk. 

"It has been such a happy day!" 
said Lilly, as she and Jenny sat upon 
the sofa in grandma's room that ev- 
ening. "The girls were all as nice as 
could be, and even Miss Maberly hasn't 
been the least bit cross." 

"Perhaps Miss Maberly's girls have 
done better than usual, said grand- 
ma, smiling. — L. M. Hadley. 



WHICH WAS IT 

Charlie Thompson had read about 
ice-boats, and he thought he would 
make one. So he took a little boat he 
had, put some new runners on it, and 
tried to sail it on the pond, which was 
close by the village. But it would not 
go for some reason, and he was very 
much vexed over it. The next day, 
as he was going to scool, he met Liz- 
zie Brent, who called out to nim as 
they passed: 

"O Charlie, I hear you have an ice- 
boat!" 

"I haven't a nice boat," said he 
crossly, and added to himself in an 
undertone, "It's a very poor one." 

The next day Lizzie was going by 
the pond when she saw Charlie work- 
ing at his boat. "Why, Charlie," said 
she, "I thought you told me yesterday 
you hadn't an ice-boat!" 

'Well, I haven't got a nice boat," 
and he went on with his work, without 
taking any more notice of her. 

She went off, thinking to herself, 
"I do believe that Charlie is getting 
queer. I wonder what he means!" 

They did not have much to say to, 
each other for some days, and the 
teacher noticed it, and asked Lizzie 
what was the matter, and she told 
her. Then the kind teacher drew her 
up close to her, and said: 

"Lizzie, dear, don't you know an 
ice-boat is not always a nice boat, and 



a nice boat is seldom an ice-boat?" 

Lizzie laughed at her mistake and 
made friends with Charlie at once, 
for she saw the difference between an 
ice-boat and a nice boat. — J. M. Hub- 
bard. 



THINGS THAT HAVE HELPED 

God would not have us think about 
tomorrow 
As of some cloud that lies 
Before our anxious eyes, 
And fills our hearts with dread of 
coming sorrow. 

How can we tell? The sun may shine 
more brightly 
Than it has shown before — 
I know life holds in store 
More good than ill for those who view 
it rightly. 

And He, whose hand is always wisely 
guiding, 
Can only give his best 
To those who wait and rest — 
Through all lifes's need in His great 
love confiding. — Edith Hick- 
man Divall. 



N. C. CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE PIANO 
CLUB MAKES PIANO BUYING 
EASY 

By placing your order for a piano 
or player-piano through the Club you 
get the benefit of the lowest factory 
price, which is granted on orders for 
one hundred instruments or more. 
This means a tremendous saving. 

You incur no obligation except for 
your own instrument. 

The Club provides the most con- 
venient terms of easy payment to 
those who desire it. 

You are absolutely protected against 
dissatisfaction, both now and hereaf- 
ter, for the instruments are guaran- 
teed against all imperfections in work- 
manship and materials, by one of the 
oldest, largeset and most reliable Pi- 
ano Houses in America. 

Every feature of the Club has been 
attested and approved by over one 
thousand good people, some of whom 
are doubtless your friends and ac- 
quaintances. If you need a good piano 
or player-piano write for your copy of 
the Club catalogue and investigate the 
greatest piano opportunity that has 
ever been offered. Address the Man- 
agers, Ludden and Bates, North Caro- 
lina Christian Advocate Piano Club 
Dept., Atlanta. Ga. 



"After I wash my face I look in the 
mirror to see if it's clean. Don't 
you?" asked the sweet little girl of 
Bobbie. 

"Don't have to," said Bobbie; "I 
just look at the towel." 



CARING FOR TOOLS 

"I set him down for not knowing 
what he was talking about," said one 
college student to another, referring 
to a young man from another school 
who had patronizingly commented on 
the few appliances in one of the scien- 
tific departments. "I told him they 
down there could have the tools as 
long as we kept the man. Professor 
Wise is worth a whole outfit." 

The lad was right. The few skill- 
fully selected tools and the brain be- 
hind them had given renown already 
to that part of the college work. 

There are some people who spend 
so much time in acquiring new talents 
that they never succeed in getting 
anything worth while done with them. 
Fewer accomplishments kept bright 
by steady use would be more to the 
purpose. The dear old lady with a 
talent for making real rye bread and 
for finding just the people to present 
a loaf to here and there is worthily 
living up to a genuine talent. 

It is not important or desirable that 
we dazzle the world by the splendor 
of our equipment- The only point to 
be concerned about is that we use our 
tools, few as they may seem to be, to 
the best possible advantage and for 
the good of others. Skill comes with 
use. — Forward. 



If it's Gardner's it's Good 




Agent for 

Cypher's, 
Incubators 
Brooders 

and 
Supplies 

Gardner's 

DRUG STORE 



A Ten Dollar Bill 

will buy you an 

Accident Policy 

paying from $1000 to $2000 for ac- 
cidental death. $250, death from 
any cause. Five to ten dollars a 
week for disability as long as you 
live. Write me. 

Max T. Payne, Special Agt. 

Aetna Life Insurance Co. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Your Money 
Will Earn 



6f 



With absolute safety If invested in 
Guaranteed Gold Bonds 

secured by First Mortgage on North Carolina 
Real Estate worth twice amount bonds is- 
sued against it. Bonds due one year after. 
Principal and Interest guaranteed Interest 
payable semi - annually. Denominations 
$100.00 up. Ten Years in business without 
loss of a penny for any patron. 
Write for free booklet. 

PIEDMONT TRUST CO. 
, Burlington, N. C. 



>c \ 



GET IT AT Q DELL'S 

Enclose Your 
Burial Plot 




With Cyclone Ornamen- 
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keep off trespassers, as 
well as afford protection. 

CYCLONE PRODUCTS 
BEAUTIFY 

Odell Hdw. Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



Ik 



Page Fourteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 12, 1914 



Carolina & Norlh-Western Railway Co. 

Schedule Effective, Nov. 9th, 1913. 



Northbound 


Daily 
Pasa. 

NO. 8 


Dai ly 
Pa • 

NO. 1 


NO. 50 
Ex. Sun 




3 40pm 

4 26 
616 

6 80 
710 

7 40 

8 66 


7 50am 

8 36 

9 80J 

10 30 

11 05 

11 46 

110 nm 
2 36 p 
2 46 




Yorkvllle 

Gastonia 

Lin eo In ton 




Hickory 


7 00am 

8 10 


Mortimer 




Kdgcinom Ar. 













Southbound 


Daily 
Pasa. 

NO. 7 


Daily 
Pass. 

NO. 9' 


Mixed 

Ex. Hun 
NO. 61 


Kdgemont Lv. 


7 10am 

7 17 

8 30 

9 30 
10 15 
10 66 
1166 
12 44 

1 30pm 






Mortimer 






Lenoir __ 

Hlckorv 

Newton 


1 36 

2 35 pm 

3 05 

3 48 

4 50 
6 36 

6 25pm 


2 30 pm 

3 47 p 


Lincolnton 




Gastonia Ar. 




Yorkvllle 




Chester Ar. 











X Arrive 

CONNECTIONS 

Chestei — Southern Ry., S. A. L. and L. &C. 
Yorkville — Southern Railway. 
Lincolnton — S. A. L. 

Gastonia— Southern Ry., Piedmont <& Northern 
Railway. 

Newtonand Hickory— Southern Railway. 
E. F. REiD, G. P. Agt, Chester, S. C. 




I Protect 
Your Home 
With Shade Trees 

Have cool spots in summer, and 
shelter from winter winds. Use 
Elm, Maple, Linden, Sycamore, for 
shade ; Lombardy Poplar, Indian 
Cedar, Virginia Cedar, or Spruce, for 
shelter. 

We can help you make a wise choice, tell 
you how to plant, and furnish the best trees 
for the southern planter. Get our catalogue 
today, send us a list of the trees you want. 
We will ship at the right time. 

J. VAN LINDLEY NURSERY CO. 
Box 203, Pomona, N. C 



EVERY WOMAN 
$25 



SHOULD 
EARN 



PER 
WEEK 



Introducing our very complete Spring* ine of b eautlful 
wool suitings, wash fabrics, fancy waistings, silks, hdkfs. 
petti coa ts, etc. Uptodate N. Y. City patterns Finest 
11 neon t he market. Dealing dlrec iwitht he mill £ you 
will find our prices low. If others can make $10 to $30 
weekly you can also. Samples* ful llnstructionsi n neat 
sample case, shipped express prepaid No money re- 
quired. Exclusive territory Write for particulars. Be 
first to apply. 

Standard Dress Goods Company, 32-2st St. Blngharoton.N.Y. 




ATLANTA. GEORGIA 

Thorough courses, capable teachers and cour- 
teous treatmentf or a quarter of a century have 
placed DRAUGHON'S far in the lead. Get 
ready for the unprecedented wave of business 
prosperity. Write for catalogue "P" 



Your Foot Comfort 

IS GUARANTEED IN 

Soft vici kid, tmllned, turn style^ 
odel, steel area support, rub- 
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o conform to shape of any foot. 
Hade Also in Oxlord Ties. 

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Men, Women. Children 
Do away with foot 
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are built to givo every possible comfort— solt, stylish, 
do not need breaking in. We GUARANTEE to fit any 
foot perfectly orif for any reason you are not satis- 
fied, to refund your money. 

FREE CATALOG 2£LS2f5SC^ftsy;aS 

THE 0. SIMON SHOE, 1589 Broadway, Brooklyn, N.T, 




W Style, 
Service 
andComfort 
Combined 



ALEXANDER'S 

QUALITY DAHLIAS 

The Twentieth Century 
Flower 
The Dahlia of to-day Is of sur- 
passing beauty as a single flow- 
er, exquisite for private gar- 
dens, charmingln masses, 
and ideal for planting 
against shrubbery. Alex- 
ander's Up-to-Date Dahl- 
I as lead the World ; because they are perfect In type 
and shape, beautiful in color, and mostimportant of 
all— Free flowering. Our many customers are satis- 
fled; they receive good stock; true to name, and best 
of all— Guaranteed 'to Grow. All Flower Lovers are 
i nvited to send to the Dahlia King for his latest Fret 
Illustrated Catalogue, which contains helpful descrip- 
tions and valuable cultural hints on Dahlias, 
Gladioli, Roses and Cannas. 

J. K. ALEXANDER, The Dahlia King 
83-85 Central St., East Bridge water, Mass. 




Quarterly Meetings 



ASH EVI LLE DISTRICT— C. A. Wood, 
Presldlno Elder, Weavervllle, N. C. 
First Round' 

February 

Falrview Ct., Tweeds ...6.8 7-8 

Tryon and Saluda, Tryon 8 

Weavervllle Ct.. Salem 14-16 

Mars Hill, Laurel 16 

Leicester, Leicester 21-22 

Walnut, Jewell Hill 28 

March 

Spring Creek, Balm drove 1 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT— Plato T. Dur- 
ham, Presiding Elder, Charlotte, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Ansonvllle, Ansonvllle 7-8 

Oilesvllle, Lllesvllle 8-9 

Morven, Sandy P 14-16 

Wadesboro, night 16 

Unionville, Orace 21-22 

Polkton, Peachland, night 22-23 

March 

Matthews, Matthews 1-2 

Marshvllle, Gilboa 7-8 

Mt. Zion, Mt. Zion 14-16 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT— Q. T. Rowe, 
Presiding Elder, Greensboro, N. C. I 
First Round '" I 

February I 

Coleridge Ct., Concord 7-8 i 

Ramseur and F'ville, Ramseur 8-8 

Ruffln Ct., Kuffln 14-16 I 



MOUNT AIRY DISTRICT— R. M. Hoyle, 
Presiding Elder, Mount Airy, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Jonesville Ct., Jonesvllle 7-8 

Elkin Station 8-1 

Danbury Ct, Davis' Chapel 14-16 

Spray and Draper, Spray S 31-22 

Leaks ville Station 88-24 

Dobson Ct., Slleam 38 

March 

Yadklnville, East Bend 1-3 



M ORG ANTON DISTRICT— J. E. GAY, 
Presiding Elder, Marten, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Connelly Springs, Connelly Springs, 7-8 

Mica ville, Shoal Creek 13 

Bald Crtek, Elk Shoal 14-15 

Burnesvllle, Burnesville 16-18 

Spruce Pine and Bakensville, Spruce 
Pin. 21-M 

Second Round 

March 

Marion Station 1-2 

Old Fort, Providence 7-8 

Thermal City, Pisgah 14-15 

Table Rock, Linville 21-22 

McDowell, Nebo, S. S. Institute ...28-29 

April 

Rutherfordton, Gilkey 4-6 

Forest City, Cedar Grove 11-12 

Broad River, Grays Chapel 17 

Green River, Bethlehem 18-19 

.Cliffside, Hopewell 25-26 

May 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Caroleen ...2-3 

Morganton Ct., Gilboa ...9-10 

Morganton Station 10-11 

Connelly Springs, Friendship 16-17 

Micavtlle 23-24 

Spruce Pine , 29 

Bald Creek 30-31 

June 

Marion Circuit ,y> 



NORTH WILKESBORO DISTRICT — M. 
H. Vestal, Presiding Elder, North 
Wllkesboro, N. C. - (l 1 •' 
First Round 

February 

Creston, Creston 7-8 

Watauga, Henson's Chapel 10 

Elk Park, Elk Park 18 

Avery, Pinola 14-16 

Second Round 

March 

"Wllkesboro, Wllkesboro 1 

Laurel Springs, Transou 7-8 

Sparta, Sparta I*" 15 

Wilkes, Union 21-22 

Helton, Methodist Chapel 28-29 

April 

Jefferson, Bethany 4-5 

Boone, Hopewell 11-12 

Elkville Mission 1* 

North Wilkesboro Station 26-27 



SALISBURY DISTRICT — W. R. Ware, 
Presiding Eldor, Salisbury, N. C. 

February 

Kannapolls Station 14-16 

Landls Circuit, Landis 14-15 

Bethel and Loves Chapel, Bethel ..31-32 

Concord, Ep worth, night 33 

Concord, Central, 11 a. m. ....28, Mar. 1 
Concord, Westford, night 28, Mar. 1 

SHELBY ulSTRICT— J. — R. Scroggs, 
Presiding Elder, Shelby, N. C. 

February 

Lowell, Lowell >'.'. Ji 14 

McAden ville McAdenvllle, night 14 

Crouse, Antioch 31 

Cherryvllle, Mary's Chapel 38 



Standard Form 
Collection Envelopes 



Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
HOLT'S CHAPEL 



FOR PASTOR'S SALARY 



MOUNT 



Date... 



191... 



Dollars 



Cents 



HISSIOHS AHD CONFERENCE COLLECTIONS 

Western North Carolina Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
MOUNT ZION CHURCH 



Name- 
Date ... 




$1.90 for lOOO, delivered 

$1.40 for additional 1000, delivered 
FOR EITHER FORM! 



This price is based on using the above forms, changing name of church 
only. The large envelope is manila, and of the quality regularly used for 
Pastor's Salary collections. The small envelope can be furnished in white, 
green or cherry. Its difference in color and size from the Pastor's Salary 
form makes it ideal for Missions and Conference Collections. 

If special form is desired the price will average $2.40 for the first 1000, 
and $1.40 for additional 1000's, delivered. 

Special rates on large quantities.; 

The Advocate Press, Greensboro, N. C. 



Second Round 

Stanley, Stanley 7-8 

Lincolnton 8-9 

Gastonia, Main Street 15 

Ozark and West End 15 

Kings Mountain, night 27 

Bessemer City, P. M. 28 

March 

Shelby, Central 1 

Polkville, Caser 7-8 

Belwood, Palm Tree 14-15 

Shelby Ct., Sulphur Springs 21-22 

Lowesville, Salem 28-29 

Mt Holly, Mt. Holly 29-30 



STAT ESVI LLE DISTRIST— L. T. Mann, 
Presiding Eldor, Statesvllie, N. C. 
First Round 

February 

Cool Springs Ct, New Salem, 

11 a. m 14-15 

Troutman Ct., Vanderburg, 11 a. m., 21-22 
Mooresvillo Sta., Mooresville, night, 23-23 
Mooresvllle Ct., Falrview, 

11 a. m K...38, Mar. 1 

March 

Davidson Sta., Davidson, night 1-3 

Marlon Station 7-8 

N. Lenoir Ct., Mt. Zion, 11 a. m. ..7-8 
Lenoir Sta., Lenoir, night 8-9 



WAYN ESVI LLE DISTRICT— L. T. Cor- 
ded, Presiding Elder, R. 2, Ashevllle, 
N. C. 

February 

Murphy Ct., Tomotla 14 

Andrews Station 16-16 

Crestmont 31-33 

Waynesvllle Station 34 

Canton Station 36 



WINSTON DISTRICT— H. K. Boyer, Pre- 
siding Eider, Winston, N. C. 

First Round 

February 

Centenary, 11 a. m 14 

West End, 7:30 p. m 14 

Farmlngton, Farmlngton 21-22 

Advance, Advance 23-33 



MILLER, ROBINS & WEILL 

General Insurance 

General Agents Fidelity and Deposit 

Company of Maryland 
108 North Ebn Street 



THB SPACE BELONGS TO 

R0IT.W. MURRAY 

GENERAL 

Insurance 



North Carolina 

8)06 14 Sou* Elm Su\ 
MS 



February 12, 1914 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



Page Fifteen 



The Christian Advocate Offers You 

This Well Known Bible Dictionary 

SEE SPECIAL OFFER BELOW 

Realizing the wide demand that exists-among our constituents for this Bible Dictionary, we have 
made a special arrangement with the publishers of the work by which they agreed to supply it to 

us on exceptional terms, provided we 



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This is a reduced 
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Address* CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, GREENSBORO, N. C. 



GETTING THE BETTER OF THE 
BLUES 

"Oh, I was just as blue as Indigo 
all the week — I just stayed In and 
wished I could die!" I overheard a 
lovely looking young matron say. Her 
lot in life I knew had fallen in pleas- 
ant places. I wonder if she could af- 
ford the costly luxury she had indulg- 
ed in — I just wondered. In her home 
are an adoring husband, four fine chil- 
dren and a pretty young sister — six 
individuals sure to be affected by her 
moods, to say nothing of her friends, 
servants and others who must inevit- 
ably catch some of the far vibrations 
she set in motion when she dropped 
into the depths. 

I know of nothing which so blights 
the peace and happiness of a home 
as a member of the family who is ad- 
dicted to the blues habit. An out- 
burst of anger frequently brings an 
answering clap that clear sthe atmos- 
phere; sorrow comes with a sort of 
dignity and draws closer every tie; 
money loss means quick stirring about 
to make it up. But the blues, those 
awful seasons when my lady likes to 
sit in solitude, refusing to smile, or 
else weeps dejectedly into her pillow 
— how on earth is her family to meet 
the situation? It seems disrespect- 
ful to be happy and jolly when she 
is so plainly suffering, but from a 
beginning rooted in a sort of sympa- 
thy for her, that unholy gloom is like- 
ly to work itself out in the feelings 
of others, and by the time the origi- 
nal offender has found respite in re- 
action, a sort of endless chain has 
started which is fearsome to contem- 
plate. 

In this thing of having the blues, 
we are too likely to forget that it is 
purely a matter of yielding to a base 
temptation as is Tim Donovan's action 
when he shies a dish at his wife be- 
cuse his breakfast does not suit him. 

Very likely Mr. Donovan could say 
that he went to bed "half seas over," 
and arose with "such a head on him" 
and nerves in such a jangle that the 
dish flew out of his hand before he 
had time to consider. But the time 
for him to consider was berore he took 
the drinks. By the same token, she 
may have got into the shade of the 
willows before she realized where she 
was drifting, but the strong probabil- 
ity is that she set out upon her lone 
pilgrimage because something went 
against her ideas in her home or so- 
cial relations, and her retirement is 
quite as frank an expression of out- 
raged selfishness as was Mr. Dono- 
van's dish. In the beginning she had 
an opportunity for barring out sulky 
thoughts — because if they can't find 
standing room they can't crowd out 
cheerfulness. Bridget Donovan may 
deserve the dish, and my lord may 
have righteously incurred what he has 
to endure during his partner's disaf- 
fection; but as such grievances are 
private and personal in their nature, 
they surely should have the secluded 
attention that is expected in such cases 
and not ruin the family peace. 

Just as a matter of common sense, 
it may be remarked that the gain re- 
sulting from a spell of the blues is 
entirely out of proportion to the cost 
involved. After all, what does one 
get by it? It makes one most awfully 
unattractive for the time being. I 
have read the phrase "the sulky 
beauty," but I never have seen a 
sulky beauty, and I don't believe we 
would glance twice at Venus herself 
if she had the dumps. Then that 
sheepish feeling one has when emerg- 
ing from the shadows and coming shy- 
ly and timidly back into the light 
and sunshine of family life — what is 
that, and what is it that always makes 
one so reluctant to meet anotner's 
look at such times? I think it must 
be that purer and higher self which 
looks out through the eyes, and is 
frankly ashamed of that lower mani- 
festation which has so misrepresented 
the true being. 

This brings me to the remedy I 
have discovered. It is in acknowledg- 
ing the claim and realizing the duty 



of the greatest good to the greatest 
number that we become as princes 
royal of the very household of God, 
and enter into our birthright of the 
command of our own selves. 

It is through the larger view gained 
by conspicuously aligning one's self 
with good — through dedicating one's 
whole soul, mind, strength and body 
to the great work of universal happi- 
ness, that we truly draw near to God. 
Once within the secret place of the 
Most High, we place ourselves above 
the thraldom of the small and petty — 
we get the better of the blues habit 
forever. — Susie Bouchelle Wight, in 
the Continent. 



My character today is for the most 
part, simply the resultant of all the 
thoughts I have ever had, of all the 
feelings I have ever cherished,, and 
all the deeds I have ever performed. 
It is the entirety of my previous years 
packed and crystallized into the pres- 
ent moment, so that character is the 
quintessence of biography; so that 
anybody who knows my character — 
and there is no keeping character un- 
der cover — knows what for forty or 
more years I have been doing and 
been thinking. Character is for the 
most part simply habit become fixed. 
— Rev. Charles H. PwrJchurst. 



'If you are making a pound of but- 
ter a day, you may easily, with no ad- 
ditional cows, increase that pound to 
a'^uijd and a third. In a year of 365 
days, that amounts to $36.50 and in 
two years' time will much more than 
pay "for the tubular separator needed 
to gain that other third of a pound. 
If" you are making two pounds a 
day, you can gain enough in a year 
to pay for the tubular separator and 
have the same amount in added profit 
next year. If you should be making 
four pounds a day you may buy the 
tubular separator and have $75 to the 
good. That is what a modern inven- 
tion does for the dairying business. 
Write the Sharpies Separator Com- 
pany, West Chester, Penn., for proof 
of these statements. Their tubular 
separator is not an uncertainty, but a 
scientifically' * designed machine that 
gets more butter fat from fresh milk 
than you can skim off soar milk. This 
has been a. .most profitable device 
wherever used, and it will be worth 
your time • to „ investigate its merits 
whether you have one cow, two cows 
or more. 



We must look for the true face of 
our religion in. .the face of those who 
have best represented it. — A. P. Stan- 
ley. 



A REMARKABLE SOURCE 

Look to any quarter and you will 
not find quite the same quality and 
quantity of reading-matter as in the 
unique combination provided by the 
Youth's Companion. In provision and 
purpose it it the ideal home paper. 
Live and wholesome fiction. Articles 
of inspiration by men who have 
achieved. Information to hand that 
busy people want. Enough of edi- 
torial comment, of science and of 
events to keep him abreast of the day. 
Special family pages, boys pages, 
girls' pages. The editorial page is 
unsurpassed by that of any publica- 
tion. This year there are to be eight 
fine serials, 250 shorter scones, be- 
sides articles of travel and informa- 
tion, and 1,000 bits of fun. 

A year of The Youth's Companion 
as it is today will make the finest 
investment for your family, includ- 
ing all ages. 

If you do not know The Companion 
let us send you three current issues 
free, that you may thoroughly test 
the paper's quality. 

THE YOUTH'S COMPANION 
144 Berkeley St., Boston, Mass. 



Do not pray for crutches, but for 
wings. — Philiips Brooks. 



Page Sixteen 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 12, 1914 



11: 



IB 



Publisher s Appeal for Advocate Campaign 

____ 1914 — — = 



The lists for each pastoral charge have been sent out and 
are now in the hands of the pastors. If any pastor has failed to 
receive lists or if any lists received are incomplete we will 
thank them to notify the office at once so correct lists may be 
sent. 

Now is the time to press the battle. These beautiful winter 
days offer great opportunity for pastoral work and there is 
no better way to carry on your Advocate campaign than in 
connection with pastoral visiting. To present the matter of 
family worship, family reading and the general subject of 
home culture makes the pastoral visit a matter of real value 
to the home and will make the pastor feel that he is really do- 
ing something worth while for his people. Working on this 
line a pastor can almost always leave the church paper behind 
him as a permanent blessing to the home he has visited. He 
may not always find the family with the money at hand, but 
if he will take the subscription to be paid in 30 or 60 days and 
send along the name we will start the paper at once. 

If at the expiration of the 30 or 60 days the money is not 
forthcoming, all the pastor has to do is to drop a postal card 
notifying the office and the name will be charged off the ac- 
count. This is the best way to sample our people and get them 
interested in the church paper. 

Where the pastor prefers he can arrange for a canvass 
through a committee or some representative of the church. 
For instance, a Baraca class or Philathea class will frequently 
prove a very effective helper in such work. Always give us 
time to supply at least two sample copies before the canvass is 
made. 

We are trying very hard to give our people a paper without 
so much space devoted to advertising. We hope our people 
will show their appreciation of this by increasing our circula- 
tion. In order to have a paper clear of advertising of any 
doubtful character, we have cut out from $1200. to $1500. per 
annum of our usual income from this source. We must have 
a larger income from subscriptions in order to compensate for 
this loss. 




This cut shows the full silver set described in No. 1. All other 
premiums including 2, 3, 4 and 5 are portions of this 
full set. The goods are genuine first-class 
triple plated as described. 



List of Premiums and Prizes 

No. 1. One 26-piece Wm. Rogers Triple Plate 12 oz. Silver 
Set, consisting of one Oak or Mahogany Chest, Six Knives, 
Six Forks, Six Tablespoons, Six Teaspoons, One Sugar Bowl 
and One Butter Knife. The above will be given to the one 
who secures fifty new subscribers. 



No. 2. To the one who will secure thirty-five new sub- 
scriptions, we will give the same assortment of ware only 
without the chest. 

No. 3. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Knives and Forks 
and Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twenty-five 
new subscribers. 

No. 4. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons and one 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in fifteen new sub- 
scriptions. 

No. 5. One Set Rogers Teaspoons, one Sugar Shell, and 
Butter Knife, to the one who will send in twelve to fifteen 
new subscriptions. 

No. 6. To the ones who will secure ten subscriptions, we 
will give their choice of the following premiums: 

A. One Set Rogers Triple Plate Tablespoons, one Set 
Rogers Nickle Silver Knives and Forks in a nice box. 

B. One Set Stag Handle Carver, consisting of Carving 
Knife, Fork and SteeL 

C. One Set Aluminum Ware, consisting of one Aluminum 
6-quart Pudding-Pan, one 5-quart Aluminum Milk Pan, one 
Aluminum Dipper, and one Aluminum Cake-Pan. 

# * * * 

In addition to the above we offer the following 
Grand Prizes 

1. To the one sending in the largest number of new sub- 
scribers, provided the number shall not be less than 50, we 
offer, in addition to the premium, one No. 2690 Forbes Quadru- 
ple Plate Tea Set, consisting of one 2Vk pt. Tea Pot, one Sugar 
Bowl, one Cream Pitcher, one Spoon Holder handsomely en- 
graved, and one Butter Dish. 

2. To the one securing the second largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 40, we offer : One 
Nickle-Plated Coffee Percolator Machine, that does away 
with the tannic acid in coffee, and furnishes the pure juice 
of the coffee, especially adapted to the use of old persons 
who are deprived of the use of the beverage on account of its 
injurious effect. With this machine, you can make the best 
drip coffee in five minutes, without injurious qualities. 

3. To the one securing the third largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 30, we offer: 
One Satin-Finished Tilting Triple Plate Water Pitcher, in 
tilting frame. 

4. To the one securing the fourth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 25, we offer : One 
Housekeeper's Casserole, with nickel outside cover — a beauti- 
ful article, and suitable for anyone's table. 

5. To the one securing the fifth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 20, we offer : One 
Kitchen Set, consisting of one Meat Broiler, Ice Pick, Meat 
Fork, Basting Spoon, Butcher Knife, Bread Knife, Cleaver, 
Paring Knife, Can Opener, Bread Toaster, and one ten-hook 
rack to bold above — eleven pieces in all. 

6. To the one securing the sixth largest number of new 
subscribers, the number not to be less than 15, we offer : One 
Ladies' or Gents' Pearl Handle Good Metal Pocket Knife. 

In each case it is understood that the renewals are to 
be collected and in case of the failure of any old subscriber to 
renew, a new subscriber is to be found to take the place of 
the one discontinuing. In no case can a premium or prize be 
awarded where the renewals are neglected. 

Cash must accompany each' name sent in, except where 
the pastor is willing to become absolutely responsible. 

Let the work begin at once so that all may have the benefit of 
the paper for the Conference year. 

Address all correspondence regarding the above to 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



orin Carolina 

Official Oipt of tk Western Bortb &rolina£onference 
IHethodist Qjiscopal £lwrcb, South 



Thursday, February 19, 1914 




Page Two 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



February 19, IS 14 



Note and Comment 



Virginia to Vote on Statewide Prohibition 

On September 22, 1914, Virginians will be 
given an opportunity to say whether a majority 
desire prohibition for the entire state, if the 
state votes dry the law will go into effect on 
November 1, 1916, according to the Enabling 
Act that has just passed the Virginia legis- 
lature. 

4fc *X ! 'X- 

Six Vice-Admirals for the Navy 

A bill that passed the Senate February 13 
provides that the United States Navy be al- 
lowed six vice-admirals. For years the navy 
has been appealing for a revival of a higher 
grade than rear-admiral. In the discussion of 
the bill before the Senate, it was pointed out 
that in case of joint operations in Mexican 
waters the British commander would be in 
charge, although England has only two small 
cruisers and the United States six battleships, 
because of the English officer's higher rank. 
The action of the Senate pleases Secretary 
Daniels. 

What the Registration of Women Voters Shows 

In one day approximately 150,000 women in 
Chicago registered for the election to be held in 
April . One of the smallest registrations of any 
ward in the city was the first, which is the 
center of the tenderloin district. On i,he other 
hand, certain wards that represent "a quiet, 
clean, home-loving population," registered the 
largest number of women voters of any of the 
wards of the entire city. Evidently the voting 
is not going to be confined to the ignorant and 
vicious portion of the female population. 

The women did not object to giving their 
ages. 

A New Liner the Biggest Yet 

The Vaterland, 950 feet long : and of 58,000 
ton burden, is 31 feet longer than the Impera- 
tor and has a greater tonnage by 6,000. At 
the present the Imperator is the largest vessel 
afloat, but the primacy must in a little time be 
yeilded to the Vaterland. The first sailing out 
of New York Harbor of the Vaterland will be 
June 16, 1914. 
* *. v 'i , , * * # ' 

A President for Johns Hopkins 

The Independent (New York) delivers itself 
upon the Johns Hopkins presidency after this 
fashion : 

"The trustees of Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, having for some years surveyed mankind 
from China to Peru in search of a suitable pres- 4 
ident, have discovered him in the former place.. 
Dr. Frank Johnson Goodnow, who has been 
offered the position, is now serving as — or rath- 
er occupying the position of — constitutional 
adviser to the Chinese government. The chance 
to fabricate a constitution for four millions of 
people is one never before offered to a human 
being, and it is no wonder that it tempted Pro- 
fessor Goodnow from his chair of Administra- 
tive Law at Columbia. But Yuan-Shih-Kai has 
as little use for a constitution as the Manchu 
Emperors, so it is quite likely that Professor 
Goodnow may be ready to return to America 

and accept this important position. ' ' 

# # # * 

Complimentary to President Wilson 

Ex-president Taft in last week's issue of The 
Saturday Evening Post has a comprehensive 
article upon "The Future of the Republican 
Party." In his accustomed judicial manner, 
the Republican candidate for the presidency 
in the last campaign gives his estimate of what 
led to his own defeat, and also to the failure 
of Colonel Roosevelt to win, as he had been 
accustomed to do — he writes, too, at some length 
of the present administration, and concludes 
with the political outlook, particularly, as it 
has to do with the future of the Republican 
party. 

In his reference to the present administra- 
tion, Mr. Taft speaks in a complimentary man- 
ner of the President. Here is what he says in 
part: 



" H<; has certainly got off on the right foot 
in pQttin^ into force his announced domestic 
policy. ,^Mr. Wilson has established his leader- 
ship of the party and has maintained discipline 
in a way to command admiration. He has kept 
before the members of his party in the House 
and Senate the fear of their Democratic con- 
stituencies and threat of popular appeal in case 
of insurgency. I do not agree with his tariff 
policy, but I am glad that the promises made 
by his party ha^, been promptly carried out." 
-'#### 

The Cape-to-Cairo Railway 

To build a railroad from Cairo, at the east 
end of the Mediterranean, through the center 
of Africa and for the entire length of the con- 
tinent, a distance of 6,944 miles to the cape of 
Good Hope, was a tremendous undertaking. 
But in two years it is expected this enormous 
task beguil by Cecil Rhodes will have been 
completed. It is an entirely British enterprise 
intended primarily for commercial purposes, 
as it will open up the great central regions of 
Africa, which is the section of greatest re- 
sources, to commerce and civilization. 

\!)<i'" # # # # 

The Bible in North Dakota Schools 

North' Dakota has put the Bible in the cur- 
riculum of the state high schools. Bible study 
has a regular position in the course of study 
and credit is given for successful work done in 
this course, the same as in any other branches 
of study in the high school. The state has also 
issued an official syllabus for Bible study. 
# # # # 

Growth of Religious Bodies in the United States 

The Methodists led all other religious bodies 
last ear in the United States with an increase of 
220,000, according to the figures compiled by 
Dr. H. K. Carroll for the b'ederal Council of 
Churches. The Roman Catholic gain was 212,- 
500. The Baptists gained 64,600 ; the Presby- 
rians 45,600; .Lutherans 36,1U0; the Disciples 
21,800; and the Episcopalians 16,500. 

The^otal net increase in membership of all 
the religious bodies for the year 191 3was $655,- 
000, or -1.8 per cent., which is only a fraction 
under- 'two per cent, and about equal to the 
average gain in population . To many the sur- 
prising feature of these figures will be the 
small gain snown by the Roman Catholics, in 
the face of reports coming from many quarters 
which assert mat the Roman church is to soon 
control this country. 

The membership of churches numbering more 
than 500,000 is as follows: Roman Catholic 
13,099,534; Methodist 7,125,069 ; Baptist 5,924,- 
662 ; Lutherans 2,338,722 ; Presbyterians 2,027,- 
593 ; Disciples 1,519, 369 ; Episcopalians 997,- 
407 ; Congregational 748,340. These eight bod- 
ies contain 34,000,00(Lof the 37,280,000 church 
members of the United States. 

Dr. Carroll numbers the Jews at 2,000,000 
of whom 900,000 are in New York city, which 
makes that 'city the greatest centre of Jewish 
population in the world. 

The report shows an extraordinary number 

of new churches, and at the same time, that 

the progress has been along old orthodox lines, 

while religious fads and isms have made little 

headway. 

\ * * * * 

Senator Bacon of Georgia Dead 

After a ten days' illness, Senator Augustus 
O. Bacon died February 14 in a Washington 
hospital at the age of seventy-five. His death 
came as a surprise, both to his colleagues of 
the Senate and to the public generally. 

As a Senator and statesman he had attained 
nation-wide prominence. In the Senate where 
he served with conspicuous ability for nineteen 
years, Senator ; Bacon had become one of the 
best known and most highly esteemed mem- 
bers of tikat august body. Since March 4, 1913, 
he had been chairman of the Foreign Relations 
Committee, one of the great committees of the 
Senate* [q 

Of this distinguished Georgia Senator, Pres- 
ident Wilson wrote the following statement for 
the press: 

"All, who know Senator Bacon will sincerely 
deplore his death. It deprives the Senate of 
one of its oldest and most experienced mem- 
bers, & man who held with something like rev- 
erence :to the traditions of the great body of 
which he was so long a part and who sought 



in all that he did to maintain its standards of 
statesmanship and service. The great state of 
Georgia will miss her distinguished son and 
servant. My own association with him had 
been the most cordial and, to me, helpful sort. 
I particularly profited by his experience in 
foreign affairs." 

* * * # 
The Railroad's Complaint 

"I have never known a time when the rail- 
roads were so urgently in need of sympathy 
and co-operation as now, instead of the criti- 
cism that is meeting them," said Mr. S. H. 
llardwick, passenger traffic manager of the 
Southern Railway, in a speech at Charlotte, 
N. C, several days ago. Accejjting this as 
a correct statement of the present situation of 
the railroads, we are inclined to ask if the 
railroads have at any time shown a zeal for 
commanding the sympathy and co-operation of 
the people? Too often when the public has 
asked for bread in the way of equitable frieght 
rates and reasonable accomodations as public 
carriers, the railroads have been too ready to 
give a stone. 

If the railroads would show the same cour- 
tesy and fairness without competition that they 
are accustomed to practice in the presence of 
a reasonable competition, they would enjoy 
more sympathy and co-operation on the part of 
the public. Some little consideration is due the 
people, even by a railroad that holds a monop- 
oly of the tarffic. 

In saying these things we are mindful that 
many persons are not disposed to treat the rail- 
roads fairly or with justice. If they had an 
opportunity to act according to their wishes 
some would rob and defraud these public car- 
riers in every possible manner. But we believe 
that the maojrity of the people are disposed 
to sympathetically co-operate, if the railroads 
would only meet them something like half way. 

# * * # 

Fun By Newspaper Men 

The Gridiron Club of Washington, D. C, in 
their midwinter dinner given at Washington in 
honor of Saint Valentine seemed to be well up 
to the high standard set by that celebrated 
company of funmakers. Wit, satire, ridicule, 
are all employed with telling effect as these 
bright fellows point out the foibles, pet vanities 
and outstanding characteristics of the great and 
near great. 

Here is a specimen of their satire for Advo- 
cate readers who may care for such. These 
are some of the "watchful waiters." 

' ' There was Albert Jeremiah Beveridge ' wait- 
ing for the people to appreciate true states- 
manship. ' And John Lind, the original watch- 
ful waiter, who never gets tired of his job, 
though some other people do. 

Asked whether Lind was a visitor in Mexico, 
Huerta replied: 'Visitor! He's a regular 
boarder. ' 

Uncle Joe: " What is he doing down there ? " 

Huerta : ' ' Me, I guess. ' ' 

Uncle Joe: "Are you nearing the end of 
your resources?" 

Huerta: "Not a bit of it. The printing 
presses are working over time and the output 
of government bonds is good." 



The Daily Christian Advocate 

A daily edition of the Christian Advocate 
will be published at Oklahoma City, Okla., dur- 
ing the session of the General Conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in May, 
1914. Accurate stenographic reports of the 
proceedings will be published; the speeches, 
the reports of committees, memorials, the Bish- 
ops ' Address, the fraternal addresses, and many 
items as they develop from day to day. 

As the Daily Advocate will be the only 
official -organ of the General Conference, the re- 
port of its proceedings may be relied upon for 
correctness. Every effort will be made to make 
the Daily Advocate bring you the news of what 
the General Conference is doing. The price for 
the entire session will be $1. We are now ready 
to take your subscription, and shall be glad to 
begin listing names. It is not too soon to sub- 
scribe, so send your order for the Daily Advo- 
cate. Order from the nearest house. Smith & 
Lamar, Nashville, Tenn., Dallas, Tex., Rich- 
mond, Va. 



nortD Carolina Man Advocate 

ESTABLISHED 18SS 

h. m. blair. Edboi Organ of the Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church, South $1.50 Per Annum in a<Wc 



Volumn LIX GREENSBORO, N. C, FEBRUARY 19,1914 Number 7 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 

Entered at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C„ as 
mail matter of the second class. 



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Make all remittances to CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, 
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office. 





i 


EDITORIAL 


1 




Bishop Joseph S. Key 





We take pleasure in presenting the face of 
Bishop Key on our first page. He is our Senior 
in point of age. He was born in Georgia, July 
18, 1829. He entered the ministry in the old 
Georgia Conference in the year lti49. He was